• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 20,567 other followers

IV CONGRESS ON LATIN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY – Call for Papers

In addition to the call for panelists on the co-hosted sessions, The IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology’s call for papers is currently open until April 30th. Details and links below are provided by Ricardo A. Fagoga H., Head of the Media Committee for the IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology.
Call for Papers
Deadline: April 30, 2015.
We invite anthropologists and colleagues to present paper proposals at IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología that will take place October 7-10, 2015 in downtown Mexico City.
People interested in presenting a paper can ask to add his proposal to one of the ACCEPTED PANELS (see links below) or they can ask for a complete list writing to: congresoala2015@gmail.com.
To propose a paper, please complete the Paper Participation Form on the webpage of the conference (see link below), where we ask for title, abstract, and name and number of the panel in in which you want to participate, in case your paper is not already accepted in any panel. Also, we ask for personal information: name, institution, academic degree and e-mail. You can also ask for a paper proposal file if you write to congresoala2015@gmail.com.
 
 
Thank you for participating.
Sincerely,
 
Asociación Latinoamericana de Antropología (#ALAmx2015)
Dra. Cristina Oehmichen – Presidenta
Dra. Milka Castro – Vicepresidenta
Dra. Laura Valladares – Secretaria General
Antrop. María Antonieta Gallart – Tesorera
 
IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología
Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
 

 

IV CONGRESS ON LATIN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY – Call for Panel Participants

AAA will be co-hosting two panels at the IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology on October 7-10, 2015 in Mexico City, Mexico.

The panels are:

Public Space Symposium/Simposio “Espacio Público, Herencia Cultural y Resistencia”

This symposium explores a broad range of ethnographic examples of how cultural heritage is contested and represented in the public spaces of Latin America. The examples include both the everyday use of streets and sidewalks and more ritualized and political use of important urban places such as the Zocalo in Mexico City. The papers focus on different formulations of the concepts of “public space” and “cultural heritage” and include imaginary as well as material spaces that resonant with the search for national identity and claims to citizenship. Both the spaces and their cultural meanings are decoded symbolically and practically through their communicative and affective impacts. Many of the paper are also concerned with the ways that class, race and gender figure into the exclusion and inclusion of people in public space and from claiming their role as citizens and dissenters.

Security Abstract

This panel takes up Daniel Goldstein’s (2010) call for a “critical anthropology of security” by focusing on the processes and practices through which fear and the resulting desire for “security” are produced and reproduced within the contexts of different state security regimes. The differences in local responses to violence and crime—or in the US case, the lack of violence and crime—in public spaces and the subsequent retreat of the middle classes to gated and guarded communities form one part of this analysis. But for most middle-class people, seeking security—whether in the context of high or low levels of crime—security takes less obvious configurations. Papers on this panel put forth a variety of compelling approaches to the anthropology of the security, examining the processes and practices of securitization, parenting, neighborhood relationships and activities, and social interactions in public spaces to query how this elusive “good,” that is a sense of security, can be procured in an increasing insecure and violent world. Further, the papers attempt to identify the roles of both the state and public sector institutions, and increase of private institutions and forms of governance in this “security-seeking” endeavor.

For meeting details, submission information and registration, click here.

AAA Appoints Jeff Martin as New Director of Communications and Public Affairs

MartinJeff_325The American Anthropological Association (AAA) has appointed Jeff Martin, a communications veteran with more than 25 years experience in the field, as the Association’s new director, communications and public affairs. Martin will be responsible for directing the Association’s media outreach, public education, and government relations programs.

“Jeff Martin brings a wealth of public relations experience to the table,” said AAA Executive Director Ed Liebow. “The knowledge he has gained working for the non-profit, private, and government sectors as well as community-based groups give him a distinct perspective on the nuances of communicating across our broad spectrum of diverse members and sister organizations. His extensive travel and cross-cultural skills acquired living overseas, from the South Pacific to the Caribbean, will also add a great deal of value to our organization and anthropology as we face global challenges that require collaborative solutions.”

Before joining AAA, Martin has served in public relations capacities for the Council on Foundations, The Nature Conservancy, and Peace Corps. He has also worked with international firms including Bozell, Kenyon & Eckhardt, and Edelman Public Relations Worldwide.

A graduate from Arizona State University, he worked as a journalist before going into public affairs and has won awards from the Public Relations Society of America and the New Jersey Press Association. He also has had articles featured in several publications, including Travel & Leisure, Cineaste, American Cowboy, and the Denver Post.

 

CONTACT:

Jeff Martin
Director, Communications and Public Affairs
571-483-1163
Mobile: 240-393-1149
jmartin@aaanet.org

Joslyn Osten,
Marketing and Public Relations Manager,
703-528-1902 x 1171
Mobile: 571-581-8262
josten@aaanet.org

– – AAA – –

The American Anthropological Association, dedicated to advancing human understanding and addressing the world’s most pressing problems since its founding in 1902, is the world’s largest professional anthropology organization.

Webinar Wednesday March 18: Applied Anthropology in the National Parks

As the National Park Service (NPS) approaches its centennial in 2016, the NPS Cultural Anthropology and Archeology Programs continue to engage in research with deep roots in communities across America.By partnering with universities and scholars in the CESU Network (Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units), the NPS funds applied research in ethnography and archeology.This session will introduce current, completed, and upcoming NPS-CESU research; how to submit letters of interest for research through the CESU network; and how students may become involved in applied work in parks.

Keywords: parks; applied; heritage; research; government

Links:
NPS Cultural Anthropology Program: www.nps.gov/ethnography

NPS Archeology Program: www.nps.gov/archeology

Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network: www.cesu.org

Joe Watkins is the Supervisory Cultural Anthropologist and Chief of the NPS Tribal Relations and American Cultures. He oversees the Park Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program, the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, and the Cultural Anthropology Program from the NPS Washington Area Service Office.

Stanley Bond is the Chief Archeologist for the National Park Service and Consulting Archeologist for the Department of the Interior. He has managed a number of CESU projects as a NPS Archeologist, Resource Manager, and Superintendent. Current CESU projects sponsored by the NPS Washington Archeology Program include a Southwest mission travel itinerary, a webinar lecture series, work with Latino high school students, analysis of digital imaging practices, and training for Afghan cultural heritage professionals.

Jennifer Talken-Spaulding is the Regional Cultural Anthropologist for the NPS National Capital Region. She manages multiple applied anthropology projects and a student internship program in support of national park units in three states and the District of Columbia. Research topics include contemporary communities, heritage preservation, and urban subsistence fishing.

Tom Fish is the National Coordinator for the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network. Tom works across government, academia, and the NGO community to facilitate collaborative research, technical assistance, and education/capacity development in support of public trust resource stewardship. Tom’s work covers a wide range of topics relating to land use planning, marine conservation, applied social science and human dimensions, and training for protected area managers in the U.S. and abroad.

National Anthropology Day: Looking towards 2016

National Anthropology DayWe celebrated the first National Anthropology Day on February 19, 2015. The celebration was a great success, with more than 80 college campuses, organizations, museums, elementary and high schools participating. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) introduced a Congressional Proclamation to publicly recognize the field, and to declare the third Thursday in February as an annual day for celebration.

Anthropologists around the world took to social media to celebrate and document their activities to earmark the day. AAA hosted its first Reddit “ask me anything” (AMA) event, with staff fielding dozens of questions about anthropology and the Association. Several blogs had fun suggesting ways the day could be celebrated. More than 14,000 tweets, posts and blog posts were made with the #NationalAnthropologyDay hashtag. On-campus Anthropology Clubs reached out to nearby high schools, and took part in a selfie social media contest. Students from Minnesota State University Mankato, El Camino College, and Hunter College – CUNY each won $100 for future Anthropology Club activities.

AAA Past President Yolanda Moses celebrated National Anthropology Day with an interview highlighting the RACE: Are We So Different? public education project on the Marin County Public Radio, KWMR. Click here to listen to the interview.

We are already looking forward to next year, expanding our horizons internationally. AAA is in conversation with our sister societies in physical, applied, and archaeology, as well as the World Council of Anthropological Associations and the IUAES. Mark your calendars, next year’s Anthropology Day celebration will take place on February 18, 2016.

CMIA Minority Dissertation Fellowship Program deadline extended to March 15th

The CMIA Minority Dissertation Fellowship Program deadline has been extended to March 15th.  If you are interested please contact me at arussell@aaanet.org or 703-528-1902.

The Award

The American Anthropological Association invites minority doctoral candidates in anthropology to apply for a dissertation writing fellowship of $10,000. The annual AAA Minority Dissertation Fellowship is intended to encourage members of racialized minorities to complete doctoral degrees in anthropology, thereby increasing diversity in the discipline and/or promoting research on issues of concern among minority populations. Dissertation topics in all areas of the discipline are welcome. Doctoral students who require financial assistance to complete the write-up phase of the dissertation are urged to apply.

A nonrenewable dissertation fellowship of $10,000 will be provided annually to one anthropology graduate student.

Read About Past Minority Dissertation Fellowship Winners

Eligibility

An applicant must be:  (1) a member of an historically underrepresented U.S. racialized minority group such as African Americans, Alaska Natives, American Indians or Native Americans, Asian Americans, Latino/as, Chicano/as, or Pacific Islanders; (2) graduated from a U.S. high school or completed a GED certificate in the U.S.; (3) enrolled in a full-time academic program leading to a doctoral degree in anthropology at the time of application (4) admitted to degree candidacy before the dissertation fellowship is awarded; and (5) a member of the American Anthropological Association. The dissertation proposal must be approved by the applicant’s committee prior to application. Students of any subfield or specialty in anthropology will receive equal consideration.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Candidates must have a record of outstanding academic achievement.
  • Applicants must be members of the American Anthropological Association at least one month prior to submitting materials for the AAA Minority Dissertation Fellowship Program.
  • Applicants must have had their dissertation proposals approved by their dissertation committees prior to application.
  • The dissertation research must be in an area of anthropological research.
  • The recipient of the fellowship must be in need of a fellowship to complete the dissertation. The applicant will be required to provide information regarding their current financial and funding situation.

Award

Decisions will be based upon the quality of the submitted information and the likelihood that the recipient will have a good chance at completing the dissertation. The AAA Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology will serve as the selection panel. The award recipient will be notified by telephone and mail as soon as the decision is made, no later than the 1st week of July. The award will also be announced in the October or November Anthropology News.

After completion of the dissertation, by June 15th, the award recipient must submit a 1-page report specifying the status of the degree and the dissertation’s defense, along with a copy of the dissertation abstract, to the Executive Director of the AAA. The dissertation committee chair or head of the department should cosign this report. Highlights of this report may be published in AN.

Payment of Award

Fellowship funds will be paid directly to the awardee (rather than the institution) in three installments: one by September 10th and the second by January 10th. The third installment will be received upon receipt of final report. Award will be reported to the Internal Revenue Service.

The online application will be extended until March 15th.

Questions?
If you have any questions, please contact Andrew Russell at arussell@aaanet.org or 703-528-1902.

2015 AAA Leadership Fellows Program

The AAA Leadership Fellows Program provides a unique opportunity for anthropologists early in their careers to learn about leadership opportunities within the association. Each year a group of three to five fellows will be paired with a mentor chosen from among AAA leadership. Mentors are available to fellows throughout the year to answer questions related to AAA. Fellows shadow their mentors at the AAA Annual Meeting in meetings of the Executive Board, Association Committees, and Section Committees. In addition, fellows are invited to attend the AAA Donors Reception and a Leadership Fellows Social bringing together past and present cohorts of fellows.

Eligibility

At the time of application, the applicant must be:
• a current member of the American Anthropological Association
• within three to five years of having completed their terminal degree in anthropology or an allied field. *
* Applicants not holding a terminal degree in anthropology should have a strong presence in the discipline at the time the application is submitted.
 
The online application is open in early March. Applications must be submitted by April 6. Awardees are notified in May and announced in Anthropology News. Fellows are required to attend the AAA Annual Meeting of their award year. As a result, Fellows receive up to $500 reimbursement for costs of travel.

To learn more and apply, click here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,567 other followers