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Everyday Enforcement: New City and Society Issue

With mid-term elections fueling mobilization efforts across the political spectrum, immigration policy is at the fore of debates and conversations at the federal, state and local levels. In FY 2013, 368,644 individuals were deported, continuing the trend of annual deportations of over 350,000 individuals since 2009 (U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement). At the same time, an increase of legislation at the state and local levels has targeted undocumented immigrants, with 184 laws and 253 resolutions related to immigration enacted in 2013 (National Conference of State Legislatures). For undocumented migrants, these policies result in an uneven and often precarious experience. A “patch quilt of relatively safe and dangerous spaces” has been produced, as James Quesada points out, in the exciting new issue of City & Society on immigration enforcement.

The essays in the April issue of City & Society delve into the everyday challenges experienced by undocumented immigrants across the United States. They also describe the strategies employed by immigrant communities to negotiate practices of enforcement and highlight immigrant-organizing practices that construct conceptions of human rights and justice. Issue editors, Ruth Gomberg-Munoz and Laura Nussbaum-Barberena note in their Introduction,* “Perhaps most importantly, these articles reveal some of the human faces behind a “post-9/11” enforcement-oriented landscape and contribute analyses and models for action that can be engaged at the community level across the United States.”

To access this timely issue, login to AnthroSource.

Migration is on our minds! For more research and commentary check out Anthropology News and American Anthropologist. In Anthropology News, Robert Muckle writes on the archaeology of undocumented migration, and Grabriella Sanchez offers insights on human smuggling in Arizona through a two-part series. American Anthropologist offers several commentaries in the Vital Topics Forum, “On Latin@s and the Immigration Debate.”*

*Content is open and accessible for 30 days through Wiley Online Library.

Green Options for AAA Members

Earth Day is a great opportunity to remember the green options that the American Anthropological Association offers to its members:

AAA Journals To Go Fully Digital in 2016

pub modelReaders may recall that in November 2013, the AAA Executive Board adopted a series of recommendations from the Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing that embrace new ways of producing and distributing its journals and endeavor to get the association’s publishing program on sustainable footing. One of the several changes includes member print copies becoming fully digital starting in 2016. Individual members can purchase, at cost, a print subscription to any journal published by sections that member has joined if they wish to receive the print copy.

Don’t want to wait until 2016 for your digital copies? You can help lower our ecological footprint today by opting out of receiving AAA’s print journals. 14 section journals are currently participating in this special green initiative. Receive the same great content online as you would in the print version. Contact Members Services to participate today.

Green Annual Meeting Registration

2014-AAA-Annual-Mtg-logo-Small-CMYKMore than 25% of meeting attendees last year opted for the Green Registration. Offered at a discounted rate, the green registration offsets AAA’s carbon footprint by choosing to use an e-reader formatted program, online personal scheduler and/or the AAA Annual Meeting Mobile app to navigate the conference. Thus far, more than 30% of meeting registrants have opted to go green. Meeting Registration is going on now, if you haven’t already, opt to go Green today!

The Anthropology and the Environment Section offer guidelines, called “Greening the Meeting,” to help meeting participants reduce their carbon footprint. Their suggestions include individual choices to be made about transportation, use of standard hotel services, and communications.

2014 AAA Summer Interns Announced

Through generous member donations, two anthropology students, Joshua Anderson and Katie Patschke, will have the opportunity to spend this summer working with the AAA as part of the Association’s Summer Internship Program. They will also work with partnering host organizations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The students were selected from more than fifty candidates based on their field of anthropological interest, academic strength, and recommendations from their professors.

Joshua AndersonJoshua Anderson is a senior at Minnesota State University – Mankato, and majors in anthropology with an emphasis on archaeology. He has a technical degree in Honda and Yamaha motorcycle mechanics from Universial Technical Institute in Phoenix, AZ. Joshua has served in the United States Army Reserves for 12 years, serving two deployments. Currently, he is an instructor teaching Carpentry/Masonry courses as well as actively working as a field supervisor for a county-wide archaeological survey at Minnesota State University – Mankato. As an AAA summer intern, Joshua will intern with Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC). NHHC is the official history program of the Department of the Navy. He will be working with the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the NHHC and will be conducting archaeological and historical research, synthesizing field information to prepare policy and case studies, as well as conserving artifacts and assisting with the inventory, management and artifact loan programs.

Katie PatschkeKatie Patschke, is a junior at Susquehanna University. She will graduate December 2014 with a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, Anthropology, and Studio Art. She is an active student leader who currently holds three president positions for clubs as well as being a member of the service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega. Katie will intern with the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and be placed in the museum’s curatorial department where her tasks would include research on gender theory and object-based work related to a future exhibition on the contributions of, and issues addressed by, African contemporary woman artists.

Both Anderson and Patschke will also spend a portion of their time at the AAA offices, where they will be working with the Association’s public education program, RACE: Are We So Different?, researching various pieces of Federal legislation and regulatory initiatives and sharing their internship experience with members in Association publications and social media.

The AAA Summer Internship Program is in its fourth consecutive year. The internship provides professional experience to anthropology students and assists in shaping the foundation of their anthropological careers. This program is fully funded through member donations.

Make a donation to the Summer Internship Program, today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

votingIt’s time to vote in the 2014 elections. Log-in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Annual Meeting Call for Papers – April 15 Deadline Reminder

Photo by HowStuffWorksThe 2014 AAA Annual Meeting Call for Papers embraces this year’s meeting theme Producing Anthropology. Please take a moment to familiarize yourself with the broad range of program changes designed to enhance the Annual Meeting experience and better meet the needs of our members and attendees. Click here for step by step instructions on the submission process. Take note of the important dates . Session proposals are due on April 15 at 5:00pm EDT.

Is the Affordable Care Act Really Affordable?

The newest issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly, a journal of the Society of Medical Anthropology, offers an in depth look at both the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and national health care systems worldwide.

Several of the articles in the journal offer a critical look at the ACA as the United States embarks its first health care reformation in over half a century. One article in particular, Critical Anthropology of Global Health “Takes A Stand” Statement: A Critical Medical Anthropological Approach to the U.S.’s Affordable Care Act looks at the driving force behind the ACA, it’s uneasy compromise with the insurance industry, the unconstitutionality of the original planned expansion of Medicaid, and the shortfalls the ACA imposes on the American population.

Written by Sarah Horton (UColorado, Denver), Cesar Abadía (UNacional de Columbia), Jessica Mulligan (Providence College) and Jennifer Jo Thompson (U Georgia) the article encourages anthropologists to join in the national conversation and sets benchmarks in which to measure the future progress of this emerging health care system. The authors come to conclude that “In the end, the ACA leaves the nation’s Goliath of a health care industry intact, imposing only mild regulations on insurance and pharmaceutical companies’ leveraging of profits” (p15).

Read the entire article, here.

Debut Issue of Economic Anthropology – Greed and Excess

SEA LogoThe Society for Economic Anthropology’s newest journal Economic Anthropology is now available!

The inaugural issue of Economic Anthropology, formerly published as the SEA Monograph Series, is now available on AnthroSource. This collection of articles from the proceedings of the Society for Economic Anthropology’s 2011 Annual Meeting Conference engages with and explores the concepts of “greed” and “excess” as accusations, ideas and behaviors that are shaped by social processes across time and place. Volume editors, Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijit note in their introduction that,

The articles in this collection are intended as just a first attempt to generate a broader conversation and move beyond accusatory judgments and folk concepts. Nonetheless, it is out hope that this issue will shed some new light on the ways and reasons that emotionally charged ideas and philosophies pertaining to greed and excess have emerged in past and present societies.

To access this exciting issue, login to AnthroSource.

Table of Contents

Economic AnthropologyIntroducing an Inquiry into the Social Economies of Greed and Excess – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijt

Section I: History and Contemporaneity of Greed and Excess
System Failure: Institutions, Incentives, and Collective Folly – James Surowiecki
Greed Is Bad, Neutral, and Good: A Historical Perspective on Excessive Accumulation and Consumption – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuij

Section II: Ambiguities of Surplus: Can Marginalized Peoples Be Greedy and Excessive?
Land, Labor, and Things: Surplus in a New West Indian Colony (1763-1807) – Mark W. Hauser
Poverty and Excess in Binge Economies – Richard Wilk
The Social and Economic Production of Greed Cooperation, and Taste in an Ohio Food Auction – Jeffrey H. Cohen and Susan M. Klemetti

Section III: Who Shares the Surplus: “Greedy” Subsistence Producers inTransition Economies
Greed in a “Tribal” Economy? Acquisitiveness and Reciprocity in Lisu Society – E. Paul Durrenberger and Kathleen Gillogly
Boons and Busts: Asset Dynamics, Disaster, and the Politics of Wealth in Rural Mongolia – Daniel J. Murphy
Risk-Seeking Peasants, Excessive Artisans: Speculation in the Northern Andes – Jason Antrosio and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld
Loci of Greed in a Caribbean Paradise: Land Conflicts in Bocas del Toro, Panama – Gayatri Thamp

Section IV: Entitled to the Surplus Greed and Excess among the Elites, Non-Elites, and the Nouveau Riche
The Potentiality and the Consequences of Surplus: Agricultural Production and Institutional Transformation in the Northern Basin of Mexico – Christopher Morehart
The Problem of Greed in Economic Anthropology: Sumptuary Laws and New Consumerism in China – Joseph Bosco

Section V: Some Perspectives and New Directions on the Anthropology of Greed and Excess
Folk and Scientific Concepts in the Study of Greed – Robert C. Hunt
The Rich Possibilities of Greed and Excess – Virginia R. Dominguez

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