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Webinar Wednesday: March 4th, 2015 with Mary Butler

March 4th, 2015: Partnering Anthropology and Evaluation:What do we gain? A presentation by Mary Butler

Mary_Butler_website_headshot

 Abstract

This webinar will look at how evaluation and anthropology can be mapped onto each other to create Evaluation Anthropology, an approach to value questions that is stronger than either approach alone for evaluations of programs that are culturally embedded. We will look at how evaluation and anthropology reinforce one another, building methods and theories in Evaluation Anthropology and how our training as anthropologists supports out work as evaluators.

1.What is Evaluation Anthropology and how do we use it?

2.The contribution of evaluation

3.The contribution of evaluation

4.Building Theory: The role of science

5.Building Methods: The role of ethnography

6.Pitfalls: Common problems with client assumptions

7.Evaluation Planning: One way to do it.

8.Mixed Methods: Synthesis of Qualitative and Quantitative Data

9.What qualifies anthropologists to do Evaluation Anthropology

10.What skills do I need to add.

Bio

Mary Odell Butler is an anthropologist-evaluator with 35 years of experience in research design, management, and supervision of evaluations and other research projects and 12 years of university teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels.She has special expertise in program evaluation, evaluation research, and case study methods and have conducted numerous projects for CDC, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and private foundations.

She is employed by Westat as a Senior Analyst supporting work in public health program evaluation.She is retired from twenty years as a Research Leader and Office Director at the Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation.She is an adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland and at the University of North Texas. In this capacity she teaches graduate courses in evaluation.Among her publications is Evaluation: A Culture Systems Approach, in press for release in summer 2015 and Creating Evaluation Anthropology: Introducing and Emerging Sub-Field (NAPA Bulletin 24, 2005)

Registration is now open here and be sure to add it to your calendar! As usual the password is anthro.

2015 AAA Annual Meeting Registration and Refund Details

While the annual meeting (Denver, CO November 18th this year) is still far away, it is never too early to start planning for the event.  After all, the invited/volunteer call for papers deadline is April 15th.  This year we are introducing a three tiered registration system: Call for Papers, Pre-Registration, and On-Site Registration.  Each of these categories is open to any attendee– presenting or not– and we encourage everyone to register early.  Registering in the call for papers period will give you a discounted registration rate, and it’ll also help us in the planning process.  The Call for Paper’s registration rate ends when the Call for Papers submission period ends, so don’t wait!  After that we switch into Pre-Registration, which will extend to October 31st, at which times On-Site rates apply.  Now you might be saying, “The conference doesn’t start until the 18th, why are On-Site rates starting on November 1st?” And this is a valid question.  For the most part, it once again boils down to planning, logistics, and shipping costs.

As part of the AAA’s ongoing effort to be an environmentally conscious organization, we will again be offering the GREEN registration.  This means you get a discount, but also are making an active choice to cut down on the AAA’s paper use by not having a printed program (last year’s program was 680 pages!).  Green Registration is available in the Call for Papers and Pre-Registration periods.  Everyone will have access to our mobile app, which holds a searchable program, maps, a messaging system, and much more– details to come on that in the September.  Below you will find the current rates, broken down by registration type.

Professional Member Registration $231
Professional Member GREEN Registration $226
Student Member Registration $100
Student Member GREEN Registration $96
Un- or underemployed Member Registration $193
Un- or underemployed Member GREEN Registration $189
Retired Member Registration $193
Retired Member GREEN Registration $189
Professional Non-Member Registration $407
Professional Non-Member GREEN Registration $403
Student Non-Member Registration

$175

Student Non-Member GREEN Registration $171

If you would like to register now, please click here.

Many members felt our refund policy was confusing, so with that in mind, we set about revamping it.  With that in mind, please familiarize yourself with the AAA’s official refund policy below:

Requests for refunds or cancellations must be made in writing. Prior to the April 15, 2015 deadline, proposals may be withdrawn by sending an email to aaameetings@aaanet.org. Between April 16, 2015, and October 15, 2015, a written refund request will be subject to a $25 administrative fee, except for persons who submitted a proposal that was not accepted for the final program.

Program participant registration fees are non-refundable; cancellations will not be accepted nor refunds issued.

No refunds will be granted for requests received after October 15, 2015. Under no circumstances will AAA issue refunds for no-shows.  Badge sharing, splitting, and reprints are strictly prohibited.

If you registered as a non-member with a membership requirement exemption and decide to join AAA, the registration conversion can be accommodated within 30 days of the original transaction.

All this information and more can be found in the meetings section of the AAA website: http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/

If you have any questions, please send them to aaameetings@aaanet.org, we’ll be happy to address them.

AAA & CASCA To Hold Joint Conference in 2019

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to announce that together with CASCA (Canadian Anthropology Society/Société canadienne d’anthropologie), we will hold a joint conference November 20-24, 2019, in Vancouver, British Columbia. This conference will allow for the development of multiple forms of collaboration between the two associations. We are grateful to the joint committee whose work was critical to the getting the conference off the ground. Conference details forthcoming.

La CASCA (Canadian Anthropology Society/Société canadienne d’anthropologie) et la AAA (American Anthropological Association) tiendront un colloque commun à Vancouver (C.-B.) du 20 au 24 novembre, 2019. Ce colloque permettra de multiplier les possibilités de collaboration entre les deux associations. Nous remercions le comité conjoint qui nous a permis de le mettre sur pied. L’appel sera diffusé selon le calendrier habituel.

The 2014 Annual Meeting Mobile App has arrived!

Print I’m sure you’ve all be waiting with baited breath for the official release of this year’s annual meeting mobile application.  There are quite a few search-ability enhancements you’ll all appreciate. Be sure to take advantage of the communication and scheduling options as well.

I wanted to take some time specifically to address an issue we had last year, which was availability to recently registered attendees.  While we would like to provide you with instantaneous access to this amazing app, it isn’t always feasible.  I won’t bore you with details, but there will be a lag between the time you’ve registered and the time you have access to the mobile app. With any luck this will be mitigated to an hour or so. If you go a day without having access to the mobile app, then you might want to contact one of the staff (who will probably direct you to me).  You patience during this process is greatly appreciate, as we are a constantly evolving (and hopefully improving) association.

For example, I just ran the attendee list. So if you registered after 11/24/2014, then you will likely not be on the mobile app list until the next update is done, which will be tomorrow.

Without further delay, you can pick your app up on the iTunes Store or the Android Store. We don’t have a Windows App or one for Blackberry, but if there’s enough of a demand, I’ll try and get something together for next year.

New booklet and installation showcase popular anthropology

Today’s guest blog post is by Erin Taylor and Gawain Lynch.

Where are anthropologists publishing these days? Most of us probably know that Gillian Tett writes for The Financial Times and Sarah Kenzidor for Al Jazeera. Paul Stoller has a column in The Huffington Post, and there is also the AAA’s Huffington Post blog. We occasionally stumble across various other articles penned by anthropologists.

A couple of years ago we began searching for anthropology that is written for a public audience. We now have a rather long and impressive list, and we’ve only just uncovered the tip of the iceberg. Around the world, we’ve found anthropologists publishing in places like The Guardian, The Conversation, Nigerians Talk, the Jamaica Gleaner, The Big Issue, O Magazine, Psychology Today, Scientific American, and many more.

But most of use aren’t aware of the extent of popular writing that anthropologists do – not even those of us who do it ourselves. This limits anthropology’s’ potential public voice.

We can change this by learning more about who is doing popular anthropology and by building connections between us.

First, if we share each other’s public work, we help to lift anthropology’s public profile. This helps anthropology have an influential voice in society. It also helps us as individuals: greater visibility for anthropology means that it will be easier to make our own voices heard.

Second, if we know who is writing for the public, we can learn from them. There are many anthropologists who believe that public communication is important and we write regularly on our own blogs. But these have a limited audience, and it’s hard to figure out how to take the next step. We need more avenues for mentorship and learning.

Third, if we network and collaborate as popular writers, we have a stronger bargaining position when it comes to our promotional committees and workplaces, who might not see the value in writing for the public. Most of us who produce popular anthropology do so as individuals. This makes it difficult to convince our workplaces need to understand that contributing to anthropology’s public profile has many benefits. But a show of force can change how popular anthropology is valued.

How do we do this? As a first step, we are running an installation at the AAA meetings in Washington D.C. on Friday 5 December. It will feature short talks by Agustín Fuentes, Rosemary Joyce, and Greg Downey. We’ll show a video of interviews with popular anthropologists, produced by Natalia Reagan from the BOAS network. And you’ll get to participate, too, as the bulk of the installation will be taken up by a Town Hall meeting.

In preparation for our installation, we’re pleased to launch “Showcasing_Popular_Anthropology”(PDF), a compilation of short articles published in newspapers and blogs. It includes contributions from Sarah Kenzidor, Joris Luyendijk, Keith Hart, Dori Tunstall, Susan Blum, Helen Fisher, Vito Laterza, Olimide Abimbola, Agustín Fuentes, Rosemary Joyce, Greg Downey. At the back is a list of further reading to help you learn more about who is doing what and where.

This is just the beginning of the conversation, and taking it further will require a collaborative effort. So, if you will be in Washington D.C., come along and tell us what you think we can do to help popular anthropologists to join forces. If you can’t make it to the AAA meetings, you can still get in contact with the many anthropologists who are doing public work. Communicating among ourselves is an important step on our path to communicating with broader publics.

Practicing, Applied & Public Anthropology: Sessions of Interest

Today’s guest blog post is by the Committee on Practicing, Applied and Public Interest Anthropology (CoPAPIA). NOTE: All rooms are at the Marriott Wardman Park, unless indicated otherwise. Check program for NAPA-sponsored workshops and to confirm times and places of listed sessions.

Wednesday, December 3

Paradox and Resolution in Consumer Research
8 pm—9:45 pm Delaware Suite B

Thursday, December 4

Producing Anthropology and Tourism: Practicing Anthropologists in the Tourism Sector
11 am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 5

Spinning Anthropology in the Anthropocene: Integrating Theoretical & Applied Approaches to Meet the Challenge of Climate Change
Part 1 9am—10:45 am Marriott Balcony B Part 2 2:30 pm—4:15 pm Harding Room

Pathways and Approaches to Practicing Anthropology in Veteran and Military Health Services Research
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Five Fields Update
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Delaware Suite B

Friday, December 5

9th Annual NAPA/AAA Careers Expo: Exploring Professional Careers
11am—4:00 pm Exhibit Hall C

Producing the Anthropology of Policy Across the Discipline
11am—12:45 pm Delaware Suite A (sponsored by CoPAPIA and ASAP)

Public Policy Forum on Indigenous Educational Policy in the U.S.
11am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 2

Producing Health Policy with Anthropology: Case Studies of Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Policy
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite A

Producing Anthropology in Evaluation: Connecting Culture, Equity, Value, and Program Effectiveness
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Marriott Balcony B

“Producing Anthropology” Through Community Engagement
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Honoring J. Anthony Paredes (1939-2013): Ethnologist, Applied Anthropologist, and Friend
2:30pm—4:15 pm Wilson A

The Practice of Anthropology: Consider the Past, Focus on the Future
6:30 pm—8:15 pm Jackson Room

Saturday, December 6

Critical Issues in Anthropology: Constructing Local Practitioner Networks
9 am—10:45 am Washington Room 1 (sponsored by CoPAPIA)

Engaging Anthropology: Experiences from Scandinavia
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall East

Medical Anthropologists in Dept of Veteran Affairs: Our Network, Collaboration, and Methods
9 am—10:45 am Johnson Room

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Life in the Federal Government
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall South

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Private Sector Applications
11 am—12:45 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

NAPA Networking Event: Producing Connections through Conversations
1 pm—2:15 pm Marriott Ballroom Salon 2

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: International Development Opportunities
2:30 pm – 4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 5

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Student Experiences
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 1

Negotiating Public Policy: Actors, Knowledge, and Contested Political Fields
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

But Is It Science? Producing Justice-Oriented Ethnography of Education for Varied Publics
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Palladian Ballroom (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

Sunday, December 7

The Relevance of Anthropology: Using Anthropological Theory & Methods to Address Complex Questions
8 am—9:45 am Taylor Room

Research Methods, Media Campaigns, and Collaboration: Innovative Approaches in Applied Anthropology
10 am—11:45 am Marriott Balcony B

Understanding Community in the [Applied] Anthropological Context
12 pm—1:45 pm Marriott Balcony B

Negotiating Boundaries and Contesting Terrain: Anthropological Knowledge in Legal Settings
12 pm—1:45 pm Virginia Suite B

 

Making More Connections at Your Annual Meeting

Today’s guest blog post is written by Guven Peter Witteveen.

Conferences normally have consisted of formal sessions, informal shoptalk, and hatching ideas with a mix of well-known and new colleagues. The events last a few days and then the momentum fades a few days later when the catch up work at home faces you. With a view to extending the period of conference enthusiasm and contagious ideas, this year in keeping with the “Producing Anthropology” theme we would like to encourage presenters, attendees, and those unable to be physically present to share part of their work for a few days before the Annual Meeting, during events, and a few weeks after the conference. That way it will be possible to interact with the authors, ideas, and source materials beyond the face to face time of a given session.

Online services make it easy to share your presentation, abstract, bibliography and resource links, draft writings [marked not for citation], images and video or audio clips. The idea underlying this online initiative is for you to be in charge of your own material in full or in abbreviated form at a hosting place of your choosing (personal account, workplace webspace, or one of the free online services -see a summary of several usefully scholarly services at http://bit.ly/2013tools). Then you submit a link to that sharable material at a single, one-stop input form so that anyone can browse the resulting list of authors’ links and choose to interact with the thinkers and materials of their choosing.

Ultimately the authors of the materials who have uploaded their things will control how long the files are viewable, but the one-stop list of this Annual Meeting’s materials makes a simple way to centralize things. This project to gather links to your materials is not an archive. There is no permanence. That would be a job for archive.org. Instead this online page is intended to streamline the sharing of presented subjects and related materials in the run-up to the Annual Meeting and for a few weeks following the event.

So no matter if you are scheduled to present a numbered scientific session, speak at a round-table, create a poster session, or attend a section event on-site or off-site, please feel free to share your materials by uploading to a place of your choosing and then giving the link to the material at http://tinyurl.com/2014aaalinks or view the cumulative results submitted in the days to come at http://goo.gl/4Q6OZE.

Guven Witteveen belongs to Society for East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) and works with colleagues to produce more and better outreach beyond campus. Some of his work is linked from www.linkedin.com/in/anthroview.

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