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The 2014 AAA Photo Contest

Announcing the 2014 AAA Photo Contest

Submit Your Photos through July 6th*

 

If you could define your work in a single picture, what would it look like?

 

AAA members work all around the world, in the most diverse cultures imaginable, and we want to showcase them.  If you attended the annual meeting last year in Chicago, you may have noticed a calendar waiting in your complimentary bag with some truly gorgeous pictures—drawing not just from cultural anthropology, but also archaeology, linguistic, biological and political fields.

 

We’d like to do it again this year, drawing from a new batch of photographs provided by you, our membership.  Photographs can be anything you believe relates to your work; the photographs may not portray any nudity or illicit activity.

 

Contestants may submit their work in one of three categories: people, places, practice.  Along with your photograph, include a caption for your work, and a brief autobiographical statement of no more than 150 words.  Your biography will not affect your likelihood of being featured in the calendar—we just like to learn a little bit more about our active members. Photographs must be your own, and you must be a current member of the AAA.  Winning photos in the calendar will be printed at 11×8, so be sure the resolution is good enough to print at those dimensions.  Submit your photos to http://projects.aaanet.org/photo_contest/

 

You may begin submitting your photographs today. You are more than welcome to submit up to 3 photographs, but only one will potentially be featured in the calendar. The deadline for entries will be June 30.  After we’ve processed the photos, we’ll put all qualified entries to the membership for a vote in the late summer. The votes will be tallied, and the top 12 photos, from 12 different members, will be featured in the 2015 AAA calendar, which will be distributed at this year’s annual meeting in Washington DC.  Of course, all winners will also be showcased on our website.

 

Questions? Contact Andrew Russell at photos@aaanet.org .*

*Information updated from the AN article: June 30th became July 6th to account for a longer submission phase, and photos@aaanet.org which will now field all questions, while http://projects.aaanet.org/photo_contest/ will field submissions.

Today! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

If you missed today’s webinar, stream it now: http://bit.ly/1jvlnDK

New Webinar! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

Statement on Supreme Court Case Schuette v Bamn

April 22, 2014 -The Supreme Court upheld a Michigan voter initiative that banned racial preferences in admissions to the state’s public universities in the case Schuette v. Bamn. The American Anthropological Association filed an amicus curiae (“friend of the court”) brief in this case, supporting the universities’ use of race in admissions. A considerable body of research provides convincing evidence that student body diversity promotes learning outcomes, and better prepares students for an increasingly diverse workforce and society.

AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow said “today’s Supreme Court decision suggests a world view that race has no place in such important life altering events as university admissions choices.” He argues on the contrary, “this decision flies in the face of social science research that shows how race matters.”

The American Anthropological Association’s public education project, RACE: Are We So Different? helps to promote a broad understanding of race and human variation, including the importance of diversity. The RACE Project has produced to date an award-winning public education program entitled RACE Are We So Different? The program includes a traveling museum exhibit, an interactive website, and educational materials.

National Geographic Channel International Cancels “Nazi War Diggers”

To AAA members:
This letter was sent on March 31st, 2014, to the National Geographic Society, National Geographic Channels and National Geographic Channel International to protest a program aired in Europe (with a trailer briefly available on YouTube), by the presidents of six anthropological and archeological associations based in the United States and Europe, including the AAA. The effort was spearheaded by Jeff Altschul, President of the Society for American Archeology. The content of the letter provides, I think, sufficient information for you to understand why this program is of concern to all anthropologists. Shortly before the letter was sent, Dr. Altschul received the following statement from John Francis, Vice-President of National Geographic:

“National Geographic Channels International, in consultation with colleagues at the National Geographic Society, announced today that it will pull the series Nazi War Diggers from its schedule indefinitely while questions raised in recent days about allegations about the program can be properly reviewed. While we support the goal of the series, which is to tell the stories of long lost and forgotten soldiers, those left behind and still unaccounted for, and illuminate history working in concert with local governments and authorities, we also take seriously the questions that have been asked. National Geographic Channels is committed to engaging viewers in the exploration of the world and all of us associated with National Geographic are committed to doing our work with the highest standards. We know the same holds true for our producing partners, including our partners on this series.”

We look forward to their response to our letter, and will indicate to them our willingness to work with them to ensure their programming meets the highest professional standards.

Best,

Monica Heller
President, American Anthropological Association

 

AAA President-elect Distinguishably Honored By Students

AWaterstonPhoto02.2014Named the 2014 Distinguished Faculty by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Alumni Association, Dr. Alisse Waterston will be honored during the annual Alumni Reunion in April. Dr. Waterston, a professor in the Department of Anthropology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice since 2003, is a cultural anthropologist who studies the human consequences of structural and systematic violence and inequality. She is the American Anthropological Association’s President-elect and Editor of the Association’s newest digital publication, Open Anthropology. Dr. Waterston is a Soros International Scholar affiliated with the Gender Studies Department, Tbilisi State University, Republic of Georgia. And she is the author of My Father’s Wars: Migration, Memory and the Violence of a Century, an intimate ethnography in the Routledge Series of Innovative Ethnographies.

Take a #StandForScience

The FIRST Act, introduced on Monday by Representative Larry Buschon (R-IN), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Research of the larger House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, fails to properly fund social science work at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and widens the nation’s innovation deficit. The FIRST Act would impede the mission of NSF and the nation’s research portfolio. Among other items, the bill:

1. Completely fails to meet the standards for science research and innovation that were set in the former version of the authorizing legislation, commonly referred to as the COMPETES Act;

2. Sets funding targets for for NSF and NIST that are not adequate to fund basic research; and

3. Includes a funding cut for the the Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE), the division of the NSF that is primarily responsible for funding anthropological research.

Help AAA #StandForScience by contacting your congressional representative to request full restoration of NSF’s authorized levels or vote NO to the FIRST Act (#VoteNoHR4186). Please use the Twitter hastags to voice your opinion as well.

To read a press release issued by the American Association Universities, click here. For a copy of the FIRST Act, click here.

If you would like more information about contacting your Member of Congress, or about the FIRST Act, please contact Damon Dozier, AAA Director of Public Affairs at ddozier@aaanet.org.

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