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2015 Photo Contest Starts!

The AAA Photo Contest returns again this year, and submission are open to all active AAA members, submit here!

By the End of a Day

“By the End of a Day” from Ming Xue, photo selected for May 2015.

If you could define your work in a single picture, what would it look like?

AAA members work all around the world, in the most diverse cultures imaginable, and we want to showcase them.  If you attended the annual meeting last year in Chicago, you may have noticed a calendar waiting in your complimentary bag with some truly gorgeous pictures—drawing not just from cultural anthropology, but also archaeology, linguistic, biological and political fields.

We’d like to do it again this year, drawing from a new batch of photographs provided by you, our membership.  Photographs can be anything you believe relates to your work; the photographs may not portray any nudity or illicit activity.

Contestants may submit their work in one of three categories: people, places, practice.  Along with your photograph, include a caption for your work, and a brief autobiographical statement of no more than 150 words.  Your biography will not affect your likelihood of being featured in the calendar—we just like to learn a little bit more about our active members. Photographs must be your own, and you must be a current member of the AAA.  Winning photos in the calendar will be printed at 11×8, so be sure the resolution is good enough to print at those dimensions.

You may begin submitting your photographs today. You are more than welcome to submit up to 3 photographs, but only one will potentially be featured in the calendar. The deadline for entries will be August 6th.  After we’ve processed the photos, we’ll put all qualified entries to the membership for a vote in the late summer. The votes will be tallied, and the top 12 photos, from 12 different members, will be featured in the 2016 AAA calendar, which will be distributed at this year’s annual meeting in Denver, CO.  Of course, all winners will also be showcased on our website.

Questions? Want a 2015 Calendar?

Contact Andrew Russell at photos@aaanet.org

Webinar Wednesday with Larissa Sandy: Sex Work in Cambodia

Hello anthropology enthusiasts!  Our next webinar, with Larissa Sandy, will be the last scheduled before we take a break for the summer.  In it we’ll be exploring the struggles and livelihood of sex work in Cambodia. Before we get into Larissa’s incredible work, I’d like to take a moment to thank you all for an amazing first year of webinars.  What started out as a side project– and a chance for me to talk with some of my anthropology heroes– has evolved into a vibrant experience, and it always makes me smile to see folks tuning in to our twice a month journey into anthropology. Life can be hectic, and I appreciate that you all chose to spend your time with us. We have a great schedule for the fall leading up to the Annual Meeting in Denver this year, but for now let’s dive into Larissa’s webinar:

lsandyIt is very difficult for many people to understand sex work in Cambodia in terms other than trafficking, and so this webinar attempts to challenge and transform conventional thought and theory about sex work in non-Western modern settings like Cambodia.

In the webinar, I explore women’s pathways into sex work and highlight how this often begins with a series of constraints and choices that cannot be disconnected and which renders their identification as victims of trafficking or free agents highly problematic. The webinar shifts the focus of debate from very simplistic dichotomies by concentrating on descriptions of women’s lives rather than beginning with a priori assumptions (e.g. sex workers as victims enslaved in prostitution). I consider some of the difficulties surrounding the intersection of structural factors with subjective choices in sex workers’ everyday lives and analyse how Cambodia’s transitional economy and development plans shape sex working women’s trajectories into and experiences of sex work, and debt bondage in particular.

By exploring sex work through an anthropological lens, the webinar examines women’s involvement in the sector as part of the moral and political economies of sex work. It also discusses how sex work can be understood as a rational economic choice and a vehicle through which important social and cultural obligations fulfilled as well as reflecting on the pressing need to critically re-think the trafficking/sex slavery label.

Bio: Larissa Sandy is an anthropologist at RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia) where she lectures in the Criminology program. Her research examines sex work and women’s agency; contract labour, debt bondage and other forms of unfree labour in sex work; sex worker activism; and the global politics of sex work regulation. Before joining RMIT University, Larissa was a Vice Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in Criminology at Flinders University, where her research explored the effects of human trafficking laws and interventions for male and female sex workers in Cambodia. She is author of Women and Sex Work in Cambodia: Blood, Sweat and Tears (Routledge).

Bring your questions and curiosity, and don’t forget to register beforehand! The webinar begins 2 PM Eastern Time on May 20th, looking forward to seeing you there!

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs

Hope you all enjoyed your webinar hiatus (and Call for Papers period) because we’ve got two more amazing webinars coming your way before we break for the summer! The first, which will occur on May 6th, is hosted by Dr. Kenda R. Stewart, Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger, and Dr. David A. Katz. The second will be hosted by Dr. Larissa Sandy and will go live May 20th and will be focusing on Sex Work in Cambodia.  Both registrations are active and the password will be anthro when it’s time to join.  Larissa deserves her own blog post, so check back for that later next week.  For now, here’s a little preview of what’s coming your way May 6th:

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Kenda R. Stewart, PhD, David A. Katz, MD, MSc, and Heather Schacht Reisinger, PhD

In recent years the number of anthropologists employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs has exploded. In October 2013, Dr. David Atkins, the Director of VA’s Health Services Research & Development affirmed anthropologists’ contribution to health services research teams because of their expertise in understanding how culture can facilitate or impede efforts to improve health care. Using a mixed-methods smoking cessation study as an example, this webinar will explore the incorporation of anthropological methods and insights into the institutional and research structure of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Anthropologist Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger will provide an historical overview of the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE)’s Qualitative Core, housed at the Iowa City VA. Dr. Kenda Stewart, also an anthropologist, will discuss her role in conducting qualitative research on a smoking cessation intervention in collaboration with quantitative researcher, Dr. David Katz, MD, who will share his experience working with anthropologists and the advantages and challenges of incorporating anthropological methods into health services research.

Presenter bios:

Dr. Kenda R. Stewart is an anthropologist and qualitative analyst for the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE), the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center-Central Region, and the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) Demonstration Lab located in Iowa City, IA. Currently, she is involved in multiple VA studies on topics including evaluating telehealth modalities for rural Veterans with HIV, chronic pain management, smoking cessation, primary care teams, Veteran outreach, and infertility in Veterans.

Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger is an anthropologist and Investigator at CADRE and an Assistant Professor in the General Internal Medicine Division in the Department of Internal Medicine at University of Iowa. Currently, she is the Principle Investigator on two VA HSR&D-funded projects and has led qualitative components on several multi-site VA and non-VA studies on topics including substance abuse treatment, hypertension, MI and ACS, ICU telemedicine, and infection control.

Dr. David A. Katz is a Core Investigator in (CADRE) Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City.  He has expertise in conducting practice-based intervention research, and has an ongoing interest in the dynamics of changing clinician behavior.  He has collaborated closely with qualitative investigators in VA and NIH-funded implementation trials of smoking cessation guidelines in inpatient and outpatient practice settings.  Dr. Katz co-directs the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team Demonstration Laboratory, which is conducting an ongoing assessment of the patient-centered medical home initiative within the Veterans Health Administration.

As per usual, the webinar will begin at 2 PM Eastern Time. Please register here beforehand and don’t forget the password is ‘anthro’

Bring your questions and curiosity this is going to be a great one!

IV CONGRESS ON LATIN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY – Call for Papers

In addition to the call for panelists on the co-hosted sessions, The IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology’s call for papers is currently open until April 30th. Details and links below are provided by Ricardo A. Fagoga H., Head of the Media Committee for the IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology.
Call for Papers
Deadline: April 30, 2015.
We invite anthropologists and colleagues to present paper proposals at IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología that will take place October 7-10, 2015 in downtown Mexico City.
People interested in presenting a paper can ask to add his proposal to one of the ACCEPTED PANELS (see links below) or they can ask for a complete list writing to: congresoala2015@gmail.com.
To propose a paper, please complete the Paper Participation Form on the webpage of the conference (see link below), where we ask for title, abstract, and name and number of the panel in in which you want to participate, in case your paper is not already accepted in any panel. Also, we ask for personal information: name, institution, academic degree and e-mail. You can also ask for a paper proposal file if you write to congresoala2015@gmail.com.
 
 
Thank you for participating.
Sincerely,
 
Asociación Latinoamericana de Antropología (#ALAmx2015)
Dra. Cristina Oehmichen – Presidenta
Dra. Milka Castro – Vicepresidenta
Dra. Laura Valladares – Secretaria General
Antrop. María Antonieta Gallart – Tesorera
 
IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología
Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
 

 

IV CONGRESS ON LATIN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY – Call for Panel Participants

AAA will be co-hosting two panels at the IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology on October 7-10, 2015 in Mexico City, Mexico.

The panels are:

Public Space Symposium/Simposio “Espacio Público, Herencia Cultural y Resistencia”

This symposium explores a broad range of ethnographic examples of how cultural heritage is contested and represented in the public spaces of Latin America. The examples include both the everyday use of streets and sidewalks and more ritualized and political use of important urban places such as the Zocalo in Mexico City. The papers focus on different formulations of the concepts of “public space” and “cultural heritage” and include imaginary as well as material spaces that resonant with the search for national identity and claims to citizenship. Both the spaces and their cultural meanings are decoded symbolically and practically through their communicative and affective impacts. Many of the paper are also concerned with the ways that class, race and gender figure into the exclusion and inclusion of people in public space and from claiming their role as citizens and dissenters.

Security Abstract

This panel takes up Daniel Goldstein’s (2010) call for a “critical anthropology of security” by focusing on the processes and practices through which fear and the resulting desire for “security” are produced and reproduced within the contexts of different state security regimes. The differences in local responses to violence and crime—or in the US case, the lack of violence and crime—in public spaces and the subsequent retreat of the middle classes to gated and guarded communities form one part of this analysis. But for most middle-class people, seeking security—whether in the context of high or low levels of crime—security takes less obvious configurations. Papers on this panel put forth a variety of compelling approaches to the anthropology of the security, examining the processes and practices of securitization, parenting, neighborhood relationships and activities, and social interactions in public spaces to query how this elusive “good,” that is a sense of security, can be procured in an increasing insecure and violent world. Further, the papers attempt to identify the roles of both the state and public sector institutions, and increase of private institutions and forms of governance in this “security-seeking” endeavor.

For meeting details, submission information and registration, click here.

AAA Appoints Jeff Martin as New Director of Communications and Public Affairs

MartinJeff_325The American Anthropological Association (AAA) has appointed Jeff Martin, a communications veteran with more than 25 years experience in the field, as the Association’s new director, communications and public affairs. Martin will be responsible for directing the Association’s media outreach, public education, and government relations programs.

“Jeff Martin brings a wealth of public relations experience to the table,” said AAA Executive Director Ed Liebow. “The knowledge he has gained working for the non-profit, private, and government sectors as well as community-based groups give him a distinct perspective on the nuances of communicating across our broad spectrum of diverse members and sister organizations. His extensive travel and cross-cultural skills acquired living overseas, from the South Pacific to the Caribbean, will also add a great deal of value to our organization and anthropology as we face global challenges that require collaborative solutions.”

Before joining AAA, Martin has served in public relations capacities for the Council on Foundations, The Nature Conservancy, and Peace Corps. He has also worked with international firms including Bozell, Kenyon & Eckhardt, and Edelman Public Relations Worldwide.

A graduate from Arizona State University, he worked as a journalist before going into public affairs and has won awards from the Public Relations Society of America and the New Jersey Press Association. He also has had articles featured in several publications, including Travel & Leisure, Cineaste, American Cowboy, and the Denver Post.

 

CONTACT:

Jeff Martin
Director, Communications and Public Affairs
571-483-1163
Mobile: 240-393-1149
jmartin@aaanet.org

Joslyn Osten,
Marketing and Public Relations Manager,
703-528-1902 x 1171
Mobile: 571-581-8262
josten@aaanet.org

– – AAA – –

The American Anthropological Association, dedicated to advancing human understanding and addressing the world’s most pressing problems since its founding in 1902, is the world’s largest professional anthropology organization.

Webinar Wednesday March 18: Applied Anthropology in the National Parks

As the National Park Service (NPS) approaches its centennial in 2016, the NPS Cultural Anthropology and Archeology Programs continue to engage in research with deep roots in communities across America.By partnering with universities and scholars in the CESU Network (Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units), the NPS funds applied research in ethnography and archeology.This session will introduce current, completed, and upcoming NPS-CESU research; how to submit letters of interest for research through the CESU network; and how students may become involved in applied work in parks.

Keywords: parks; applied; heritage; research; government

Links:
NPS Cultural Anthropology Program: www.nps.gov/ethnography

NPS Archeology Program: www.nps.gov/archeology

Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network: www.cesu.org

Joe Watkins is the Supervisory Cultural Anthropologist and Chief of the NPS Tribal Relations and American Cultures. He oversees the Park Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program, the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, and the Cultural Anthropology Program from the NPS Washington Area Service Office.

Stanley Bond is the Chief Archeologist for the National Park Service and Consulting Archeologist for the Department of the Interior. He has managed a number of CESU projects as a NPS Archeologist, Resource Manager, and Superintendent. Current CESU projects sponsored by the NPS Washington Archeology Program include a Southwest mission travel itinerary, a webinar lecture series, work with Latino high school students, analysis of digital imaging practices, and training for Afghan cultural heritage professionals.

Jennifer Talken-Spaulding is the Regional Cultural Anthropologist for the NPS National Capital Region. She manages multiple applied anthropology projects and a student internship program in support of national park units in three states and the District of Columbia. Research topics include contemporary communities, heritage preservation, and urban subsistence fishing.

Tom Fish is the National Coordinator for the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network. Tom works across government, academia, and the NGO community to facilitate collaborative research, technical assistance, and education/capacity development in support of public trust resource stewardship. Tom’s work covers a wide range of topics relating to land use planning, marine conservation, applied social science and human dimensions, and training for protected area managers in the U.S. and abroad.

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