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AAA Student Summer Internship – Applications due 3/15

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to offer two internship opportunities funded by member donations.

Internships are six weeks in length from June 30 through August 8, 2014.  Internships are unpaid however; interns will be provided housing and a meal/travel stipend.

Interns will spend approximately 40 percent of their time working onsite at the AAA offices in Arlington, Virginia, and the other 60 percent of their time working on-site at one of three locations described below.

Eligibility:

  • Undergraduate students in their junior or senior year
  • First Year Graduate students (completing the first year of graduate work by June 2013)

Visit the AAA Summer Internship Program webpage for the application. Application deadline is March 15, 2014.

Click here to support this Internship Program through a financial contribution.

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Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Save the date for Webinar Wednesdays!

In 2014, the American Anthropological Association hosts a monthly webinar series on the third Wednesday of the month on a variety of topics to engage anthropologists.

Mark-Aldenderfer_2On March 19, 2014 at 2pm ET, AAA will host a webinar event with Dr. Mark Aldenderfer on the topic of The Bar is Very High:Academic Dossier Evaluation and What to Expect. The webinar will be of particular interest to anthropology graduate students, recent PhDs, as well as AAA Section Leadership and volunteers. The program will cover topics such as:

  • Crafting tenure dossiers and the importance of publishing records (including online publishing)
  • The realities of what PhDs can expect during the tenure evaluation process and being prepared
  • Department culture and the expectations of deans, chairs, admins and colleagues

Mark S. Aldenderfer is an American anthropologist and archaeologist. He is the Dean of the School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts at the University of California, Merced. He has served as Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, and the University of California, Santa Barbara.  Aldenderfer received his Ph.D. from Penn State University in 1977. He is known in particular for his comparative research into high-altitude adaptation and for contributions to quantitative methods in archaeology. He has also served as editor of several journals in anthropology and archaeology.

This webinar is free but registration is required.

Take a #StandForScience

The FIRST Act, introduced on Monday by Representative Larry Buschon (R-IN), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Research of the larger House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, fails to properly fund social science work at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and widens the nation’s innovation deficit. The FIRST Act would impede the mission of NSF and the nation’s research portfolio. Among other items, the bill:

1. Completely fails to meet the standards for science research and innovation that were set in the former version of the authorizing legislation, commonly referred to as the COMPETES Act;

2. Sets funding targets for for NSF and NIST that are not adequate to fund basic research; and

3. Includes a funding cut for the the Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE), the division of the NSF that is primarily responsible for funding anthropological research.

Help AAA #StandForScience by contacting your congressional representative to request full restoration of NSF’s authorized levels or vote NO to the FIRST Act (#VoteNoHR4186). Please use the Twitter hastags to voice your opinion as well.

To read a press release issued by the American Association Universities, click here. For a copy of the FIRST Act, click here.

If you would like more information about contacting your Member of Congress, or about the FIRST Act, please contact Damon Dozier, AAA Director of Public Affairs at ddozier@aaanet.org.

2014 Leadership Fellows Program

AAA is accepting applications to the 2014 Leadership Fellows Program. This program provides a unique opportunity for anthropologists early in their careers to learn about leadership opportunities within the association.  Each year a group of three to five fellows is paired with a mentor chosen from among AAA leadership.  Mentors are available to fellows throughout the year to answer questions related to AAA.  Fellows shadow their mentors at the AAA Annual Meeting in meetings of the Executive Board, Association Committees, and Section Committees. In addition, fellows are invited to attend the AAA Donors Reception and a Leadership Fellows Social bringing together past and present cohorts of fellows.

Past Fellows have told us that their experience in the program “demystified the decision-making processes,” “fostered a strong network for me of young anthropologists,” and “gave me a better sense as to how to manage the AAA meetings.” Many go on to assume leadership roles in sections and committees after their term as a Fellow. According to Rebecca Galemba (U Denver), 2012 Leadership Fellow, had she not participated in the Leadership Fellows Program, she might not have had the courage to apply for undesignated seat on the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology. Heide Castañeda (U South Florida), 2011 Leadership Fellow, credits the Leadership Fellows Program with helping her achieve tenure by bringing visibility to her interest in service and leadership within the larger discipline of anthropology.

Learn more about the benefits of the Leadership Fellows Program and submit your application online. Applications must be submitted by March 15.

All questions should be directed to Courtney Dowdall (cdowdall@aaanet.org).

AAA Welcomes New Project Manager for the New Public Education Initiative on Migration and Displacement

arvenita.washington_cherryArvenita Washington Cherry joined the AAA staff in February 2014 as project manager for the new public education initiative on Migration and Displacement. Arvenita is a socio-cultural and educational anthropologist. She is also adjunct faculty at University of Maryland University College and principal of Phoenix Cultural Resources, LLC, where she has had substantial experience in philanthropy and with non-profit organizations. She earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology with a concentration in Race, Gender, and Social Justice and a M.A. in Public Anthropology from American University. Arvenita received a Master in Teaching Middle/Secondary Biology and a B.S. in Biology from Hampton University, as well as a graduate certificate in Nonprofit Studies from Johns Hopkins University. Arvenita’s primary research focuses on the African Diaspora in Prince George’s County, Maryland with emphasis on social constructions of race and ethnicity among diverse African Americans and Afro Latinas/os in predominately Black suburban spaces and in public education. She is particularly interested in Diaspora as an important aspect of migration and as a tool for teaching and community building.

Her work with museums has included being Scholar-in-Residence and History Keepers Program Coordinator at the Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center. She also completed a competitive two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in the Department of Africana Studies and Language, Literacy and Culture program.

Arvenita will draw upon her project management experience and formal training in anthropology to oversee the development and implementation of this initiative that will encompass a traveling museum exhibit, web site, curriculum guides, interactive multi-media applications, and other suitable public education activities. She will also contribute to fund-raising efforts, manage publicity and promotional activities, and establish partnerships with appropriate organizations. Additionally, Arvenita will make public presentations about the initiative and its outcomes, and coordinate the activities of the AAA Steering Group that provides technical and policy guidance concerning the initiative.

Arvenita lives in Maryland with her husband Richard, their son Bryce, and their dog Bruno (their other son) and enjoys traveling, genealogy research, and exercising.

Open Anthropology – The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care: Anthropological Views

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Open Anthropology, a digital-only, public publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its third issue. In this edition, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care: Anthropological Views, editor Alisse Waterston (John Jay College, CUNY) curates eleven articles and three book reviews of anthropological works that encompass today’s health care debate, access to insurance and quality health care, social inequity, and historical perspectives on medicinal practices and well-being across cultures.

In her prefatory remarks, Waterston reflects on the national health care conversation, noting that “(t)he whole mess – the fights, the threats, the web crashes – was successful in capturing the public’s attention,” and is left to wonder if the cacophony served to distract the public from the key issues around access to health care. Editor Waterston offers a selection of anthropology articles that “help defamiliarize the ‘normal,’ that make strange the familiar, a process that can lead to new insights, understandings, and positions.”

At a time when the issues of health care and insurance are on the national agenda, Open Anthropology provides cross-cultural information and historical perspective to inform national and global health care policy and practice. Anthropologists recognize that when it comes to health care, “We are all in the same frail boat,” as Gerald D. Berreman notes in his article featured here. Others document obstacles to health and well-being as well as success stories in the effort to provide quality health care to all.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and will be freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics of interest to the general public, and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

Open Anthropology is available at http://www.aaaopenanthro.org

Changes to the AAA Publishing Program

Have you heard about the upcoming changes to the AAA Publishing Program? Below is an excerpt from newest issue of Anthropology News, featuring a piece by AAA Director of Publishing, Oona Schmid.

In November 2013, the AAA Executive Board (EB) adopted a series of recommendations from the Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing (CFPEP) that embrace new ways of producing and distributing its journals and endeavor to get the association’s publishing program on sustainable footing. These changes also ensure the association will have resources for new innovation (see “Mind the App Gap”). Specifically, the EB moved that member print copies (for all the titles covered in the Wiley-Blackwell service level agreement) will become fully digital starting in 2016. Individual members will be able to buy at cost a print subscription to any journal published by sections that member has joined. The EB authorized creation of a publishing oversight working group within CFPEP, a working group that will have three section representatives. And finally, the EB required that sections who would like to be included in any 2016 Request for Proposals to publishers would need to submit five-year plans (covering 2016–20), which will be reviewed by a Publishing Oversight Working Group of CFPEP. Even though the publishing contract does not expire until the end of 2017, we need to plan to either renew or locate a new partner in 2016.

Much like fieldwork, the publishing world is a work in progress. These changes do not represent a break with the past, rather, they show the ongoing advancement of the publishing program, a necessary progression that will improve the accessibility and visibility of our journals in response to changes in the publishing environment faced by newspapers, university presses, and other scholarly societies.

The evolution of the AAA publishing program can be divided schematically into three stages.pub model

Read the entire article in Anthropology News. Have questions? Check up the recently updated Publishing FAQs.

AAA Office Closed

The AAA office is closed today due to the snowstorm.

As Anthropology Doctorates Increase in Number & Diversity, So Do Financial & Social Support Needs

The AAA receives daily requests from researchers, administrators, faculty, and students for information such as:

  •  Number of degrees granted in a given year
  • Average length of time to complete a degree in anthropology
  • Degrees granted by gender and/or minority status
  • Post-graduation employment rates

To address these inquiries we often rely on our membership database, AnthroGuide, and findings from special purpose surveys. In addition, in January 2014, the NSF released tables and an interactive report on findings from the 2012 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). First conducted in 1957-1958, the 2012 SED reports on “all individuals who received a research doctorate from a U.S. academic institution in the 12-month period from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012,” producing annual statistics on graduate demographics, time to degree, funding source, field of study, and post-graduate commitments. For the most recent iteration, the total eligible population was 51,008 graduates with a doctorate degree. The survey had a response rate of 92% of doctorate recipients.

In this first of two reports, we highlight key findings in the composition of graduates in anthropology and the social sciences. The Graduates 2012 Report: As Anthropology Doctorates Increase in Number and Diversity, So Do Financial and Social Support Needs for Graduates summarizes growth patterns among PhDs, and changes in anthropology’s graduate student body composition, based on data from the NSF SED and contextualized with recent reports on the costs and benefits of graduate-level education. The NSF SED data indicate that post-secondary education enrollments continue to rise as graduate-level degrees become requisite for an increasing range of careers. While a greater portion of college-aged students are attending graduate school, they are enrolling disproportionately in career-oriented fields. More students from racialized minority groups are pursuing doctorate degrees, albeit with less social and financial resources at hand than their white counterparts. And the costs versus gains in pursuing a graduate degree may be differentially calculated among members of racial and ethnic categories. The findings reported in the SED, combined with growing reports of PhD debt suggest that the demographic profile of students and role of higher education are evolving.

The second, forthcoming report will discuss post-graduation employment trends.

As we continue to strengthen our institutional research capacity, we will be updating, re-organizing, and building on the reports and data sources currently available on our Resources for Researchers webpages. By constructing an easily-navigated, comprehensive repository for assessing trends in education, academic programs, membership, and employment, we hope to help our members and other interested parties obtain the information and statistics necessary to monitor trends, lobby for resources, and address changing needs in our field. We look forward to any feedback or additional inquiries you would like to contribute to this effort.

For more information on the Graduates 2012 Report, please contact Courtney Dowdall (cdowdall@aaanet.org)

AAA Student Summer Internship – Call for Applications

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to offer two internship opportunities funded by member donations.

Internships are six weeks in length from June 30 through August 8, 2014.  Internships are unpaid however; interns will be provided housing and a meal/travel stipend.

Interns will spend approximately 40 percent of their time working onsite at the AAA offices in Arlington, Virginia, and the other 60 percent of their time working on-site at one of three locations described below.

Eligibility:

  • Undergraduate students in their junior or senior year
  • First Year Graduate students (completing the first year of graduate work by June 2013)

Visit the AAA Summer Internship Program webpage for the application. Application deadline is March 15, 2014.

Click here to support this Internship Program through a financial contribution.

Continue reading

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