• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 17,225 other followers

Book Your Annual Meeting Hotel at a Discount

113th AAA Annual MeetingThe 2014 Annual Meeting will take place at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel and Omni Shoreham Hotel. Both hotels will host scholarly panels and roundtables, special events, and other activities during the week-long conference.

AAA has negotiated special rates for AAA attendees at both hotels. Reservations can be made online via the links below. These rates are limited. Don’t hesitate and book today!

American Educational Research Association Grants Program – Deadline September 4

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) Grants Program, which is currently accepting applications for both Dissertation and Research Grants until September 4, 2014. Now in its 23rd year, the AERA Grants Program, with support from the National Science Foundation, provides small grants for conducting studies of education policy and practice using federally-funded, large-scale data sets. Applications are encouraged from a variety of disciplines, such as but not limited to, education, sociology, economics, psychology, demography, statistics, and psychometrics. Click here for a list of previously funded Dissertation Grant and Research Grant topics.

AERA Grants Program

  • AERA Dissertation Grants – AERA provides dissertation support for advanced doctoral students to undertake doctoral dissertations using data from the large-scale national or international data sets supported by the NCES, NSF, and/or other federal agencies. The selection process is competitive. AERA Dissertation Grants are awarded for one-year for an amount of up to $20,000. The next application deadline is Thursday, September 4, 2014.
  • AERA Research Grants: AERA provides small grants for faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, and other doctoral-level scholars to undertake quantitative research using data from the large-scale national or international data sets supported by the NCES, NSF, and/or other federal agencies. The selection process is competitive. AERA Research Grants are awarded for one or two years, for an amount of up to $35,000. The next application deadline is Thursday, September 4, 2014.

Contact grantsprogram@aera.net or phone 202-238-3225 with questions.

Call for Submissions – Ethnographic Terminalia

Today’s guest blog post is by Fiona McDonald.

Ethnographic Terminalia 2014 Call for Submissions

Submission deadline: September 5th, 2014
to ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

We seek projects in any medium for inclusion in Ethnographic Terminalia 2014––The Bureau of Memories: Archives and Ephemera. This theme (two sides of the same coin) invites reflection on the archive and its discontents. Washington’s identity as the seat of American political power is amplified through its role as the locus of its own memorialization. Where there is history, there is haunting. By drawing on the archive’s unnerving, uncanny, and ephemeral specters, this exhibition is an effort to re-imagine and reposition archives as sites which not only have the capacity to produce and contest historical memory, but also generate significant gaps and blind spots.

Ethnographic Terminalia is an initiative that brings artists and anthropologists together to present emerging research through installation and exhibition. As a platform from which divergent modes and methodologies of inquiry are articulated, Ethnographic Terminalia asks what lies within and beyond disciplinary territories, and how those boundaries shape the representation of cultural practice. Now in its sixth year, Ethnographic Terminalia represents a diversity of material, conceptual, and creative engagements where anthropology and art intersect. Inhabiting gallery spaces and site-specific locations, these include sound, drawing, sculpture, photography, printmaking, video, film, Internet and multi- media works. Organized as a para-site and Installation project of the American Anthropological Association annual meeting, this year’s exhibition will be shown in Washington D.C. at Hierarchy, a new venue near the AAA meeting headquarters.

Submission Format and Guidelines:

Please compile the information below into one MSWord format (.docx or .doc) document (MAX 10 pages), preferably in the following order:

  • Personal contact information (email, phone, postal address)
  • Title of project
  • An artist’s or maker’s statement of project (up to 300 words)
  • A short biographical statement (100 words)
  • A technical proposal for installation of your piece and footprint with measurements (dimensions and technical requirements). Please be as specific as possible about any technologies that you will require or provide.
  • A current CV or résumé (no more than 2 pages)

Submissions should also include:

  • 3 digital images (sized 300 dpi 4”x6”) of the proposed piece
  • A link somewhere in your document to a website for video works, if applicable

Send submissions and queries directly to: ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

Works must arrive in Washington, D.C. between November 25th and 30th, 2014. If you are unable to work with these dates, please indicate this in your proposal so that alternative arrangements can be made. Please note that preference will be given to completed works. Funding is regrettably not available to support the travel costs of artists, the development of works, shipping, or insurance.

Ethnographic Terminalia 2014—Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Memories: Archives and Ephemera will run from December 3rd-7th, 2014. There will be a reception on Friday, December 5th, 2014 at 7pm at Hierarchy and other special events TBA (schedule is subject to change).

All applicants will be notified about the status of their submission by October 1st, 2014

PDF Download: International Call for Submissions

Annual Meeting Dialogue on Israel-Palestine

Today’s blog post is by AAA Executive Director Dr. Edward Liebow.

Because violence begets violence, I have recently been looking for a better way (without bullets) to say ‘there’s no silver bullet’ to acknowledge the palpable absence of any simple remedy to the intractable latest episode in a decades-long Israeli/ Palestinian conflict. Indeed, in recent days, hopeful glimmers of an extended cease-fire are clouded by escalating negotiation demands with toweringly high stakes. This concerns me as an individual, and also as AAA Executive Director at a moment when we are opening up dialogue on Israel/Palestine inside the association.

Indeed, here at the AAA office, summer is almost over, and our planning machine is already at full speed in advance of December’s Annual Meeting in Washington. The program is available online. Judging by recent blog posts and social media exchanges, this year’s Meeting is among the more eagerly anticipated in recent memory, in no small part due to the opportunities that have been created for a scholarly consideration of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict – although of course there are possibilities for discussion both before and after. Anthropologists will be tackling many of the world’s challenges at this year’s Meeting, so let me take this opportunity to provide you with more information about the events surrounding the Israel/Palestine conflict.113th AAA Annual Meeting

Paper presentations, roundtable discussions, and an open forum discussion will allow participants to unpack this conflict’s historical, cultural, and political-economic contexts, and also examine the advocacy role of scholarly societies like the AAA.

Thanks to the hard work of AAA members, the program chairs, the Executive Program Committee, and the AAA meetings and conference staff, we have aimed to make sure a wide range of perspectives will be represented in these events, which include:

For more information and session abstracts, log in to the meetings site. We invite healthy, respectful debate, and look forward to a deliberate, considered, and educational dialogue.

Haven’t registered for the 113th Annual Meeting yet? Register today! Will you be traveling from out of town? Save money by booking your hotel now at a discounted rate.

Opportunities at the Smithsonian

Katie Patschke - 2014 AAA Summer InternWorking for the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art has allowed me to expand my knowledge of African studies by exploring the occupations and roles that Africans take on in their day to day lives. I am currently finishing up my research on the project by conducting in depth searches on topics that need more extensive research. This week I am going to be creating a list of objects that will be displayed in the “Creativity of Work” exhibit. This is a big project and I am hoping to continue researching on the “Creativity of Work” project in the near future.

Katie Patschke - 2014 AAA Summer Intern Last week we had a very special event held at the National Museum of African Art. During the African Summit the African Art museum held a First Ladies brunch for the First Ladies of Africa. As an intern I was in charge of setting up the event by creating place cards and gift bags, organizing the seating arrangements and working with the First Ladies to get anything that they needed. The event was a great success. It was such an honor to meet such powerful, important women who are true inspirations in African countries.Katie Patsche - 2014 AAA Summer Intern

This weekend I had the opportunity to visit some great parts of DC such as the International Spy Museum, Meridian Park, and Georgetown. I have enjoyed my experience in DC and plan to move here after my schooling finishes up in December. I am so grateful for this opportunity and would recommend the experience to aspiring anthropology students.Katie Patschke - 2014 AAA Summer Intern

Intern Preserving Naval Heritage

It has been a very busy couple of weeks since my last post. It is hard to believe that this internship is coming to an end. At the Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) of the History & Heritage Command (NHHC), I have continued to clean and preserve the two brass flash pans as well as work with more of the survey equipment. The photos below are what the artifact looked like before I started to clean it and then during the cleaning process.

Brass Flash Pan during cleaning

Brass Flash Pan during cleaning

Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History & Heritage Command

Brass Flash Pan Prior to cleaning

This past week I was able to go to Williamsburg, VA to test survey equipment out on the water for two days. It was great to actually see everything working after we got all the bugs worked out. This week the UAB is planning on conducting an archaeological survey to relocate a flagship near the D.C. area. I am hoping to be able to spend a day or two working with them on the survey to get as much experience as possible.  In the picture below, the long white object is a magnetometer. Once in  the water, it is towed behind the boat. There is a sensor on the magnetometer that detects changes in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is used to locate ferrous material such as iron that is buried under the seabed.  The sensor then sends a signal to a computer that makes a chart. When the sensor passes over iron on the seabed it makes a bump on the chart. The chart can later be analyzed to find the appropriate location of the wreck. We will be using this magnetometer when we are trying to relocate the flagship.Joshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer InternJoshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer Intern

I have been keeping busy during my free time as well. I drove up to Philadelphia the weekend before last to pickup my wife, May, from the airport and took her to New Jersey.  She is instructing a class at Fort Dix for two weeks. I enjoyed the small amount of time we had together.  This past weekend I learned to double check with the bus drivers around here on where they are actually going. I was planning on taking a bus out to Kent Island, MD to visit my cousin. The bus that was going to Kent Island, MD was actually going to California, MD which is two hours southwest of where I was supposed to be. I ended up getting a ride to a car rental place and drove out to Kent Island. On Saturday, we went out to a beach on my cousins boat and stayed the night. I was able to get up and watch the sun come up Sunday morning through a thick fog. It was a great start to the day.  We went crabbing shortly after I took this picture and caught a few crabs that we later steamed and ate.Joshua Anderson, 2104 AAA Summer Intern

Sunday afternoon my dad and family from Minnesota arrived out in Kent Island. They brought their camper out and are going to be spending the week in the D.C. area checking out all the sites and hanging out with family. When they got here we took a ride on the boat and then went out to eat. We ate at the Crab Deck on Kent Island and took the picture below.  I am looking forward to hanging out with them later this week.Joshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer Intern

After this week is over I am on my way to Fort Dix, NJ for two weeks to instruct a carpentry/masonry class for the army. When I get finished up there I finally get to go home. I will be jumping right into classes at Minnesota State University Mankato (MNSU) where I will continue working with the anthropology department conducting archaeological research.

This internship has allowed me to expand my knowledge, gain experience, and extend my abilities as an anthropologist. While at the American Anthropological Association I was able to aid in the planning process of the very first annual National Anthropology Day.  During my time at the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History & Heritage Command, I was able to work in the lab as well as get experience with some of the equipment in the field. I would like to thank all of the donors, professors at MNSU, and my family for encouraging this educational opportunity and supporting my future career as an anthropologist.Joshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer Intern

Taking Action to Preserve Heritage Sites in Mosul

The American Anthropological Association’s  Cultural Heritage Task Force writes to U.S. Secretary of State encouraging the United States to take action in preserving the cultural heritage sites in Mosul, Iraq. Below is a preview, read the entire letter (PDF).Secretary Kerry RE.Mosul

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 17,225 other followers