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Intern Preserving Naval Heritage

It has been a very busy couple of weeks since my last post. It is hard to believe that this internship is coming to an end. At the Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) of the History & Heritage Command (NHHC), I have continued to clean and preserve the two brass flash pans as well as work with more of the survey equipment. The photos below are what the artifact looked like before I started to clean it and then during the cleaning process.

Brass Flash Pan during cleaning

Brass Flash Pan during cleaning

Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History & Heritage Command

Brass Flash Pan Prior to cleaning

This past week I was able to go to Williamsburg, VA to test survey equipment out on the water for two days. It was great to actually see everything working after we got all the bugs worked out. This week the UAB is planning on conducting an archaeological survey to relocate a flagship near the D.C. area. I am hoping to be able to spend a day or two working with them on the survey to get as much experience as possible.  In the picture below, the long white object is a magnetometer. Once in  the water, it is towed behind the boat. There is a sensor on the magnetometer that detects changes in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is used to locate ferrous material such as iron that is buried under the seabed.  The sensor then sends a signal to a computer that makes a chart. When the sensor passes over iron on the seabed it makes a bump on the chart. The chart can later be analyzed to find the appropriate location of the wreck. We will be using this magnetometer when we are trying to relocate the flagship.Joshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer InternJoshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer Intern

I have been keeping busy during my free time as well. I drove up to Philadelphia the weekend before last to pickup my wife, May, from the airport and took her to New Jersey.  She is instructing a class at Fort Dix for two weeks. I enjoyed the small amount of time we had together.  This past weekend I learned to double check with the bus drivers around here on where they are actually going. I was planning on taking a bus out to Kent Island, MD to visit my cousin. The bus that was going to Kent Island, MD was actually going to California, MD which is two hours southwest of where I was supposed to be. I ended up getting a ride to a car rental place and drove out to Kent Island. On Saturday, we went out to a beach on my cousins boat and stayed the night. I was able to get up and watch the sun come up Sunday morning through a thick fog. It was a great start to the day.  We went crabbing shortly after I took this picture and caught a few crabs that we later steamed and ate.Joshua Anderson, 2104 AAA Summer Intern

Sunday afternoon my dad and family from Minnesota arrived out in Kent Island. They brought their camper out and are going to be spending the week in the D.C. area checking out all the sites and hanging out with family. When they got here we took a ride on the boat and then went out to eat. We ate at the Crab Deck on Kent Island and took the picture below.  I am looking forward to hanging out with them later this week.Joshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer Intern

After this week is over I am on my way to Fort Dix, NJ for two weeks to instruct a carpentry/masonry class for the army. When I get finished up there I finally get to go home. I will be jumping right into classes at Minnesota State University Mankato (MNSU) where I will continue working with the anthropology department conducting archaeological research.

This internship has allowed me to expand my knowledge, gain experience, and extend my abilities as an anthropologist. While at the American Anthropological Association I was able to aid in the planning process of the very first annual National Anthropology Day.  During my time at the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History & Heritage Command, I was able to work in the lab as well as get experience with some of the equipment in the field. I would like to thank all of the donors, professors at MNSU, and my family for encouraging this educational opportunity and supporting my future career as an anthropologist.Joshua Anderson, 2014 AAA Summer Intern

Taking Action to Preserve Heritage Sites in Mosul

The American Anthropological Association’s  Cultural Heritage Task Force writes to U.S. Secretary of State encouraging the United States to take action in preserving the cultural heritage sites in Mosul, Iraq. Below is a preview, read the entire letter (PDF).Secretary Kerry RE.Mosul

AAA Intern Conducts Underwater Archaeological Survey

Josh Anderson

It sure doesn’t feel like it but, three weeks have gone by since starting my internship. I have been enjoying my time at both the American Anthropological Association (AAA) as well as the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History & Heritage Command (NHHC). Katie and I have been working on a couple projects at the AAA office. One of which is introducing the first annual celebration of National Anthropology Day. We have been brainstorming ideas and coming up with drafts of materials to send to colleges, universities, museums, and other partners to hand out during National Anthropology Day . This will aid in disseminating information about the field of anthropology to others. We are also developing a virtual student poster presentation that will accompany National Anthropology Day activities. The virtual poster presentation will allow students/clubs in all fields of Anthropology to present posters online about their current research or anthropological issues. By presenting online it allows for students/clubs to reach a wide range of anthropologists and other interested parties. Another benefit is that there is not cost for travel or printing.

Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History & Heritage CommandWhile working at the NHHC I have been working on cleaning and preserving two artifacts. These artifacts came from the USS Tulip. USS Tulip was a steam-crew gun boat that, unfortunately, had a steam engine that exploded causing it to sink on November 11, 1864. The artifacts that I have been working with are what seem to be brass flash pans that possibly came from an M 1835/40 Pomeroy or Springfield percussion rifle. I have also continued working with equipment that is used during an underwater archaeological survey. I am enjoying being able to work on a variety of projects at the NHHC. It is allowing me to further understand the process of conducting an archaeological survey underwater and the processes that occur after the survey.

Joshua Anderson

During my free time I have continued to enjoy the sights around the D.C. area, and this past weekend I was able to meet my uncle and cousin for the first time. While I was there my cousin took me out on his boat to go crabbing. It was a great experience and we actually caught a few crabs. When we came back to shore he cooked them up and had a great dinner. I am looking forward to meeting up with them again while I am here.

I would like to thank the donors once again for this opportunity and great experience.

The AAA Summer Internship Program is funded entirely by AAA member donations. Make your contribution today!

Book Your Annual Meeting Hotel at a Discount

113th AAA Annual MeetingThe 2014 Annual Meeting will take place at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel and Omni Shoreham Hotel. Both hotels will host scholarly panels and roundtables, special events, and other activities during the week-long conference.

AAA has negotiated special rates for AAA attendees at both hotels. Reservations can be made online via the links below. These rates are limited and will only last until November 11th. Don’t hesitate and book today!

Annual Meeting Program Now Available

113th AAA Annual Meeting

The program for the 113th AAA Annual Meeting, held December 3-7, 2014 in Washington DC is now available.

Click here to view the program.

Introducing AAA Summer Intern – Katie Patschke

Katie Patschke

My name is Katie Patschke and I was selected to be a summer intern for the American Anthropological Association and the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art through AAA member donations. At the American Anthropological Association I am researching anthropologists and writing biographies that AAA will soon feature. I am currently working on a project with my co-worker Josh Anderson to promote National Anthropology Day through student outreach and advertising.

At the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art I am a curatorial intern where I am working under the supervision of Christine Kreamer on a research project called Creativity of Work that is going to be the foundation for a future exhibition, book, or short film. The research topics included Kongo power figures, masquerade performance, occupations, farming, healing, cooking, art of sacrifice, and gender theory. Through this experience I intend to expand my knowledge of research methods to one day conduct my own research for cultural anthropology regarding gender role issues. I am hoping to continue working for the National Museum of African Art post-graduation in December 2014.

I have lived in DC for two weeks now and have had the opportunity to explore a lot of what DC has to offer. I have visited the American History Museum, the Air and Space Museum, the American Art Museum, the National Zoo and Georgetown cupcakes. I live with 11 other interns who work on Capitol Hill. Every weekend we go out and explore the city of DC. Last weekend we celebrated the 4th of July on the mall. All of us agreed that it was the best firework display that we had ever seen. I also had the opportunity to try out hot yoga and a cycling class. The city is very walkable so every morning I am able to run down the mall to the Lincoln memorial or the white house. I have met a few Washingtonians who all seem to be very helpful and friendly. I am enjoying DC and am looking forward to spending the rest of the summer here.

Anthropologists Uncover Harrowing Statistics On Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

A majority of researchers have knowledge of, been victimized by, or have observed sexual harassment while conducting fieldwork, based on an online survey sample of 666 respondents just published in PLOS One by Kathryn B.H. Clancy (U Illinois-Urbana-Champaign), Robin G. Nelson (Skidmore College), Julienne N. Rutherford (U Illinois-Chicago), Katie Hinde (Harvard U) (Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault).

The study revealed that the majority of those targeted for harassment and assault were undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers. In fact, “women trainees were disproportionately targeted for abuse, with women more often targeted by someone superior to them in the field site hierarchy. We worry this is at least one mechanism driving women from science,” said Dr. Clancy. Dr. Rutherford points out that “previous work by other researchers has shown that being targeted by one’s superior in the workplace has a more severe impact on psychological well-being and job performance than when the perpetrator is a peer, suggesting that women may be even more burdened than men by the phenomenon of workplace sexual aggression.”

In response to the team’s preliminary report at the April 2013 meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) issued a statement declaring zero tolerance for sexual harassment in academic, professional, fieldwork or any other settings where our members work. While the AAA does not have adjudicatory authority over these matters, our Statement of Ethics: Code of Professional Responsibility sets out our clear expectation that anthropologists “…have a responsibility to maintain respectful relationships with others. In mentoring students, interacting with colleagues, working with clients, acting as a reviewer or evaluator, or supervising staff, anthropologists should comport themselves in ways that promote an equitable, supportive and sustainable workplace environment.” Dr. Nelson added, “In many instances, our participants reported a lack of knowledge regarding institutional policies or appropriate reporting channels when misconduct occurs. These results suggested that, in effect, many researchers were ill-equipped to advocate for themselves or others in cases of harassment or assault.”

The AAA has a long-term commitment to improving the status of women in anthropology, and maintains a standing Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology. The Committee is currently developing an educational initiative to better serve members, “Addressing Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment in Anthropology.” Committee Chair, Dr. Jennifer Wies, Associate Professor at Eastern Kentucky University, is leading this initiative. “Anthropologists have been researching and responding to sexual violence and sexual harassment in the field and at home for decades. The continued emphasis on this issue reminds us of the importance of proactive and effective prevention efforts and intervention strategies,” said Wies in an interview earlier today. Dr. Hinde concludes, “The discussion that emerges from the results published in PLOS One today provides an opportunity for our professional communities to come together and effect solutions to improve the experiences of our trainees and colleagues.”

 

 

 

 

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