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Camp AAA Childcare Hours Extended for 113th AAA Annual Meeting

113th AAA Annual Meeting

New for the 113th AAA Annual Meeting, Camp AAA childcare will have extended hours.

CAMP AAA welcomes children ages 6 months – 12 years. Children participate in age-appropriate activities including arts and crafts projects, active games and much more in a safe, nurturing environment.

Wednesday, December 3 – 11am to 10pm
Thursday, December 4 – Saturday, December 6 – 8:30am to 8:30pm
Sunday, December 7 – 7:30am to 2pm

Registration is now open. Space is limited. Click here for details and to register.

 

AES Graduate-Student Workshops at the 113th AAA Annual Meeting

American Ethnological Society

The American Ethnological Society is pleased to announce its ongoing series of graduate-student workshops. The workshops will take place during the American Anthropological Association’s 113th Annual Meeting in Washington DC.

Each workshop is limited to ten students. The workshops are free. To apply for a workshop, please send a 250-300-word description of your research project and its relationship to the workshop theme. Descriptions will be shared with other workshop participants in advance of the meeting. In addition, your faculty leader(s) may circulate one short piece for discussion.

Preference will be given to AES Student Members, though non-members are also encouraged to apply. Students can join the AES for $18.

To apply for a workshop, or if you have any questions, please contact: Andrew Hernann (ahernann@gc.cuny.edu). The deadline to apply is November 1, 2014.

We are pleased to offer the following five workshops:

Teaching Intro: Strategies for Reaching our Largest Public Audience
Faculty facilitator: Kenneth Guest (Baruch College CUNY/AES Treasurer)
Date: Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014
Time: 9:00 am-10: 45 am

More than 200,000 students take “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology” in the United States every year. This is by far anthropology’s largest public audience. It is where anthropology departments have their largest enrollments—and we may have these students for as many as 15 weeks. Facilitated by Prof. Kenneth Guest, author of the new textbook, Cultural Anthropology: A Toolkit for a Global Age (2014), this discussion considers strategies for engaging introductory students in deep learning about the way the world works using the tools of anthropology.

Ethnography for the 21st Century
Faculty facilitators: Joseph Masco (University of Chicago), Ken Wissoker (Editorial Director, Duke University Press)
Date: Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm-2:15 pm

Ethnography, by definition, seeks to describe and theorize culture. Words on the page, however, are a rather thin device relative to culture’s “thickness.” Nonetheless, despite the dramatic technological innovations of the past couple of decades, the written ethnography has remained largely unchanged. In this workshop, we explore the possibilities beyond the traditional written ethnography. We ask such questions as: How can ethnographers make use of both hardware and software, including e-readers, websites, etc.? How can we utilize technology to create an ethnography that better connects, informs and teaches increasingly techno-savvy undergraduates? Facilitated by Prof. Joseph Masco and Editorial Director Ken Wissoker, this workshop brings together experts in ethnography and technology and future ethnographers, critically engaging the potentials of this technoscape for the ethnographic genre.

Publishing in Anthropology: Tips on Academic Writing and Peer Review
Faculty facilitators: Angelique Haugerud (Editor, American Ethnologist/Rutgers University), Catherine Besteman (AE editorial board member/Colby College), Eric Gable (AE book review editor/University of Mary Washington), and other AE editorial board members.
Date: Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm-2:15 pm

In this workshop, Prof. Angelique Haugerud, Prof. Catherine Besteman, and Prof. Eric Gable offer advice on publishing in scholarly journals as well as for wider audiences. Topics include elements of successful academic writing, navigating the peer review process, what goes on behind the scenes in editorial boards and editorial offices, selecting journals and approaching editors, writing for edited volumes, preparing book reviews and book prospectuses, and how to get an article accepted in the American Ethnologist. This session will include time for participants to ask questions about a range of publishing processes and practices.

Writing Violence
Faculty facilitators: Carolyn Nordstrom (Notre Dame University), Sally Engle Merry (New York University)
Date: Friday, Dec. 5, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm-2:15 pm

All ethnographic writing poses challenges. A political act, ethnography raises questions of representation and (inter-)subjectivity. However, ethnography of violence and conflict encounters some particular issues. For instance: How to avoid fetishizing violence? How to alleviate the perpetrator-victim dichotomy? How to prevent accounts of violence from becoming white noise? How to prevent violence from becoming a trope in/for certain regions? Following up on last year’s successful graduate student roundtable, “Methodological and Ethical Issues in Ethnographic Research on Conflict and Violence,” co-facilitators Prof. Carolyn Nordstrom and Prof. Sally Engle Merry come together again in order to take a critical look at the difficulties of writing about violence.

Bridging the Gap: On Anthropology and Islamic Studies
Faculty facilitators: Engseng Ho (Duke University), Andrew Shryock (University of Michigan)
Date: Friday, Dec. 5, 2014
Time: 9:00 am-10:45 am

Trans-disciplinarity has been in vogue for the past decade, yet, the conversation in many ways remains confused and/or unapproachable. This is especially problematic for anthropologists of Islam. Anthropology tends to privilege “popular” or “syncretic” expressions of religion, often underplaying the influence of “orthodoxy” and central religious texts. As a result, anthropology frequently fails to create a space to learn or critically engage the literature and theoretical entry points that are central to Islamic Studies. The result: (1) an anthropology ill-equipped to consider more “formal” approaches to Islam, as well as their relationship to “popular” Islam; and (2) an anthropology unable to effectively communicate with Islamic Studies (and vice versa). In this workshop, Prof. Engseng Ho and Prof. Andrew Shryock discuss how we can make the two disciplines better resonate with one another. Specifically, we ask: How can anthropologists make better use of Islamic Studies; and can anthropological work effectively contribute to Islamic Studies? A fresh contribution to the discussion of trans-disciplinarity, this workshop explores how to resist disciplinary enclavement and engage broader analyses in theoretically meaningful ways.

It’s Webinar Wednesday!

Join Dr. Ken C. Erickson this afternoon at 2pm ET for Webinar Wednesday! Registration is required, webinar is free: http://bit.ly/1lU3FNY

KenDoing “Consumer” Anthropology, Warnings and Advice*

Whether its burgers or Boeing, anthropological technique and theory have found significant purchase in the business world. Sometimes. The questions Anthropologists ask often lead to discomfiting revisions in thinking about who buys products and services and what using or experiencing them means. Bringing anthropological stories to the enterprise table can even raise fundamental questions about the nature of business. Fundamental questions (about value, valuation, sustainability, and suffering caused by organizations, for example) need not be laid aside while asking and answering enterprise tactical questions. Using video examples and tales from the field, this webinar offers tips and tricks for finding an anthropological focus that can be heard and, sometimes, become levers to think about and change organizational practices.

DSP Member Special Invitation – New Faculty & Students receive 30% off membership dues

Today’s guest blog post is by AAA Membership Manager, Haleema Burton.

AAA is kicking the fall semester off with a special invitation to Department Services Program members for 30% off membership dues to your new faculty and students. As a benefit of DSP membership, this special invitation will provide substantial savings for both membership and registration rates for the upcoming 2014 AAA Annual Meeting in Washington, DC.

Here is an informational flyer that can be printed and posted or distributed. This is a limited time offer for first-time and lapsed (5 or more years) professional and student members who are affiliated with a DSP member that ends on October 15, 2014.

http://www.aaanet.org/membership/DSP-Members.cfm

Humanities E-Book releases Round 11

The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) released Round 11 of their online collection this August. These 353 titles bring the total of the volumes in the collection to 4,315. The new round includes additional titles from two of HEB’s original publishing partners, Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press, as well as books from new partners such as University of Toronto Press and Michigan State University Press.

All the titles in Humanities E-Book are available to American Anthropological Association members. The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) makes individual subscriptions available through standing membership in any of the 72 ACLS constituent societies.

The subscription offers unlimited access to 4,300 cross-searchable, full-text titles across the humanities and related social sciences. The titles in HEB have been selected and peer reviewed by ACLS constituent learned societies for their continued value in teaching and researching. The collection comprises both in- and out-of-print titles ranging from the 1880s through the present, and includes many prize-winning works.

Individual subscriptions are ideal for those whose school might not yet have an institutional subscription to HEB or for individual members of a learned society who might not be affiliated with a subscribing institution. (A full list of subscribing institutions can be found on the HEB website.) Individual subscriptions are USD $40.00 for a twelve-month subscription. AAA members can sign up via the HEB website.

For more information about individual subscriptions, contact subscriptions@hebook.org.

Join the Anthropology Delegation to Cuba

http://citizens.peopletopeople.com/OurPrograms/CAP/Pages/2015-Citizens-Graham-Cuba.aspxPeople to People Citizen Ambassador Programs is organizing a delegation of specialists in anthropology to travel to Cuba in January 2015. The delegation leader is Dr. Laura Graham, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Iowa, and we hope for a strong showing of anthropologists. A number of unique opportunities are planned, including dialogue with anthropology professionals in Cuba, and the opportunity to share techniques, training and anthropology principles. Cultural activities will highlight the sights and sounds of the country. You can find more information at www.PeopletoPeople.com/LauraGraham.

Travel to Cuba for U.S. citizens is very limited. Under license (CT-2013-305247-1) by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control, you can legally visit Cuba with Ambassador Programs, Inc. (People to People Ambassador Programs) if adhering to the guidelines outlined on the delegation’s website.

Doing “Consumer” Anthropology

Join Dr. Ken C. Erickson next Wednesday afternoon for Webinar Wednesday! Registration is required, webinar is free: http://bit.ly/1lU3FNY

KenDoing “Consumer” Anthropology, Warnings and Advice*

Whether its burgers or Boeing, anthropological technique and theory have found significant purchase in the business world. Sometimes. The questions Anthropologists ask often lead to discomfiting revisions in thinking about who buys products and services and what using or experiencing them means. Bringing anthropological stories to the enterprise table can even raise fundamental questions about the nature of business. Fundamental questions (about value, valuation, sustainability, and suffering caused by organizations, for example) need not be laid aside while asking and answering enterprise tactical questions. Using video examples and tales from the field, this webinar offers tips and tricks for finding an anthropological focus that can be heard and, sometimes, become levers to think about and change organizational practices.

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