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It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

votingIt’s time to vote in the 2014 elections. Log-in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Annual Meeting Call for Papers – April 15 Deadline Reminder

Photo by HowStuffWorksThe 2014 AAA Annual Meeting Call for Papers embraces this year’s meeting theme Producing Anthropology. Please take a moment to familiarize yourself with the broad range of program changes designed to enhance the Annual Meeting experience and better meet the needs of our members and attendees. Click here for step by step instructions on the submission process. Take note of the important dates . Session proposals are due on April 15 at 5:00pm EDT.

Is the Affordable Care Act Really Affordable?

The newest issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly, a journal of the Society of Medical Anthropology, offers an in depth look at both the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and national health care systems worldwide.

Several of the articles in the journal offer a critical look at the ACA as the United States embarks its first health care reformation in over half a century. One article in particular, Critical Anthropology of Global Health “Takes A Stand” Statement: A Critical Medical Anthropological Approach to the U.S.’s Affordable Care Act looks at the driving force behind the ACA, it’s uneasy compromise with the insurance industry, the unconstitutionality of the original planned expansion of Medicaid, and the shortfalls the ACA imposes on the American population.

Written by Sarah Horton (UColorado, Denver), Cesar Abadía (UNacional de Columbia), Jessica Mulligan (Providence College) and Jennifer Jo Thompson (U Georgia) the article encourages anthropologists to join in the national conversation and sets benchmarks in which to measure the future progress of this emerging health care system. The authors come to conclude that “In the end, the ACA leaves the nation’s Goliath of a health care industry intact, imposing only mild regulations on insurance and pharmaceutical companies’ leveraging of profits” (p15).

Read the entire article, here.

Debut Issue of Economic Anthropology – Greed and Excess

SEA LogoThe Society for Economic Anthropology’s newest journal Economic Anthropology is now available!

The inaugural issue of Economic Anthropology, formerly published as the SEA Monograph Series, is now available on AnthroSource. This collection of articles from the proceedings of the Society for Economic Anthropology’s 2011 Annual Meeting Conference engages with and explores the concepts of “greed” and “excess” as accusations, ideas and behaviors that are shaped by social processes across time and place. Volume editors, Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijit note in their introduction that,

The articles in this collection are intended as just a first attempt to generate a broader conversation and move beyond accusatory judgments and folk concepts. Nonetheless, it is out hope that this issue will shed some new light on the ways and reasons that emotionally charged ideas and philosophies pertaining to greed and excess have emerged in past and present societies.

To access this exciting issue, login to AnthroSource.

Table of Contents

Economic AnthropologyIntroducing an Inquiry into the Social Economies of Greed and Excess – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijt

Section I: History and Contemporaneity of Greed and Excess
System Failure: Institutions, Incentives, and Collective Folly – James Surowiecki
Greed Is Bad, Neutral, and Good: A Historical Perspective on Excessive Accumulation and Consumption – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuij

Section II: Ambiguities of Surplus: Can Marginalized Peoples Be Greedy and Excessive?
Land, Labor, and Things: Surplus in a New West Indian Colony (1763-1807) – Mark W. Hauser
Poverty and Excess in Binge Economies – Richard Wilk
The Social and Economic Production of Greed Cooperation, and Taste in an Ohio Food Auction – Jeffrey H. Cohen and Susan M. Klemetti

Section III: Who Shares the Surplus: “Greedy” Subsistence Producers inTransition Economies
Greed in a “Tribal” Economy? Acquisitiveness and Reciprocity in Lisu Society – E. Paul Durrenberger and Kathleen Gillogly
Boons and Busts: Asset Dynamics, Disaster, and the Politics of Wealth in Rural Mongolia – Daniel J. Murphy
Risk-Seeking Peasants, Excessive Artisans: Speculation in the Northern Andes – Jason Antrosio and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld
Loci of Greed in a Caribbean Paradise: Land Conflicts in Bocas del Toro, Panama – Gayatri Thamp

Section IV: Entitled to the Surplus Greed and Excess among the Elites, Non-Elites, and the Nouveau Riche
The Potentiality and the Consequences of Surplus: Agricultural Production and Institutional Transformation in the Northern Basin of Mexico – Christopher Morehart
The Problem of Greed in Economic Anthropology: Sumptuary Laws and New Consumerism in China – Joseph Bosco

Section V: Some Perspectives and New Directions on the Anthropology of Greed and Excess
Folk and Scientific Concepts in the Study of Greed – Robert C. Hunt
The Rich Possibilities of Greed and Excess – Virginia R. Dominguez

Multimedia in Anthropology News Articles on Cultural Heritage

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Anthropology News (AN) is excited to present two essays in our series on Cultural Heritage that feature multimedia content and demonstrate how anthropologists can incorporate new technologies into their work and writing. By using multimedia technologies, readers are able to engage with and experience articles on AN in new and exciting ways. Contributors to Anthropology News can also use this technology to bring further texture to their research, analysis and writing. We encourage readers and contributors to try it out!

Multimedia in the Cultural Heritage Series

Antoinette T. Jackson’s article, “Intangible Cultural Heritage and Living Communities” allows readers to hear community members, Ms. Bertha and Ms. Florence as they share memories and reflections of their community, Nicodemus, KS. Listening to their voices, the reader is able to uniquely experience the history of this community and connect it with the work of the researcher. Jackson emphasizes the role “that the living community plays in cultural heritage preservation” and with the embedded sound clip, readers gain a deeper understanding of this role. Read the full article here.

Hülya Sakarya in, “Complexity of Heritage in Post-Conflict Settings,” shares with readers her fieldwork experience in Tiblisi, Georgia. Through an accompanying video, Sakarya brings readers into her fieldwork experience as she explores the complexity and ambiguity of the reopening of the  Abkhazian House at the Open Air Museum of Ethnography in Tiblisi, two decades since an ethnic conflict with Abkhazian separatists in Georgia. Click here for the full article.

For more in this great series on cultural heritage, check out the In Focus section of Anthropology News. Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels writes on “What is Cultural Heritage?,” Henrike Florusbosch explores the politics and economics of local heritage initiative in Mali and Ghana, Rabia Harmanşah describes doing fieldwork in contested places, such as Cyprus, Michael A Di Giovine and Sarah E Cowie consider, “The Definitional Problem of Patrimony and the Futures of Cultural Heritage,” Maria F Curtis provides analysis of the celebration of Nowruz in Houston, Richard Meyers, Charlotte E Davidson, April Eastman write on “Embracing Cultural Heritage in Higher Education Institutions,” Blaire O Gagnon discusses the use of the phrase “lean back” by an artisan-vendor in Mexico in comparison to Sheryl Sandberg’s promotion of “leaning in,” and Alejandro J Figueroa reflects on “Successful Local Cultural Heritage Management” in Honduras.

 

Save the Date: Webinar on Ethnography and Film with Dr. Harjant Gill

Harjant-GillOn May 8, 2014 at 2 PM Harjant Gill will lead the fourth installment of AAA’s Webinar Wednesday (mixing it up on THURSDAY).  Harjant Gill is an assistant professor of anthropology at Towson University, Maryland. He received his PhD from American University in 2012. His research examines the intersections of masculinity, modernity and migration in India. Gill is also an award-winning filmmaker and has made several films that have screened at film festivals and academic conferences worldwide. His latest documentary, Roots of Love explores the changing significance of hair and turban among Sikhs and is currently being screened on BBC World News, BBC America, Doordarshan (Indian National TV) and on PBS channels nationwide. Dr. Gill is currently co-directing the Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Film & Media Festival. His website is www.TilotamaProductions.com

AAA Mourns Loss of Richard Thomas, Member Services Manager

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Richard Thomas, 1950-2014

We are sad to report that Richard Thomas, AAA Membership Manager, passed away Tuesday April 1, 2014. Richard served as our membership manager for 14 years, since joining AAA staff on March 31, 2000. He was 63.

Richard was the face of our Annual Meeting Career Center (previously named the Placement Center) for employers and job candidates. He developed the AAA online Career Center that is a valuable resource of anthropology job ads for both employers and job seekers. His work on the career center was something he was proud of and enjoyed doing.

Richard also was instrumental in streamlining the Membership Services Department over the years as we moved along with the rest of the world from the heavily paper driven processes to the cloud.

Richard_2011 Meeting_Free poster

Richard and the “Leave your Mark. Major in anthropology” poster at the 2011 Annual Meeting.

Richard was the voice of calm during our annual mayhem of the Annual Meeting abstract submission deadline, with around 5,000 individuals submitting papers and sessions, many during the last 48 hours before the deadline. He spent hours on the phone helping members, and always with a smile. One staff remarked about his having “the patience of Job” one year just before deadline when he fielded call after call needing assistance to register or help putting an abstract into the system. Richard whispered, “They’re all my best friends.”

Richard_2012 Meeting_Career Center

Richard working at the Annual Meeting Career Center in 2012 in San Francisco.

Richard was particularly proud of his “Save the Dates” reminder postcards for our annual meeting and the “Leave your mark. Major in Anthropology” footprint poster distributed to anthropology departments far and wide.

Richard also worked with numerous committees and groups. At various times over the years he staffed the Association Operations Committee, the Committee for Human Rights, the Student Assembly and most recently the Education Task Force. He was also involved with the formalization of AAA interest groups.

Richard graduated  from Brigham Young University summa cum laude with a BA in history. Prior to working for AAA he worked at the National Society of Professional Engineers and the Nature Conservancy. Richard had a love for the west coast and talked often of returning to California for his golden years.

Richard is survived by a partner of 36 years and two sisters. He will be remembered fondly by staff for his love of history and dry wit.

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