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The 2014 Annual Meeting Mobile App has arrived!

Print I’m sure you’ve all be waiting with baited breath for the official release of this year’s annual meeting mobile application.  There are quite a few search-ability enhancements you’ll all appreciate. Be sure to take advantage of the communication and scheduling options as well.

I wanted to take some time specifically to address an issue we had last year, which was availability to recently registered attendees.  While we would like to provide you with instantaneous access to this amazing app, it isn’t always feasible.  I won’t bore you with details, but there will be a lag between the time you’ve registered and the time you have access to the mobile app. With any luck this will be mitigated to an hour or so. If you go a day without having access to the mobile app, then you might want to contact one of the staff (who will probably direct you to me).  You patience during this process is greatly appreciate, as we are a constantly evolving (and hopefully improving) association.

For example, I just ran the attendee list. So if you registered after 11/24/2014, then you will likely not be on the mobile app list until the next update is done, which will be tomorrow.

Without further delay, you can pick your app up on the iTunes Store or the Android Store. We don’t have a Windows App or one for Blackberry, but if there’s enough of a demand, I’ll try and get something together for next year.

New booklet and installation showcase popular anthropology

Today’s guest blog post is by Erin Taylor and Gawain Lynch.

Where are anthropologists publishing these days? Most of us probably know that Gillian Tett writes for The Financial Times and Sarah Kenzidor for Al Jazeera. Paul Stoller has a column in The Huffington Post, and there is also the AAA’s Huffington Post blog. We occasionally stumble across various other articles penned by anthropologists.

A couple of years ago we began searching for anthropology that is written for a public audience. We now have a rather long and impressive list, and we’ve only just uncovered the tip of the iceberg. Around the world, we’ve found anthropologists publishing in places like The Guardian, The Conversation, Nigerians Talk, the Jamaica Gleaner, The Big Issue, O Magazine, Psychology Today, Scientific American, and many more.

But most of use aren’t aware of the extent of popular writing that anthropologists do – not even those of us who do it ourselves. This limits anthropology’s’ potential public voice.

We can change this by learning more about who is doing popular anthropology and by building connections between us.

First, if we share each other’s public work, we help to lift anthropology’s public profile. This helps anthropology have an influential voice in society. It also helps us as individuals: greater visibility for anthropology means that it will be easier to make our own voices heard.

Second, if we know who is writing for the public, we can learn from them. There are many anthropologists who believe that public communication is important and we write regularly on our own blogs. But these have a limited audience, and it’s hard to figure out how to take the next step. We need more avenues for mentorship and learning.

Third, if we network and collaborate as popular writers, we have a stronger bargaining position when it comes to our promotional committees and workplaces, who might not see the value in writing for the public. Most of us who produce popular anthropology do so as individuals. This makes it difficult to convince our workplaces need to understand that contributing to anthropology’s public profile has many benefits. But a show of force can change how popular anthropology is valued.

How do we do this? As a first step, we are running an installation at the AAA meetings in Washington D.C. on Friday 5 December. It will feature short talks by Agustín Fuentes, Rosemary Joyce, and Greg Downey. We’ll show a video of interviews with popular anthropologists, produced by Natalia Reagan from the BOAS network. And you’ll get to participate, too, as the bulk of the installation will be taken up by a Town Hall meeting.

In preparation for our installation, we’re pleased to launch “Showcasing_Popular_Anthropology”(PDF), a compilation of short articles published in newspapers and blogs. It includes contributions from Sarah Kenzidor, Joris Luyendijk, Keith Hart, Dori Tunstall, Susan Blum, Helen Fisher, Vito Laterza, Olimide Abimbola, Agustín Fuentes, Rosemary Joyce, Greg Downey. At the back is a list of further reading to help you learn more about who is doing what and where.

This is just the beginning of the conversation, and taking it further will require a collaborative effort. So, if you will be in Washington D.C., come along and tell us what you think we can do to help popular anthropologists to join forces. If you can’t make it to the AAA meetings, you can still get in contact with the many anthropologists who are doing public work. Communicating among ourselves is an important step on our path to communicating with broader publics.

Practicing, Applied & Public Anthropology: Sessions of Interest

Today’s guest blog post is by the Committee on Practicing, Applied and Public Interest Anthropology (CoPAPIA). NOTE: All rooms are at the Marriott Wardman Park, unless indicated otherwise. Check program for NAPA-sponsored workshops and to confirm times and places of listed sessions.

Wednesday, December 3

Paradox and Resolution in Consumer Research
8 pm—9:45 pm Delaware Suite B

Thursday, December 4

Producing Anthropology and Tourism: Practicing Anthropologists in the Tourism Sector
11 am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 5

Spinning Anthropology in the Anthropocene: Integrating Theoretical & Applied Approaches to Meet the Challenge of Climate Change
Part 1 9am—10:45 am Marriott Balcony B Part 2 2:30 pm—4:15 pm Harding Room

Pathways and Approaches to Practicing Anthropology in Veteran and Military Health Services Research
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Five Fields Update
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Delaware Suite B

Friday, December 5

9th Annual NAPA/AAA Careers Expo: Exploring Professional Careers
11am—4:00 pm Exhibit Hall C

Producing the Anthropology of Policy Across the Discipline
11am—12:45 pm Delaware Suite A (sponsored by CoPAPIA and ASAP)

Public Policy Forum on Indigenous Educational Policy in the U.S.
11am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 2

Producing Health Policy with Anthropology: Case Studies of Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Policy
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite A

Producing Anthropology in Evaluation: Connecting Culture, Equity, Value, and Program Effectiveness
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Marriott Balcony B

“Producing Anthropology” Through Community Engagement
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Honoring J. Anthony Paredes (1939-2013): Ethnologist, Applied Anthropologist, and Friend
2:30pm—4:15 pm Wilson A

The Practice of Anthropology: Consider the Past, Focus on the Future
6:30 pm—8:15 pm Jackson Room

Saturday, December 6

Critical Issues in Anthropology: Constructing Local Practitioner Networks
9 am—10:45 am Washington Room 1 (sponsored by CoPAPIA)

Engaging Anthropology: Experiences from Scandinavia
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall East

Medical Anthropologists in Dept of Veteran Affairs: Our Network, Collaboration, and Methods
9 am—10:45 am Johnson Room

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Life in the Federal Government
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall South

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Private Sector Applications
11 am—12:45 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

NAPA Networking Event: Producing Connections through Conversations
1 pm—2:15 pm Marriott Ballroom Salon 2

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: International Development Opportunities
2:30 pm – 4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 5

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Student Experiences
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 1

Negotiating Public Policy: Actors, Knowledge, and Contested Political Fields
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

But Is It Science? Producing Justice-Oriented Ethnography of Education for Varied Publics
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Palladian Ballroom (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

Sunday, December 7

The Relevance of Anthropology: Using Anthropological Theory & Methods to Address Complex Questions
8 am—9:45 am Taylor Room

Research Methods, Media Campaigns, and Collaboration: Innovative Approaches in Applied Anthropology
10 am—11:45 am Marriott Balcony B

Understanding Community in the [Applied] Anthropological Context
12 pm—1:45 pm Marriott Balcony B

Negotiating Boundaries and Contesting Terrain: Anthropological Knowledge in Legal Settings
12 pm—1:45 pm Virginia Suite B

 

Making More Connections at Your Annual Meeting

Today’s guest blog post is written by Guven Peter Witteveen.

Conferences normally have consisted of formal sessions, informal shoptalk, and hatching ideas with a mix of well-known and new colleagues. The events last a few days and then the momentum fades a few days later when the catch up work at home faces you. With a view to extending the period of conference enthusiasm and contagious ideas, this year in keeping with the “Producing Anthropology” theme we would like to encourage presenters, attendees, and those unable to be physically present to share part of their work for a few days before the Annual Meeting, during events, and a few weeks after the conference. That way it will be possible to interact with the authors, ideas, and source materials beyond the face to face time of a given session.

Online services make it easy to share your presentation, abstract, bibliography and resource links, draft writings [marked not for citation], images and video or audio clips. The idea underlying this online initiative is for you to be in charge of your own material in full or in abbreviated form at a hosting place of your choosing (personal account, workplace webspace, or one of the free online services -see a summary of several usefully scholarly services at http://bit.ly/2013tools). Then you submit a link to that sharable material at a single, one-stop input form so that anyone can browse the resulting list of authors’ links and choose to interact with the thinkers and materials of their choosing.

Ultimately the authors of the materials who have uploaded their things will control how long the files are viewable, but the one-stop list of this Annual Meeting’s materials makes a simple way to centralize things. This project to gather links to your materials is not an archive. There is no permanence. That would be a job for archive.org. Instead this online page is intended to streamline the sharing of presented subjects and related materials in the run-up to the Annual Meeting and for a few weeks following the event.

So no matter if you are scheduled to present a numbered scientific session, speak at a round-table, create a poster session, or attend a section event on-site or off-site, please feel free to share your materials by uploading to a place of your choosing and then giving the link to the material at http://tinyurl.com/2014aaalinks or view the cumulative results submitted in the days to come at http://goo.gl/4Q6OZE.

Guven Witteveen belongs to Society for East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) and works with colleagues to produce more and better outreach beyond campus. Some of his work is linked from www.linkedin.com/in/anthroview.

Format for December 4th Members’ Open Forum on Engagement with Israel and Palestine

Today’s guest blog post is written by Ed Liebow, Executive Director.

Last July’s Anthropology News mentioned a variety of ways in which AAA leadership is trying to foster dialogue and information exchange among AAA members on anthropologically relevant issues related to Israel/Palestine. We mentioned there that an Open Forum would be held at the Annual Meeting; it has now been scheduled for Thursday 4 December, from 13:00 to 14:15 in the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Ballroom Salon 2. Our goal is to facilitate dialogue among AAA Members, bringing to bear on the conversation the culture of inquiry and analytical skills characteristic of our profession.

The frame for the discussion is: what issues related to Israel/Palestine are relevant to us as anthropologists, as members of a scholarly association, and to the AAA as an association of anthropologists?

Here is what you can expect at the Open Forum. The hall will be arranged with a number of tables; the hall is large and we can accommodate many small groups. You will be encouraged to sit with people you do not already know well. There will be introductory remarks from Monica Heller, the AAA President, a brief update on the work of the AAA Task Force on Engagement on Issues related to Israel/Palestine by the Task Force chair, AAA Past-President Don Brenneis, and a short explanation of the forum’s format by our lead facilitator, Tarek Maassarani. The process will include an opening round to build trust and familiarity amongst participants; several discussion rounds with prompts to share what questions, knowledge, perspectives, and experiences participants bring to the table; and a reflective closing round to share insights and their relevance beyond this one event.

Participants will also be given index cards that they can place in feedback boxes as they leave the room. Facilitators will be asked to fill out a reflection form immediately following the dialogue to help us better understand what happened at each table. If there is time, we might be able to hear from some of the facilitators before we need to vacate the room. Since the objective at this stage is to foster dialogue among members, we will check badges at the entrance. Executive Board members, Task Force members, Section Assembly leadership and AAA staff will likely attend as observers. We will ask the press to respect our privacy during the Forum, though we are happy for participants to speak to the press (or blog or tweet) before and after the event. We are also open to considering further such events, whether open only to members or not.

AAA 2014 Annual Photo Contest Voting Period Ending Tonight

Hello all! The photo contest voting period is coming to an end tonight at midnight (Eastern Time). Get your votes in now.  We will than proceed to the staff voting and production phase to produce the calendar.

If you do not wish to use Facebook for voting, please email photos@aaanet.org, no votes will be counted which have been submitted after midnight (Eastern Time) tonight.

I want to thank all the amazing photographers who have submitted this year.  We got more submission and votes this year than any previous year, each provoking and imaginative.  Thanks to your votes we will be narrowing down the photographs until we have 12 for our calendar (Ideally 4 from each of the categories). Then we will be producing the calendar, which will be given out at the annual meeting, or by request after the annual meeting.

If you are one of the photographers selected for the calendar, please email photos@aaanet.org, so we can send you the desired number of calendars.  There is a limited amount being produced this year, so please request early!

Early workshops registration ends soon, so register now for workshops!

Today’s guest blog post is by Dr. Sabrina Nichelle Scott. Dr. Scott is a consumer anthropologist, and she is the Chair of the NAPA Workshops Committee.

113th AAA Annual MeetingWorkshops registration is now available. Unlike last year, workshops begin on the first day of the AAA Annual Meeting on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 and end on Saturday, December 7, 2014. It is exciting to have the opportunity to choose from over 40 workshops from various sections within AAA with 12 of those workshops offered by the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology (NAPA). Complete workshop descriptions and convenient online registration are available at http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/Workshops.cfm. Early workshops registration ends soon, so register now to guarantee your seat. I look forward to seeing you in DC!

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