• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 20,601 other followers

2015 Photo Contest Starts!

The AAA Photo Contest returns again this year, and submission are open to all active AAA members, submit here!

By the End of a Day

“By the End of a Day” from Ming Xue, photo selected for May 2015.

If you could define your work in a single picture, what would it look like?

AAA members work all around the world, in the most diverse cultures imaginable, and we want to showcase them.  If you attended the annual meeting last year in Chicago, you may have noticed a calendar waiting in your complimentary bag with some truly gorgeous pictures—drawing not just from cultural anthropology, but also archaeology, linguistic, biological and political fields.

We’d like to do it again this year, drawing from a new batch of photographs provided by you, our membership.  Photographs can be anything you believe relates to your work; the photographs may not portray any nudity or illicit activity.

Contestants may submit their work in one of three categories: people, places, practice.  Along with your photograph, include a caption for your work, and a brief autobiographical statement of no more than 150 words.  Your biography will not affect your likelihood of being featured in the calendar—we just like to learn a little bit more about our active members. Photographs must be your own, and you must be a current member of the AAA.  Winning photos in the calendar will be printed at 11×8, so be sure the resolution is good enough to print at those dimensions.

You may begin submitting your photographs today. You are more than welcome to submit up to 3 photographs, but only one will potentially be featured in the calendar. The deadline for entries will be August 6th.  After we’ve processed the photos, we’ll put all qualified entries to the membership for a vote in the late summer. The votes will be tallied, and the top 12 photos, from 12 different members, will be featured in the 2016 AAA calendar, which will be distributed at this year’s annual meeting in Denver, CO.  Of course, all winners will also be showcased on our website.

Questions? Want a 2015 Calendar?

Contact Andrew Russell at photos@aaanet.org

Webinar Wednesday with Larissa Sandy: Sex Work in Cambodia

Hello anthropology enthusiasts!  Our next webinar, with Larissa Sandy, will be the last scheduled before we take a break for the summer.  In it we’ll be exploring the struggles and livelihood of sex work in Cambodia. Before we get into Larissa’s incredible work, I’d like to take a moment to thank you all for an amazing first year of webinars.  What started out as a side project– and a chance for me to talk with some of my anthropology heroes– has evolved into a vibrant experience, and it always makes me smile to see folks tuning in to our twice a month journey into anthropology. Life can be hectic, and I appreciate that you all chose to spend your time with us. We have a great schedule for the fall leading up to the Annual Meeting in Denver this year, but for now let’s dive into Larissa’s webinar:

lsandyIt is very difficult for many people to understand sex work in Cambodia in terms other than trafficking, and so this webinar attempts to challenge and transform conventional thought and theory about sex work in non-Western modern settings like Cambodia.

In the webinar, I explore women’s pathways into sex work and highlight how this often begins with a series of constraints and choices that cannot be disconnected and which renders their identification as victims of trafficking or free agents highly problematic. The webinar shifts the focus of debate from very simplistic dichotomies by concentrating on descriptions of women’s lives rather than beginning with a priori assumptions (e.g. sex workers as victims enslaved in prostitution). I consider some of the difficulties surrounding the intersection of structural factors with subjective choices in sex workers’ everyday lives and analyse how Cambodia’s transitional economy and development plans shape sex working women’s trajectories into and experiences of sex work, and debt bondage in particular.

By exploring sex work through an anthropological lens, the webinar examines women’s involvement in the sector as part of the moral and political economies of sex work. It also discusses how sex work can be understood as a rational economic choice and a vehicle through which important social and cultural obligations fulfilled as well as reflecting on the pressing need to critically re-think the trafficking/sex slavery label.

Bio: Larissa Sandy is an anthropologist at RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia) where she lectures in the Criminology program. Her research examines sex work and women’s agency; contract labour, debt bondage and other forms of unfree labour in sex work; sex worker activism; and the global politics of sex work regulation. Before joining RMIT University, Larissa was a Vice Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in Criminology at Flinders University, where her research explored the effects of human trafficking laws and interventions for male and female sex workers in Cambodia. She is author of Women and Sex Work in Cambodia: Blood, Sweat and Tears (Routledge).

Bring your questions and curiosity, and don’t forget to register beforehand! The webinar begins 2 PM Eastern Time on May 20th, looking forward to seeing you there!

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs

Hope you all enjoyed your webinar hiatus (and Call for Papers period) because we’ve got two more amazing webinars coming your way before we break for the summer! The first, which will occur on May 6th, is hosted by Dr. Kenda R. Stewart, Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger, and Dr. David A. Katz. The second will be hosted by Dr. Larissa Sandy and will go live May 20th and will be focusing on Sex Work in Cambodia.  Both registrations are active and the password will be anthro when it’s time to join.  Larissa deserves her own blog post, so check back for that later next week.  For now, here’s a little preview of what’s coming your way May 6th:

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Kenda R. Stewart, PhD, David A. Katz, MD, MSc, and Heather Schacht Reisinger, PhD

In recent years the number of anthropologists employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs has exploded. In October 2013, Dr. David Atkins, the Director of VA’s Health Services Research & Development affirmed anthropologists’ contribution to health services research teams because of their expertise in understanding how culture can facilitate or impede efforts to improve health care. Using a mixed-methods smoking cessation study as an example, this webinar will explore the incorporation of anthropological methods and insights into the institutional and research structure of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Anthropologist Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger will provide an historical overview of the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE)’s Qualitative Core, housed at the Iowa City VA. Dr. Kenda Stewart, also an anthropologist, will discuss her role in conducting qualitative research on a smoking cessation intervention in collaboration with quantitative researcher, Dr. David Katz, MD, who will share his experience working with anthropologists and the advantages and challenges of incorporating anthropological methods into health services research.

Presenter bios:

Dr. Kenda R. Stewart is an anthropologist and qualitative analyst for the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE), the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center-Central Region, and the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) Demonstration Lab located in Iowa City, IA. Currently, she is involved in multiple VA studies on topics including evaluating telehealth modalities for rural Veterans with HIV, chronic pain management, smoking cessation, primary care teams, Veteran outreach, and infertility in Veterans.

Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger is an anthropologist and Investigator at CADRE and an Assistant Professor in the General Internal Medicine Division in the Department of Internal Medicine at University of Iowa. Currently, she is the Principle Investigator on two VA HSR&D-funded projects and has led qualitative components on several multi-site VA and non-VA studies on topics including substance abuse treatment, hypertension, MI and ACS, ICU telemedicine, and infection control.

Dr. David A. Katz is a Core Investigator in (CADRE) Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City.  He has expertise in conducting practice-based intervention research, and has an ongoing interest in the dynamics of changing clinician behavior.  He has collaborated closely with qualitative investigators in VA and NIH-funded implementation trials of smoking cessation guidelines in inpatient and outpatient practice settings.  Dr. Katz co-directs the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team Demonstration Laboratory, which is conducting an ongoing assessment of the patient-centered medical home initiative within the Veterans Health Administration.

As per usual, the webinar will begin at 2 PM Eastern Time. Please register here beforehand and don’t forget the password is ‘anthro’

Bring your questions and curiosity this is going to be a great one!

Applied Anthropologist Spotlight – Elizabeth Briody at Cultural Keys LLC

Cultural Keys LLCCultural Keys LLC is a consultancy that I founded in 2009 to help firms and nonprofits understand and solve cultural-change and consumer issues.  We specialize in three work streams:  improving organizational culture, increasing partnership effectiveness, and understanding and reaching customers.

Cultural Keys uses an anthropological approach and a combination of techniques (e.g., observation, individual and group interviews, content analysis).  Key questions guiding our approach include:
•What makes a particular organization’s culture work well and what does not?
•What changes are necessary to improve overall performance?
•How might an organization’s culture transition to some new configuration so that it can be effective and successful in the future?

We typically work with members of the client organization to gather and validate data, and to produce actionable recommendations, implementation plans, and cultural-change tools.

Cultural Keys has helped clients in a variety of industries including medical, consumer-products, insurance, long-term-care, and food manufacturing.  We design projects around the issues that clients want to tackle.  Here are a few examples:

Improving patient hospital experiences:  A large southern U.S. hospital wanted to become more “patient-centric.”  I led a team of seven in conducting interviews and observations with hospital personnel and found that developing rapport with patients was not consistently a part of patient care.  Moreover, the hospital’s functional “silos” were barriers to collaboration and innovation.  Our team worked with hospital leaders to document and learn from two successful hospital innovations.  We developed and tested recommendations both from these initiatives, and from other lower-performing patient-care activities.  Finally, we produced 16 tools to help leaders problem solve effectively across silos, prioritize the patient experience, and reduce patient wait time.

Understanding and communicating an organization’s value:  The Board of Trustees of an assisted living and nursing care community wanted to be able to articulate its culture to prospective residents and their families.  Cultural Keys worked with anthropologist Sherri Briller (Purdue) to conduct interviews with residents, family members, staff, and volunteers.  The project resulted in rave reviews of the “Welcome Home” care philosophy, now a core part of marketing efforts.

Other Cultural Keys’ projects also pertain to organizational-culture change.  I worked with Pacific Ethnography headed by Ken Erickson (U of South Carolina) to interview customers, sales clerks, and employees of an intimate apparel firm.  Our recommendations focused on how to meet customer needs and increase sales by changing the mindset and structure of the firm.  Currently, I am working with a global food manufacturer to ease the transition for employees who were part of a recent acquisition.

I am fortunate to have some time to write up selected aspects of these consulting projects.  Some recent articles have appeared in the Journal of Business Anthropology as well as the International Journal of Business Anthropology.  Other examples appear in Transforming Culture: Creating and Sustaining Effective Organizations with Bob Trotter and Tracy Meerwarth (Palgrave, 2014), and The Cultural Dimension of Global Business with Gary Ferraro (7th ed., Pearson, 2013).

Elizabeth BriodyElizabeth K. Briody, Ph.D. is Founder and Principal of Cultural Keys LLC, a firm that helps companies and nonprofits understand and address organizational and cultural-change issues.  Briody has helped clients in many industries, including those at General Motors where she worked for 24 years.  She is currently a member of the AAA Executive Board and just completed her service as Chair of the AAA Working Group on Mentoring.

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

karen

Dr. Karen Kelsky is the founder and principal of The Professor Is In, a blog and business dedicated to helping Ph.D.s turn their advanced degrees into jobs.  A former R1 tenured professor in Anthropology, and department head in the Humanities, Dr. Karen demystifies the unspoken rules that govern university hiring. In addition to blogging on every aspect of the job market, from building a competitive record and planning a publishing trajectory, to writing job applications, interviewing, and negotiating an offer, Dr. Karen works directly with clients on their individual job searches.  She also has a book in press with Random House, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job.   It comes out August 4, 2015.

In this webinar, I walk you through the basic expectations and potential pitfalls of the dreaded Campus Visit (sometimes called a Fly-Out) in Anthropology.There will be time for Q and A at the end, so bring questions!

We will examine:

 -The basic organization of a campus visit  -The job talk and Q and A
 -The single biggest pitfall for candidates  -The teaching demo
 -The initial arrangements and scheduling  -Handling meals gracefully
 -Preparing for the visit  -What to wear, especially in cold weather
– Meetings throughout the day

Check out the webinar here!

Call for Papers – Special Issue: Campus Sustainability & Social Sciences

Today’s guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education – Universities and colleges have been among the leading places where sustainability is promoted on campus and beyond. The social sciences can offer a variety of valuable insights into how to enhance a broad range of these efforts at higher education institutions: from supporting recycling, waste reduction, water and energy conservation, renewable energy and alternative transportation use, sustainable food procurement, and green building construction to fostering a sustainability culture. This special issue aims to present contemporary, state-of-the-art applications of how social science theories, models, and findings can help overcome campus sustainability challenges – and – to illustrate the diversity of social science campus sustainability research conducted across the world.
Papers are sought from a range of social sciences including but not limited to anthropology, communication, economics, education, geography, psychology, political science, and sociology. Interdisciplinary social science contributions are welcome as well. Manuscripts may consist of:

  • Research syntheses of a particular campus sustainability challenge from the perspective of single or multiple social science disciplines.
  • Conceptual and theoretical frameworks illustrating how individual or multiple social science disciplines can contribute to enhancing campus sustainability.
  • Empirical campus sustainability research based on quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods, addressing and illustrating the benefits of drawing on the social sciences.
  • Evaluations of campus sustainability programs based on social science research.
  • Case studies of campus sustainability programs examined through the lens of a single or multiple social science disciplines.

Information and Instructions for submissions: Prospective authors should submit an abstract of around 500 words, outlining the proposed manuscript, directly to the guest editor (zintmich@umich.edu) by 15th November 2014.

 

New Resource: Course Conversations Assignment for all Faculty

This guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

Utilize this teaching activity that engages students and is easily integrated as an assignment into a wide variety of courses. It emphasizes civil discourse skills across political and cultural perspectives and focuses on the topic of sustainable energy (i.e. energy efficiency and renewable energies). The Course Conversations activity is applicable to all academic disciplines, is geared for both undergraduate and graduate students, and can be assigned in both large and small classes. Students act as co-hosts to the conversation. Conversations begin by understanding ground rules for civil discourse before the actual topic is discussed. Conversations can result in civic engagement opportunities where students communicate to decision makers their findings/conclusions regarding the benefits/potentials of energy efficiency and renewable energies. Course Conversations includes all materials needed to utilize this assignment in your course and provides an easy and automated set-up for grading and assessment. It has been featured at Harvard as a quality learning experience.

For Course Conversations teaching tools and resources see the following link: http://www.livingroomconversations.org/campus-conversations/

For more information, contact Debra Rowe at dgrowe@oaklandcc.edu or campusenergyconversations@gmail.com

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,601 other followers