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Economic Anthropologists Join World’s Largest Professional Anthropology Association

SEA LogoThe American Anthropological Association (AAA) is pleased to announce that the Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) has merged with the AAA. The merger of the two groups became official on March 13 of this year, and former SEA members will now form a new section within the AAA, the Society for Economic Anthropology.

 In December, 2012, the membership of the American Anthropological Association voted to incorporate the Society for Economic Anthropology. In May of last year, SEA President, Katherine Browne formally proposed a merger of the two organizations by which SEA would cease to exist as a separate corporation and be folded into AAA as an unincorporated section of the association.

The SEA is a group of anthropologists, economists and other scholars who are interested in the connections between social and economic life.. In presenting the vote to with members, AAA President Leith Mullings noted, “This merger presents an opportunity for the AAA to expand its reach across an interdisciplinary and international spectrum, affirming the unique insights of a four field tradition”. Other benefits include the acquisition of a highly respected publication

The merger converts the highly respected SEA monograph series into a peer-reviewed journal, Economic Anthropology, to launch in January 2014 as the newest publication in the AAA publishing portfolio. Economic Anthropology expands the AAA’s coverage of issues that connect social and economic anthropology. The journal is devoted to publishing scholarship concerned with economic aspects of local and global life such as “urbanization”, “inequality” and “social change.” Economic Anthropology will also publish scholarship that addresses interconnections between scales of micro and macro study, and transformations in domains that include economic realities.

As a new AAA section, SEA will continue to offer its three prizes, the Halperin Memorial Fund, the Harold Schneider Prize, and the SEA Book Prize.  The SEA Rhoda Halperin Memorial Fund is a competitive annual prize awarded to three Ph.D. students in anthropology who demonstrate the late Dr. Halperin’s love of economic anthropology and her concern for people living on the margins. Students engaged in economic research focused on social exclusion and poverty are provided small dissertation research grants ($1,000) to help them develop their topics and proposals, and subsequent travel money ($500) to present their findings at the Society for Economic Anthropology annual spring conference. The Harold K. Schneider Prize Competition is an annual student paper competition established by the Society for Economic Anthropology to honor its first president and to encourage new scholars in the field of economic anthropology. The SEA Book Prize is awarded every two years to recognize the single best publication in the field of economic anthropology.

This new AAA section will also continue to hold an annual conference each spring. The 2013 SEA Annual Meeting will be held at Washington University in St. Louis, MO from April 11-14. This year’s conference brings together researchers from all fields of anthropology as well as other social sciences to present and discuss research that engages with the broad theme of inequality.

SEA President Browne, a professor of anthropology at Colorado State University, is excited for this shift within the society. “Thanks to the support and resources of the AAA, this merger prepares the way for our beloved SEA to expand its scholarly reach and visibility, and to connect to a broader public. We could not be more pleased about our new status” Browne notes.

AAA is pleased to welcome the Society for Economic Anthropology as one of its 40 sections.

AAA’s Society for Cultural Anthropology Paves New Way For Anthropological Publishing Program

CulAnth

In its latest efforts to respond to today’s evolving publishing climate the American Anthropological Association (AAA) celebrates the decision by one of its most influential sections to undertake efforts to expand the way its signature journal  is made available to scholars, researchers and the general public.

In 2012 the AAA Executive Board invited its sections to submit creative publishing proposals. The Society for Cultural Anthropology (SCA) responded with a proposal to transform Cultural Anthropology to an open access format. The plans, while still under development, will provide Cultural Anthropology at no charge to readers beginning in 2014.

While the publication will soon be available open access via Cultural Anthropology’s website, www.culanth.org, it will also remain available via AAA’s AnthroSource, the premier online portal serving the research, teaching and practicing needs of anthropologists.

AAA is very excited for the opportunity to test this format. This experiment will pave a path for the publishing program to learn best practices and responsible approaches towards a sustainable publishing model.

For additional details, please read the latest SCA press release.

Invitation for Award Nominations

Deadlines are approaching on the following AAA Awards -

March 15

Margaret Mead Award
This $1000 award is presented annually to a younger scholar for a particular accomplishment such as a book, film, monograph, or service, which interprets anthropological data and principles in ways that make them meaningful and accessible to a broadly concerned public.

AAA Leadership Fellows
Awarded annually and established to provide a unique opportunity for anthropologists early in their careers to learn about AAA and leadership opportunities and to encourage future leadership in the association. A $500 travel subsidy will be provided to attend the annual meeting.

Anthropology In Public Policy Award (AIPP)
The AAA Committee on Public Policy (CoPP) is pleased to announce the establishment of a biennial award, the AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award to honor anthropologists whose work has had a significant, positive influence on the course of government decision-making and action. Starting in 2013, this $500 award will be conferred every other year in rotation with the Kimball Award.

The following award nominations are due later in the year; however, early submissions are welcome.

May 1

CoGEA Award
Sponsored by the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology and awarded annually, recognizes individuals who have demonstrated the courage to bring to light and investigate practices in anthropology that are potentially discriminatory to women.

June 1

David M. Schneider Award
Throughout his life, David Schneider’s work on kinship, culture theory and American culture was provocative and iconoclastic. This $1000 award will be given annually in recognition of work that treats one or more of these topics in a fresh and innovative fashion.

Invitation for Award Nominations

Deadlines are approaching on the following AAA Awards -

February 15

AAA Minority Dissertation Fellowship
The AAA invites minority doctoral candidates in anthropology to apply for a dissertation writing fellowship of $10,000 awarded annually.

March 1

Franz Boas Award for Exemplary Service to Anthropology
This award is presented annually by the AAA to its members whose careers demonstrate extraordinary achievement that have well served the anthropological profession.

AAA/Oxford University Press Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching of Anthropology
This award given annually was established in 1997 to recognize teachers who have contributed to and encouraged the study of anthropology.

Anthropology in Media Award (AIME)
This award given annually was established in 1987 to recognize the successful communication of anthropology to the general public through the media.

Robert B Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology
This award given annually was established in 1998 to encourage and reward excellent contributions in the use of anthropological perspectives, theories, models and methods in an anticipatory mode.

March 15

Margaret Mead Award
This $1000 award is presented annually to a younger scholar for a particular accomplishment such as a book, film, monograph, or service, which interprets anthropological data and principles in ways that make them meaningful and accessible to a broadly concerned public.

AAA Leadership Fellows
Awarded annually and established to provide a unique opportunity for anthropologists early in their careers to learn about AAA and leadership opportunities and to encourage future leadership in the association. A $500 travel subsidy will be provided to attend the annual meeting.

The following award nominations are due later in the year; however, early submissions are welcome.

May 1

CoGEA Award
Sponsored by the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology and awarded annually, recognizes individuals who have demonstrated the courage to bring to light and investigate practices in anthropology that are potentially discriminatory to women.

June 1

David M. Schneider Award
Throughout his life, David Schneider’s work on kinship, culture theory and American culture was provocative and iconoclastic. This $1000 award will be given annually in recognition of work that treats one or more of these topics in a fresh and innovative fashion.

Parental Needs on Academic Campuses

Today’s post is a Memorandum from the Association for Feminist Anthropology’s Executive Board of Elected and Appointed Members.

The Association for Feminist Anthropology Executive Board consisting of elected and appointed members (the AFA Board) voices its concern for what appears to be a censure of breastfeeding and a lack of recognition of parental needs on academic campuses and in the wider society. Such problems have a long history, but recently were highlighted in the situation of an assistant professor of anthropology at American University who breastfed her baby during a class meeting.

As feminist anthropologists, we contend that: 1) breastfeeding should not be stigmatized or hidden from view, and indeed should be considered a basic human right; 2) breastfeeding is not inherently unprofessional or distracting, and increased recognition of how the demands of infant care, and of breastfeeding in particular, shape the challenges parents face in the workplace is crucial for improving conditions for all families;  3) childcare needs on campuses tend to marginalize and create obstacles to parents of all genders seeking educational and career mobility as students, faculty, and staff;  4) campus needs for childcare, including services to care for sick children, deserve more consideration by institutions, unions, and policymakers.

We urge others to join us in using this incident as a ‘teachable moment’ that fosters critical analysis and education by feminist anthropologists and others, and promotes political mobilization.

- The AFA Board (Jane Henrici, Ellen Lewin, Lynn Kwiatkowski, Sandra Faiman-Silva, Nia Parson, Margot Weiss, Holly Dygert, Susan B. Hyatt, Sophie Bjork-James, Susan Harper-Bisso, Jennifer Patico, Jamie Sherman. Amy Harper, Jessica Smith Rolston, Damla Isik, and Rebecca Boucher)

New Blog by the Anthropology & Environment Society

This post is written by Rebecca Garvoille.

ENGAGEMENT—a new blog published by the Anthropology & Environment Society—features compelling, first-hand accounts by anthropologists and other social scientists whose work directly addresses pressing social and environmental problems.

AES is pleased to announce the publication of our second post, “Getting Goats,” in which Dr. Carolyn Lesorogol (Washington University) takes us to northern Kenya for a look at her work promoting sustainable development among Samburu pastoralists. This post follows Brandon Nida’s account of his work as an anti-mining organizer in West Virginia. Upcoming contributors include Dvera Saxton on the local food movement in California, Tom Sheridan on ranching and conservation in the American West, Jim Igoe on the greening of uranium and Paige West on the broader impacts of her new book on the social world of coffee.

For more information on ENGAGEMENT or to submit a contribution, please contact blog editors Rebecca Garvoille (rgarv001@fiu.edu) and Noah Theriault (theriault@wisc.edu).

SLACA Spring Meeting 2013 in Merida, Mexico

Today’s guest blog post is by Gabriela Vargas-Cetina and Steffan Igor Ayora-Diaz.

Photo Courtesy SLACA

The Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA) announces its Fourth Spring Conference, to be held at the Autonomous University of Yucatan, in Merida, Mexico, March 20, 21 and 22, 2013.  This exciting conference will take place in beautiful Yucatan, under the theme Post-National Transformations: Culture and Politics in the Greater Latin America and the Caribbean.  We invite anthropologists in all anthropological sub-disciplines, to submit 500-word abstracts.  Registration will take place through the website of the American Anthropological Association in January 2013.

Merida is a beautiful, safe and culturally vibrant city in Eastern Mexico.  There are direct flights via Houston, Cancun or Mexico City, and it can also be reached by bus from Cancun’s international airport.

Important deadlines: September 31, 2012, submission of abstracts and sessions; November 1, 2012, announcement of the pre-selected abstracts and sessions; November 2, registration for the conference begins, through the AAA site; January 15, deadline to register for the conference; March 1st, 2013, publication of the preliminary program; March 20th, beginning of the Conference in Merida, Mexico.

Further information: Visit the SLACA Meetings webpage.

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