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Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Save the date for Webinar Wednesdays!

In 2014, the American Anthropological Association hosts a monthly webinar series on the third Wednesday of the month on a variety of topics to engage anthropologists.

Mark-Aldenderfer_2On March 19, 2014 at 2pm ET, AAA will host a webinar event with Dr. Mark Aldenderfer on the topic of The Bar is Very High:Academic Dossier Evaluation and What to Expect. The webinar will be of particular interest to anthropology graduate students, recent PhDs, as well as AAA Section Leadership and volunteers. The program will cover topics such as:

  • Crafting tenure dossiers and the importance of publishing records (including online publishing)
  • The realities of what PhDs can expect during the tenure evaluation process and being prepared
  • Department culture and the expectations of deans, chairs, admins and colleagues

Mark S. Aldenderfer is an American anthropologist and archaeologist. He is the Dean of the School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts at the University of California, Merced. He has served as Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, and the University of California, Santa Barbara.  Aldenderfer received his Ph.D. from Penn State University in 1977. He is known in particular for his comparative research into high-altitude adaptation and for contributions to quantitative methods in archaeology. He has also served as editor of several journals in anthropology and archaeology.

This webinar is free but registration is required.

Thank You Congress for Increasing Funds for the Social Sciences

Please write to your Senators and House Representatives to thank them for enacting a fiscal year (FY) 2014 appropriations bill that provides increased funding to federal science agencies important to social and behavioral science researchers.  In addition to protecting research budgets, the FY 2014 omnibus bill was free of troublesome policy riders that would have been harmful to the social science research enterprise. Through the Consortium of Social Science Association’s (COSSA) portal, you can find out how your representative voted and send a personalized thank you note.  Please take a moment to thank your elected officials for their efforts to come to final agreement on FY 2014 spending and preserve social science.

Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Save the date for Webinar Wednesdays!

In 2014, the American Anthropological Association will host a monthly webinar series on the third Wednesday of the month on a variety of topics to engage anthropologists.

Rosemary-Joyce_150On February 19, 2014 at 2pm ET, AAA will host a webinar event with Dr Rosemary Joyce on the topic of Best Practices:Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Minorities in Anthropology Programs. The webinar will be of particular interest to anthropology students, faculty, department chairs and administrators. The program will cover topics such as:

•Developing a pipeline—reaching out to minority students through strategic partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and professional organizations

•Inclusive admissions processes—moving away from GRE scores to screen out applicants and looking carefully at GPAs and other indications of academic merit

•Mentoring for retention and completion– clearly defined benchmarks of progress, and formal required consultation of students and faculty to communicate progress and benchmarks


Rosemary Joyce
, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, received the PhD from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1985. Currently Associate Dean of the Graduate Division at Berkeley, she oversees graduate admissions, academic careers, and professional development that annually produce the largest number of doctorates granted to students from under-represented populations. As a member of the anthropological archaeology program at Berkeley, she was a co-recipient of the Leon Henkin Citation for Distinguished Service from the Committee on Student Diversity and Academic Development of Berkeley’s Academic Senate in recognition of the success of the program in increasing diversity. She has been a mentor of undergraduates in the McNair and Mellon-Mays programs and in the UC Presidential Postdoctoral program intended to increase diversity among faculty in academia.

This webinar is free but registration is required. You’ll need the password – anthropology.

AAA Office is Closed Today

The American Anthropological Association office is closed today due to the snow storm.

Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Save the date for Webinar Wednesdays!

In 2014, the American Anthropological Association will host a monthly webinar series on the third Wednesday of the month on a variety of topics to engage anthropologists.

Rosemary-Joyce_150On February 19, 2014 at 2pm ET, AAA will host a webinar event with Dr Rosemary Joyce on the topic of Best Practices:Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Minorities in Anthropology Programs. The webinar will be of particular interest to anthropology students, faculty, department chairs and administrators. The program will cover topics such as:

•Developing a pipeline—reaching out to minority students through strategic partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and professional organizations

•Inclusive admissions processes—moving away from GRE scores to screen out applicants and looking carefully at GPAs and other indications of academic merit

•Mentoring for retention and completion– clearly defined benchmarks of progress, and formal required consultation of students and faculty to communicate progress and benchmarks


Rosemary Joyce
, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, received the PhD from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1985. Currently Associate Dean of the Graduate Division at Berkeley, she oversees graduate admissions, academic careers, and professional development that annually produce the largest number of doctorates granted to students from under-represented populations. As a member of the anthropological archaeology program at Berkeley, she was a co-recipient of the Leon Henkin Citation for Distinguished Service from the Committee on Student Diversity and Academic Development of Berkeley’s Academic Senate in recognition of the success of the program in increasing diversity. She has been a mentor of undergraduates in the McNair and Mellon-Mays programs and in the UC Presidential Postdoctoral program intended to increase diversity among faculty in academia.

This webinar is free but registration is required. You’ll need the password – anthropology.

AAA Student Summer Internship – Call for Applications

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to offer two internship opportunities funded by member donations.

Internships are six weeks in length from June 30 through August 8, 2014.  Internships are unpaid however; interns will be provided housing and a meal/travel stipend.

Interns will spend approximately 40 percent of their time working onsite at the AAA offices in Arlington, Virginia, and the other 60 percent of their time working on-site at one of three locations described below.

Eligibility:

  • Undergraduate students in their junior or senior year
  • First Year Graduate students (completing the first year of graduate work by June 2013)

Visit the AAA Summer Internship Program webpage for the application. Application deadline is March 15, 2014.

Click here to support this Internship Program through a financial contribution.

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2014 Leadership Fellows Program

We are pleased to announce that AAA is now accepting applications to the 2014 Leadership Fellows Program. This program provides a unique opportunity for anthropologists early in their careers to learn about leadership opportunities within the association.  Each year a group of three to five fellows is paired with a mentor chosen from among AAA leadership.  Mentors are available to fellows throughout the year to answer questions related to AAA.  Fellows shadow their mentors at the AAA Annual Meeting in meetings of the Executive Board, Association Committees, and Section Committees. In addition, fellows are invited to attend the AAA Donors Reception and a Leadership Fellows Social bringing together past and present cohorts of fellows.

Past Fellows have told us that their experience in the program “demystified the decision-making processes,” “fostered a strong network for me of young anthropologists,” and “gave me a better sense as to how to manage the AAA meetings.” Many go on to assume leadership roles in sections and committees after their term as a Fellow. According to Rebecca Galemba (U Denver), 2012 Leadership Fellow, had she not participated in the Leadership Fellows Program, she might not have had the courage to apply for undesignated seat on the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology. Heide Castañeda (U South Florida), 2011 Leadership Fellow, credits the Leadership Fellows Program with helping her achieve tenure by bringing visibility to her interest in service and leadership within the larger discipline of anthropology.

Learn more about the benefits of the Leadership Fellows Program and submit your application online. Applications must be submitted by March 15.

All questions should be directed to Courtney Dowdall (cdowdall@aaanet.org).

New Podcast Features Dr. Julienne Rutherford

Listen to the latest podcast, featuring biological anthropologists, Dr. Julienne Rutherford.

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Julienne Rutherford earned her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Indiana University in 2007. She is an assistant professor of Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences and adjunct assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is currently the President of the Midwest Primate Interest Group. She is also the Biological Anthropology Section editor for Anthropology News. She was named a Leadership Fellow by the AAA in 2011, and was the 2013 recipient of the American Society of Primatologists Legacy Award. She was recently named the UIC Researcher of the Year “Rising Star” in the Clinical Sciences.

Rutherford’s research revolves around a central interest in the dynamic maternal environment in which a fetus develops. She is primarily interested in the primate placenta as a signaling interface between mother and fetus. She works with both humans and non-human primates to address questions regarding the effect of maternal ecology (nutrition, life history experience, behavior) on placental morphology, metabolic function, and gene expression and downstream sequelae for offspring health both postnatally and later in life. She has published her multifaceted research in American Anthropologist, Placenta, American Journal of Physical Anthropologists, American Journal of Primatology, American Journal of Human Biology, Obesity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. She recently co-edited the volume Building Babies: Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective. Her research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Society of Primatologists.

Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Save the date for Webinar Wednesdays!

In 2014, the American Anthropological Association will host a monthly webinar series on the third Wednesday of the month on a variety of topics to engage anthropologists.

Rosemary-Joyce_150On February 19, 2014 at 2pm ET, AAA will host a webinar event with Dr Rosemary Joyce on the topic of Best Practices:Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Minorities in Anthropology Programs. The webinar will be of particular interest to anthropology students, faculty, department chairs and administrators. The program will cover topics such as:

•Developing a pipeline—reaching out to minority students through strategic partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and professional organizations

•Inclusive admissions processes—moving away from GRE scores to screen out applicants and looking carefully at GPAs and other indications of academic merit

•Mentoring for retention and completion– clearly defined benchmarks of progress, and formal required consultation of students and faculty to communicate progress and benchmarks


Rosemary Joyce
, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, received the PhD from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1985. Currently Associate Dean of the Graduate Division at Berkeley, she oversees graduate admissions, academic careers, and professional development that annually produce the largest number of doctorates granted to students from under-represented populations. As a member of the anthropological archaeology program at Berkeley, she was a co-recipient of the Leon Henkin Citation for Distinguished Service from the Committee on Student Diversity and Academic Development of Berkeley’s Academic Senate in recognition of the success of the program in increasing diversity. She has been a mentor of undergraduates in the McNair and Mellon-Mays programs and in the UC Presidential Postdoctoral program intended to increase diversity among faculty in academia.

This webinar is free but registration is required. You’ll need the password – anthropology.

New Resource for Emerging Anthropologists

Two important lessons we learned at the 2013 Annual Meeting in Chicago:

1. Recent graduates in anthropology are deeply devoted to the field and motivated to spread the good word. The rising scholars we spoke with had broadly-conceived career goals like ‘make a difference’ and ‘do something meaningful’. And they were eager to introduce anthropology into less-familiar career settings – design anthropology, program evaluation, evidence-based policy, data artistry, digital anthropology, organizational behavior, heritage management, to name a few. Discussions in the hallways, between sessions and workshops, in the Careers Expo and the Section Summit, often centered on the array of career alternatives available to anthropologists and the preparation needs of students in a rapidly evolving job market.

2. Despite all our enthusiastic conversations over the course of the Annual Meeting, we had nowhere to continue the conversation and no central location for keeping in touch with one another.

As a result, we have developed The Engaging Anthropology Forum on Facebook to provide a platform for discussing careers in anthropology. This page will serve as an avenue for recent graduates pursuing careers in academic, applied, and practicing anthropology to share career prep and job search advice, news items spotlighting the work of anthropologists, and information on funding and training opportunities.

We also want to include current students in post-graduation discussion. Soon-to-be anthropologists need to be kept abreast of the evolving job climate and opportunities to prepare early for innovative new careers, so we invite current students and student organizations to join the discussion Forum. So far more than 50 student groups can be found on the Anthropology Clubs Roster (listed under Notes) on the Engaging Anthropology Forum. In addition, the broader field of anthropology can learn much from the enthusiasm of these student groups. Many of the clubs maintain group webpages, including Facebook and Tumblr pages. We invite you to visit their pages and see how they are bringing anthropology to their schools and communities. By sharing these stories, we hope to further incorporate student interests in AAA activities and offer inspiration for ever bigger and better anthropology clubs.

We have some exciting projects in the works for collaboration with up-and-coming anthropologists! We hope that this forum will open new channels for communication among the networks of emerging anthropologists.

Visit the page, let us know what you think, and next time you come across a useful piece of information on careers in anthropology, come share with your colleagues on the Engaging Anthropology Forum!

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