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NAPA Explores “Anthropological Approaches to the Global Food Crisis”

The latest issue of NAPA Bulletin explores the effects of the world food crisis in various settings around the globe, and suggests ways to mitigate those effects through the application of anthropological principles and practices.

The result is a collection of articles which constitute a significant contribution, both theoretical and practical, to this important and ongoing discussion. According to the abstract of the issue introduction: 

The food riots and demonstrations that occurred in more than 50 countries in 2008 signaled the oncoming global economic recession. Skyrocketing food and fuel prices spurred on violence in poorer countries where there is no social safety net and in places impacted by food insecurity and malnutrition. 

Today, while the prices for some food staples have retracted a little, the deepening economic recession poses a threat in wealthier nations including the United States and members of the European Union. For example, the shuttering fall in the U.S. stock market in October 2008 resulted in the loss of billions of dollars not only to individual investors but also to states and local municipalities. In this environment, there is a potentially grave threat to the social safety net in the United States including food assistance programs. The World Food Program (WFP) has cited the increase in world food prices as the biggest challenge in its 45-year history, calling the impact a “silent tsunami” that threatened to plunge millions into hunger. 

In this volume, practicing and applied anthropologists examine the current global food crisis in a variety of settings including Belize, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Mozambique, Tanzania, and the United States. Further, they use a variety of theoretical orientations and methodological approaches to understand the chronic nature of food insecurity and the ways in which global food policies and economic restructuring have resulted in increasing food inequities across the globe. Throughout this volume, the authors make suggestions for combating the global food crisis through the application of anthropological principles and practices.

 

Featured articles include:

LAVICHÈ: HAITI’S VULNERABILITY TO THE GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS   John Mazzeo

FROM CRISIS TO CUMULATIVE EFFECTS: FOOD SECURITY CHALLENGES IN ALASKA  David V. Fazzino, Philip A. Loring

ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACHES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE COMPLEXITIES OF THE GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS  Sunil K. Khanna

THINGS BECAME SCARCE: FOOD AVAILABILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY IN SANTIAGO de CUBA THEN AND NOW   Hanna Garth

This issue of NAPA (and all NAPA issues from 1997 onward) is available FREE to everyone through December 2009; after that, it will be accessible to AAA members, Anthrosource subscribers, and via pay-per-view on Wiley-Interscience.

2 Responses

  1. [...] NAPA Explores “Anthropological Approaches to the Global Food Crisis” from American Anthropological Association by Oona & Sharon [...]

  2. [...] to the Global Food Crisis”, from the November 2009 NAPA Bulletin (Volume 32), which was dedicated to the Global Food Crisis, John Mazzeo explores the food crisis that hit Haiti in the spring of [...]

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