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Join the This is Anthropology Team at the Annual Meeting!

Over 390 anthropologists have joined the AAA’s new public outreach website, www.thisisanthropology.org since it launched in November 2012! Thanks to all of you who already contributed photos and profiles to the website. This is Anthropology is always a work in progress and it is not too late to join. The development team for This Is Anthropology will be at the annual meeting in Chicago with even more new ways for you to participate. We hope you’ll join us at the events below:

Opening Reception

Join us at our booth during the Opening Reception in the Exhibit Hall on Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 from 6:15-7:30 PM. In addition to the food and fun of the reception, we will be on hand with This is Anthropology swag (while supplies last!) and we’ll have our cameras rolling to capture some impromptu video interviews.

This is Anthropology Booth

Even if you can’t join us at the reception, stop by our booth in the Exhibit Hall to learn more about the website and how you can be a part of This is Anthropology. It’s never too late to create a profile on the site or to share TIA in your community.

Reaching A Broader Public: The “This Is Anthropology” Project Roundtable

Join Jason Miller and Charlotte Noble on Friday, Nov. 22, 2013 from 12:15-1:30 PM in Hilton Conference Room 4M for a roundtable about the This is Anthropology project. After a brief discussion of the origin and goals of the site, we will open the floor for comments, feedback and a brainstorming of ideas for how to disseminate anthropology to a broader public.

Video Project

Finally, be on the look out for our roving camera crew during the meeting. We’re looking for anthropologists to answer one of five questions about anthropology on camera. The footage will be used to create short videos about what anthropology is, anthropological skills and careers and how to become an anthropologist.

Have further questions? Contact the TIA team at thisisanthropology@aaanet.org or participate in our conversations at #thisisanthro on Twitter!

AAA Plenary Session – ReImagining Education

Today’s guest blog post is by Malcolm London. London called the Gil-Scott Heron of this generation by Cornel West, is a young Chicago poet, activist & educator. Malcolm appears on PBS for the first TED Talk television program with John Legend & Bill Gates. Malcolm has shared stages with actor Matt Damon & Lupe Fiasco as a part of the The People Speak, Live! cast. Appears on Season 2 of TVOne’s Verses & Flow. Winner of Louder Than A Bomb Youth Poetry Festival 2011 and once a member of the Youth Adult Council at Steppenwolf Theatre. He is now a member of UCAN’s National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention & Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission. A passionate educator through Young Chicago Authors & Northwestern Legal Clinic apart of Rights to Power project where he visits communities introducing poetry workshops and performances linked to juvenile & social justice to hundreds of youth every year.

Malcolm LondonNo building has a story without a foundation. If we are building a future where the sky’s the limit, one without ceilings, one where all our children are heading in the right direction–upward–we must have a strong foundation. Join panelist Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, Lila Leff,  founder of Umoja Student Development Corporation, Dr. Sofia Villenas, Associate Professor at Cornell University and myself, TED Speaker and educator through Young Chicago Authors and Northwestern Legal Clinic, as we discuss the necessary need for our culture, our true histories and our stories to be the foundations of our everyday curriculums. I encourage you to come out to the American Anthropological Association’s 112th Annual Meeting plenary session located at Hilton Hotel International Ballroom North (720 Michigan Avenue) November 20th, Wednesday evening at 6:00pm as we reimagine education.

We will be joined by four incredibly talented students I’ve been working with for the past two years from Simeon Career Academy’s poetry club, Writers Never Die, started by school counselor Patrick Kirkwood and teacher Lisa Roule, who will perform spoken word pieces at the AAA Plenary. As a Chicagoan and young organizer in this beautiful city, with beautiful buildings, I know its’ crumbling. Only half of the public school students’ graduate (that’s a failing grade) and public funding has and is taking a hard hit in this city, and nationally. While my work as an activist is to find out who is doing the punching, on this evening we will come together to inspire, challenge, invigorate and engage in fruitful dialogue as anthropologist, educators, students, parents, all loving human beings in hopes to continue to build toward the sky, while remembering and re-examining our histories, our foundations so we can reimagine our stories, and our education.

Add Installations To Your #AAA2013 Schedule

AAA2013Installations (a remix and rebirth of “InnoVents” and “Salons” introduced to the AAA Annual Meetings program in recent years) invite anthropological knowledge off the beaten path of the written conference paper. Like work shared in art venues, presentations selected as part of the AAA Installations program will draw on movement, sight, sound, smell, and taste to dwell on the haptic and engage AAA members and meeting attendees in a diverse world of the senses. Installations are curated for off-site exhibition and tied to the official AAA conference program. They offer attendees an opportunity to learn from a range of vested interests not typically encountered or easily found on the traditional AAA program. Installations are meant to disrupt who and what we tend to see at the Annual Meetings, helping attendees encounter new people and to do different kinds of things at the intersections of anthropological arts, sciences, and cultural expression.

To register for the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting, click here. Most Installations do not require additional registration; however, there are a few that do and are indicated below.

Wednesday, November 20

2-0010 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

2-0195 ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
12:00 – 03:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

2-0660 SHADOWS THEN LIGHT: CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE FOR IMMIGRANT JUSTICE
05:30 – 07:30 Latino Cultural Center Univ of IL 803 S. Morgan St., Lecture Center B2
Abstract: We present to you an art installation birthed from struggle, hoping that it may point us to new freedoms guided by stories and vivencias of the undocumented community. Join us with the UIC Latino Cultural Center for an evening of art, poetry and storytelling for immigrant justice.

Thursday, November 21

3-0316 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

3-0925RETHINKING REPRESENTATIONS AND ACTION AT the FIELD MUSEUM
02:00 – 04:00 Field Museum
Abstract: We will use the Contemporary Urban Collections project and Restoring Earth exhibition to illustrate museum practice that aims to re-present the Chicago region, drawing people into new patterns of civic action. A dialogue will consider the effectiveness of such approaches and wider themes of constancy and change in the civic role of museums.

3-1160 AUSTERITY, INEQUALITY, AND RESISTANCE in the URBAN MIDWEST: A COMMUNITY/ACTIVIST DIALOGUE
04:00 – 06:00 Jane Addams
Abstract:In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation bring together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community activists in conversation.

3-1245 GOING PUBLIC WITH LITERARY ETHNOGRAPHY IN THE WINDY CITY: ANTHROPOLOGISTS AND CHICAGO ARTISTS BUILD NEW GENRES AND A NEW FUTURE.
08:00 – 10:00 Offsite; Columbia College So Michigan Ave Chicago IL 60605
Abstract: For decades anthropologists have been experimenting with a variety of blurred genres including ethnographic poetry and fiction, memoirs, performances, or a pastiche of multiple forms. In this special event creative anthropologists showcase new hybrid forms of ethnography and artistry in pursuit of the slippery, ever-changing concept of culture.

Friday, November 22

4-0291 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

4-0305 “WITHOUT MUSIC, THERE IS NO JOY, WITHOUT JOY, THERE IS NO MUSIC,” DJEMBE DRUMMING AND THE GLOBAL IMPACT OF MANDINGUE CULTURE
10:00 – 11:30 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This presentation consists of a demonstration of traditional Mandingue rhythms and their meanings in the context of a West African culture more than 1000 years old. The performance will be interspersed with interactive discussion exploring issues raised by the global impact of the djembe drum over the past fifty years.
Especial presentation at Hilton, Second Floor  Grand Ballroom on stage 10:00 AM-11:30AM

4-0315 THE LEGACY of Anthropology’s ENGAGEMENT WITH POLICY: A HISTORY in PICTURES AND TEXTS
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract Not Provided

4-0320 TRADE IS SUBLIME: A SCENOGRAPHIC PROPOSITION FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH AT THE WTO, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Trade is Sublime is a video installation that ponders the ontology of multilateral trade and the sustainability of the WTO as a trade regime. The installation was developed as a modality to revisit ethnographic research conducted at the WTO between 2008 and 2010, and was displayed at the WTO in Geneva in June, 2013 as a prompt for deepening those insights.
Especial presentation at  Hilton,  Second Floor  Grand Ballroom on stage 12:00PM-1:00PM

4-0325 SITES OF MEDIATION: A VISUAL ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE MARVELOUS REAL EXHIBITION (2013/4) SITIOS DE MEDIACIÓN: ARQUEOLOGÍA VISUAL DE LO REAL MARAVILLOSO (2013/4)
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Sites of Mediation is a multi-sited, bi-lingual (English/Spanish) digital photographic work. Through a visual stratigraphy of image and text, it explores four critical stages or successive, dialectical mediations in the making of an exhibition. It invites publics to extend the critical history of the exhibition by using social media to reflect on and remediate the concept, aesthetics and conceits of the archaeology.

4-0330 TOWARDS A LEGIBLE ANTHROPOLOGY: AIRING OUR DIRTY LAUNDRY
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This installation challenges anthropologists to confront the all-too-common disconnect between our work as writers and the communities we study. Passersby are invited to contribute to the clotheslines, where rags and old T-shirts air our writerly frustrations—our “dirty laundry” in the form of scribbled haikus or minimalist prose.

4-0335 HAWAI‘I BEYOND THE WAVE, HAWAI‘I BEYOND THE POSTCARD
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Visitors are invited to ‘paradise’ through the sensual impression of postcards, sounds of waves, and interview clips from my fieldwork on Kaua‘i. The act of writing postcards to other destinations of this travelling installation (Vienna, Vancouver, and Kaua‘i) creates dialogue between visitors on issues such as paradise, sustainability, and biotechnology.
Especial presentation at Hilton, Second Floor Grand Ballroom on stage 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

4-0340 ENGAGING THE FUTURE THROUGH ENGAGING THE PAST: A MULTI-MEDIA INTERPRETIVE EXPERIENCE ON THE “ROAD OF DEVELOPMENT”
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This multi-media, interactive installation invites participants to move along the development road, stopping to look at, listen to, taste and feel how a diverse group of community members, anthropologists and artists interpret particular events related to development forces: religion, education, healthcare, infrastructure, changing economies, environments, foods and more

4-0345 PRESERVATIONAL DETERMINISM; PRESERVATION of MIND
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Due to pressing issues of abandoned parcels and foreclosure in inner city neighborhoods, Cleveland, Ohio has become part of a conversation on lost space that was once sacred, and now misplaced. This installation aims to physically show the strife this property endured, and the grandeur it once held.

4-0350 DESIGNING CRITICAL CONVERSATION
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract Not Provided

4-0541 ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
12:00 – 06:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

4-1151 RECEPTION-ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
06:00 – 09:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

Saturday, November 23

5-0010 THE ANTHROPOLOGIST IN THE WHITE CITY: TOURING CHICAGO’S 1893 WORLD’S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION *Registration required*
08:00 – 09:00 Hilton, Third Floor, PDR 1
Abstract: The Anthropologist in the White City: Touring Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition offers an in-depth examination of landmarks and landscapes from the most important world’s fair in American history. Led by several experts, participants will become immersed in people, places, and things associated with the birth of American anthropology.

5-0255 ENGAGING the PUBLIC in the ANTHROPOLOGY of EDUCATION: CHICAGO AS INVOCATION AND CONTEXT *Registration required*
08:00 – 01:30 Field Museum
Abstract: This special innovent at the Field Museum considers the study and practice of education in Greater Chicago and around the world. There, educational anthropologists and local educators will address four topics: (1) migration and education; (2) schooling and the economy; (3) schools as community centers, and (4) out-of-school learning. All welcome, but advance registration required.

5-0290 MURALS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN LITTLE VILLAGE, CHICAGO
09:00 – 12:00 Offsite; La Catedral Cafe 2500 S Christiana Ave Chicago IL 60623
Abstract: This installation invites anthropologists into the heart and senses of Little Village to collaborate with well-known Environmental activists and artists in Chicago in the creation of a mural for a traveling exhibit. In the process, participants will co-imagine forms of academic/activist/student collaborations informed and shaped around haptic and sensory engagement.

5-0291 THE ANTHROPOLOGIST IN THE WHITE CITY: TOURING CHICAGO’S 1893 WORLD’S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION *Registration required*
09:00 – 01:00 Offsite
Abstract: The Anthropologist in the White City: Touring Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition offers an in-depth examination of landmarks and landscapes from the most important world’s fair in American history. Led by several experts, participants will become immersed in people, places, and things associated with the birth of American anthropology.

2-0296 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

5-0845 THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED CHICAGO WORKSHOP AND DISCUSSION: PARTICIPATORY THEATER TECHNIQUES FOR FOSTERING EMPOWERED COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO PUBLIC SCHOOL CLOSINGS
01:45 – 03:30 Hilton, Fifth Floor, Conference Room 5E
Abstract Not Provided

5-0985 THEORETICAL UTOPIAS’ ROUNTABLE: THE PROBLEM of EDUCATION in MASS SOCIETIES – WHAT IS to be DONE?
02:30 – 05:30 Offsite; University of Chicago- Contact Organizer (gbakke@wesleyan.edu) for tickets
Abstract: An informal, pie-eating, abstract-thinking, “kitchen-table” event, this year’s topic is the reform of the university system– not gathering to complain! Rather, we aim for open, creative and convivial conversation.Visions for realistic reform are just as welcome as improbable notions for totally systemic overhaul! Pie will be provided.

5-1125 TRACINGS OF TRAUMA: CREATING NEW OBSERVERS
04:00 – 05:45 Hilton, Fifth Floor, Conference Room 5E
Abstract: This is an experiment in engaged anthropology aimed at new forms of public practice. Through involving the audience, as a third voice in the translation of Iraq veterans’ narratives of war, this participatory performance challenges the notion of loss in reinterpreting experience.

Sunday, November 24

6-0276 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

6-0280 INFRASTRUCTURE AND OBSOLESCENCE IN THE URBAN U.S.
10:00 – 01:00 Offsite
Abstract: Off-site tour of infrastructure on Chicago’s mid-South Side, followed by lunch and informal discussion at New Projects space (www.new-projects.org). All sites accessible by CTA transit. Reservations kindly requested by November 1st for details and 2 short discussion texts. Participants can join after this date, but must contact Marina Peterson: petersom@ohio.edu.

Where are you going with your career?

AAA2013Meet professional anthropologists and explore career options at the NAPA/AAA Careers Expo!

NAPA/AAA Careers Expo – Exploring Professional Careers

Friday, November 22 – 11:00AM-4:00PM
Chicago Hilton, Salon C, Exhibit Hall 

Talk with professional anthropologists working in government, for-profit and non-profit organizations.   Archaeologists, medical anthropologists, cultural anthropologists.  Careers in cultural resources, health and human services, high tech, design and promotion, policy making, and more!

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest

Have you added this Installation to your personal scheduler yet? It is one not to miss.

Sponsored by the Society for North American Anthropology

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest: A
Community/Activist Dialogue

In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in
receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the
funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation
brings together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community
activists in conversation. Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday, November 21  4:00-6:00 Jane Addams Hull-House Museum The
University of Illinois at Chicago 800 S. Halsted (M/C 051) Chicago, IL
60607-7017 Organizers: Molly Doane, Ida Susser, Susan Hyatt, SANA

Contact at site:
Molly Doane mdoane@uic.edu

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

The panel includes:
Ida Susser: Introduction

Andy Newman: (Wayne State University): The Crisis in Detroit

Jane Collins (UW-Madison): The Madison uprising

Adrienne Alexander (AFSCME): Chicago perspectives

Jamie Owen Daniel (field service director for the Illinois Federation of
Teachers and Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies): Chicago perspectives

Jim Field (Chicago Coalition for the Homeless)

Christine Noschese (Filmmaker): Clips from Metropolitan Avenue

The event will take place in the Hull House dining hall, where Jane Addams
shared ideas with the leading labor organizers, activists, and
intellectuals of her day. The Hull House Museum features innovative
exhibits that connect the social concerns and activism of today to the
political issues of the early twentieth Century. “Redefining Democracy:
Jane Addams and the Hull House Settlement” and “Unfinished Business: Home
Economics in the 21st Century” will be open 10am-4PM for those interested
in visiting before the event

AAA Annual Meeting Mobile Application: A Brief Survival Guide

Before we begin, a little bit about myself: my name is Andrew Russell, and I began working for the American Anthropological Association in early August.  I came from an anthropological background, and will be the first to admit I had no idea what really went on at the AAA on a daily basis. Now that I’ve stepped “behind the curtain” I am amazed by how efficient and passionate the AAA staff is. Now in my third month, I realized it might be a good opportunity to take a journey with the many members of the AAA, and anthropologists in general.  What does it take to run an academic association? What goes on, on a monthly basis?

As you can imagine, with the November Annual Meeting looming over us, October is a hectic month for the meetings department. Anything that has been waiting to go wrong, has been waiting for October.  But fear not— your trusty meetings department at the AAA is on the case.

October marks the finalization of the program and abstract.  In recent years AAA has sought to bring a more holistically green approach to the meeting, one way is to cut down on the amount of printing we do(It also saves you money). I can assure you, however, we worked tirelessly to make these behemoths the best quality they can be.  That means, putting together a cover design that both represents the wonderful city we are guests of and the meeting itself.  This year we went with the iconic lion statues of Chicago. No offense to Bean lovers, but it’s a good fit, lacking in what I had assumed might come off as regal iconography.

But what is to replace the program?  A mobile application of course, a feature which will hopefully be recurring for meetings to come.  For those of you who have been coming to these events for a while, you may recall (try to forget for us) there was a mobile app a few years ago.  This is certainly not that mobile app, and its features are vastly improved.

The mobile app will be available for Android and iPhone/Pad users, downloadable from their respective stores for free. But what will be included in it, you might wonder. The simple answer is: everything. Everything you might need for the conference at least.

The mobile app is broken up into six sections which I will go over briefly here.

screenshot_1Agenda: This menu will display list of sessions for each Date, as well as a Program sorted alphabetically. Selecting a date will list the sessions for that data. Selecting a session will navigate to the session details screen. The session location will link to a floor plan provided by AAA. After viewing a session, you can add it to your schedule, which will store it on the mobile app. And of course, you can share session information amongst anyone else who has the mobile app— sending a message to their registered email.
Exhibitors: while this might not affect many folks, it’s important to note that a huge reason the AAA is still able to develop these meetings is because of support from exhibitors.  They often come to the Annual Meeting to show off the latest in technological advances and ideas.  The exhibitor section of the mobile app will provide you with names, dates, and map layouts of where to find exhibitors.

Attendees: This will display a list of attendees. This list will display attendee name (first, last) and company name, attendee name sorted alphabetically on last name.  Sorry— you can’t stalk your professor, attendees’ email address and phone number are not displayed until the attendee has turned on display of email address and/or phone number under his/her privacy settings. A search will be available on the attendee list to search for attendees within name and company. That being said, the mobile app will act as a messaging device within the meeting. You’ll be able to send a message via the attendee detail screen.  You can also request an appointment through a similar manner.
Information: Here is where you’ll find the FAQ for the meeting.  Ideally, this will answer every question you could possibly want to know about the annual meeting. The questions were collected from our staff, so I’m sure we’ve missed a few things.  During the meeting, we’ll provide you with an email address to send further questions— who knows, your question might be confusing enough that we put it up on the FAQ.  FAQs thus far include, getting to the meeting, workshops, installments, student Saturday, and an in-depth explanation of the mobile app itself (hey you never know).

Announcements: Announcements will be a quick and easy way for the AAA to get information out to you.  This could range from a fire alert to free pizza— so make sure not to ignore these notifications.

screenshot_2My Meetings: The nexus of everything to mobile app has to offer.  Here you can view appointments and sessions added to your schedule and remove items from said schedule; this included free form additions.  Your schedule will also be updated periodically based on information you have provided the AAA. This section will also include appointments, where you can view appointment requests and approve or deny requests and also view status of your own requests.  For those of you who might be a little more disorganized (or who just like to be really on top of things) we also provide you with a To Do List. Here you can view the exhibitors added to your To Do List and remove items from the To Do list. As with the appointments, this can be free form items.  My Meetings will also include the messaging system used to contact anyone else with the mobile app. Last but not least, you will also have access to
“My Profile.” Where you can control which email notifications you receives (appointments, messages, announcements). Ability to view email address and phone number is turned OFF by default.

Hope this clears things up. The mobile app is currently available for android and iPhone users and can be picked up at the iTunes store here: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=692800377&mt=8

Of course, this is really our first go at the mobile app experience, and it’s an evolving process– so feel free to suggest corrections by sending them to aaameetings@aaanet.org.

The Annual Meeting is only a few weeks away, come prepared!

Susan Hyatt: An Anthropologist Back to School

Today’s guest blog post is written by Dr. Susan B. Hyatt.  Dr. Hyatt is currently an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). During the 1980s, she spent 8 years working as a community organizer in South Chicago, which is where she first developed her interest in  community collaborative projects. Dr. Hyatt has volunteered to lead a program in the Anthropologists Back to School initiative. Her program will take place at The Field Museum. This new initiative seeks volunteers to lead and assist programs at various host sites throughout Chicago on Wednesday, November 20 from 9am to12pm. Share your passion of anthropology while giving back to this year’s host city – Chicago. Learn more about how you can participate in Anthropologists Back to School and register today!

Photo courtesy IUPUI

Photo courtesy IUPUI

I am looking forward to participating in the Anthropologists Back to School initiative at the Field Museum in Chicago on November 19th.  My workshop will be based on a collaborative ethnographic project I carried out in Indianapolis, which brought together university students, a synagogue, a community center and a Black Baptist Church in an endeavor we called, “The Neighborhood of Saturdays.”

In 2010, Anthropology students from my institution, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) began conducting oral history interviews with former residents of what had once been one of the most multi-ethnic neighborhoods in Indianapolis—the near Southside.  We focused on two groups who had occupied that space between 1920-1960— the children of Jewish immigrants whose families hailed from cities formerly located in the Ottoman Empire in the early years of the 20th century, and African Americans whose families arrived from the south during the Great Migration.  During the 1950s, many of the Jewish families began moving to the more affluent northside neighborhoods where many of the Jewish communal institutions had already relocated.  Ten years later, the remaining African American community was displaced by the construction of an interstate highway that bisected the old neighborhood, destroying both residential properties and a once-vibrant commercial strip.

Photos courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Photos courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Former African-American and Jewish neighbors largely lost contact with one another after the highway came through.  Once a year, however, the African-American former southsiders continued to gather in a small park in the old neighborhood for a reunion picnic, held on the first Saturday in August.  I learned about the reunion picnics and began attending them in 2008 with the idea that students enrolled in my Ethnographic Methods class would collect life histories about the old Southside and about the reunions, which were then in their 35th year. I had assumed that the neighborhood had long been primarily African-American, however in my interviews at that first picnic, several folks shared with me their recollections of how special they felt it had been to grow up in a multi-ethnic neighborhood, especially in that earlier historical era, and they reminisced in particular about their former Jewish neighbors and about the many Jewish-owned businesses that had once thronged the main thoroughfare, Meridian St.

Through a chance encounter, I met later met a member of one of those Southside Jewish families and she put me in touch with others.  Both communities were excited and enthusiastic about coming back together to work with the students toward the goal of writing a book about their community.  We changed the name of the project from “First Saturday in August” to “The Neighborhood of Saturdays,” which incorporated references to both the picnic and to the Jewish observance of the Sabbath on Saturdays.

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Over a two-year period, Jewish and African-American Southsiders gathered regularly with the students to record their life stories and to talk about the on-going research and plan the book.  In addition to carrying out the oral history interviews, students also engaged in archival research about the neighborhood and they organized several events we called “scan-a-thons.”  The scan-a-thons were held at a community center, at the synagogue and at the Black church, where we invited people to bring old photographs, church bulletins, newspaper articles and other memorabilia about the neighborhood which we scanned using laptops and portable scanners.  All of that material was organized and catalogued by our university library’s Digital Scholarship team and it is now available on a library web site, along with some of the publicity that the project garnered, including an article from the New York Times and a recent story on our local NPR affiliate.

Last February, we self-published the book, The Neighborhood of Saturdays: Memories of a Multi-Ethnic Neighborhood on Indianapolis’ Southside.  Elders who were involved in the project have continued to organize events around the city to share their memories of growing up together and to reflect on their experiences reuniting after more than 50 years to work on the book.

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

The students and I were surprised to learn that during an era when Jim Crow was a de facto aspect of life in Indianapolis, in the “neighborhood of Saturdays,” people had once come together across racial and religious boundaries to forge friendships that were revived by our research project. For my Back to School workshop, I plan to share some stories about this project and to perhaps show the students some short videos of our elders talking about the old neighborhood.  I hope to help them think about how urban neighborhoods change through time, and to understand how we can use strategies like mapping, interviewing and scanning old photographs to discover stories that might surprise us today. Like Sabiyha Prince, I also hope that some of them will think about working on their own neighborhood history projects, and about perhaps organizing their own story-telling sessions and even scan-a-thons with their family elders and neighbors.   If nothing else, hopefully they will learn that the communities where they live now and that they take for granted in their current incarnations may once have looked very different, and that they can use some of the strategies we used to uncover their own neighborhood’s “hidden history.”

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