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It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Nominations Committee Biological Seat: Janice Hutchinson and Katherine MacKinnon

Responsibilities of the Nomination Committee include:

  • To organize information regarding candidates that have been nominated for any AAA elected position (nominees can be self-nominated or by an individual or group of members of the AAA)
  • To make sure that all necessary information has been received by the committee in time for the meeting (especially proof that the nominee has agreed to run and, should s/he win, accept the position)
  • To meet annually to discuss nominations
  • To make recommendations to the Executive Board regarding the candidates for each position
  • To utilize the specific guidelines established by the Executive Board when making recommendation

Click here to learn more about the Nominations Committee.

Janice Hutchinson

Hutchinson_JaniceAs a member of the nomination committee I will work to ensure inclusiveness and diversity in the recruitment of candidates for AAA committees and boards. The goal will always be to not only have representation in terms of diverse areas of research and regional location, but to recruit anthropologists who will bring a broad range of perspectives and understanding of AAA’s mission and plans for achieving ethnic, gender, and regional diversity in the pool of candidates, among other goals. Potential candidates should be able to work collaboratively with other sections, bring ideas to promote our activities and contribute to ongoing issues within the AAA. One issue is the paucity of participation in AAA elections; another is the limited visibility of the AAA in dealing with societal issues that are really at the core of anthropology. I will reach out to sections and individuals on an ongoing basis to identify strong potential candidates.

Katherine MacKinnon

MacKinnon_KatherineAs an active member in the AAA, I am pleased to run for the biological seat on the Nominations Committee. I currently serve as Program Chair of the Biological Anthropology Section (BAS), and as such, have experience that aligns well with the responsibilities of the Nominations Committee. In the past I have served on the AAA Committee on Ethics (2005-2008), and was a member of the Task Force for Comprehensive Ethics Review (2008-2012), charged with overhauling the AAA Code of Ethics. I conduct fieldwork in Central and South America, and more recently Zambia, and since receiving my PhD in 2002 I have held a faculty position at the second-oldest Jesuit research university in the country, Saint Louis University. Although I am a biological anthropologist specializing in primatology, I consider myself first and foremost an anthropologist. My professional self-identity is in large part due to holistic undergraduate and graduate training at the University of California at Berkeley, and also reflects my commitment to an anthropology that employs integrative methodologies and theory to cut across traditional boundaries. As a member of the Nominations Committee, I would bring my experience serving within the AAA organization, and work hard to see that a broad and representative selection of candidates for offices is well-vetted and supported.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Nominations Committee Linguistic Seat: Chaise LaDousa and Shonna Trinch

Responsibilities of the Nomination Committee include:

  • To organize information regarding candidates that have been nominated for any AAA elected position (nominees can be self-nominated or by an individual or group of members of the AAA)
  • To make sure that all necessary information has been received by the committee in time for the meeting (especially proof that the nominee has agreed to run and, should s/he win, accept the position)
  • To meet annually to discuss nominations
  • To make recommendations to the Executive Board regarding the candidates for each position
  • To utilize the specific guidelines established by the Executive Board when making recommendation

Click here to learn more about the Nominations Committee.

Chaise LaDousa

LaDousa_ChaiseI enjoyed working with other members of the Nominations Committee of the Society for Linguistic Anthropology from 2009 to 2012. We discussed attributes of potential candidates and put together slates of candidates. I served as chair of the committee during my last two years of membership. I would appreciate the opportunity to serve on the Nominations Committee of the AAA in the seat designated for linguistics so that I might extend conversations about viable slates to the larger structure of the AAA.

Shonna Trinch

Trinch_ShonnaI would be honored to serve the AAAs by filling the linguistics seat on the Nominations Committee. I have more than 15 years of experience in the profession as a linguistic who was trained in Hispanic languages and linguistics and has worked in modern languages and anthropology departments. In the different departments in which I have worked, I have led search committees for candidates across several disciplines including linguistics, literature, Latino and Latin American studies, anthropology and gender studies. This experience has trained me to organize and manage candidate materials, to cooperate and work with search committee members and to communicate our recommendations to the faculties involved. As a long-standing Faculty Senate member at John Jay College, I have represented the diverse interests of my department to this College-wide body and I have ensured that my colleagues are informed of its work as well. By helping to select candidates for leadership positions in AAAs, I will work hard to complete the tasks necessary. One goal of mine is to ensure that linguistics is represented in the leadership of the AAAs and another is to encourage the selection of linguists who would be bridge-builders between all the fields of anthropology.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for Executive Board Undesignated Seat #3: Keri Brondo and Michael Harkin

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Keri Brondo

Brondo_KeriIf elected, I would embrace the opportunity to collaborate with AAA leadership on addressing challenges facing our association and discipline. I bring over a decade of experience working across AAA sections as Chair of CoGEA and CoPAPIA to advance the status of engaged and practicing anthropology within the AAA, and improve work climate conditions for anthropologists of all genders and identities. My roles as an academic, applied, engaged and activist scholar have led to a deep appreciation for the range of concerns and ambitions of our diverse membership. We must confront the following key issues: 1) underrepresentation of minority populations within the AAA and discipline; 2) alarming rates of sexual harassment; 3) changes to the economics and technologies of scholarly publishing; 4) improving our ability to communicate to multiple audiences both internal and external to the association; 5) our discipline’s public engagement with contemporary environmental, economic, and social crises; 6) the instability of adjunct and other contingent labor forms; and, 7) the responsible redesign of anthropological curriculum such that graduates are prepared to engage the varied nature of anthropological careers. I would be honored to have the opportunity to collaborate across committees, task forces, and sections on these important issues.

Michael Harkin

GE DIGITAL CAMERAI am deeply committed to two things: holistic anthropology and the public university. Anthropology remains the most important and prominent discipline to engage in both scientific and humanistic discourse, and thus to address pressing issues in a multi-faceted way. I support forces that bring subfields such as archaeology and sociocultural anthropology together, and oppose those which drive them apart. The public university is under attack from many directions, including state and federal politicians. I strongly support the historic mission of land grant and other public universities, and what I believe to be the central role of anthropology within that mission. Finally, I believe that anthropology as a discipline needs to be more visible and to take public stands on critical issues.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Today! Webinar on Ethnography and Film with Dr. Harjant Gill

Harjant-GillToday (May 8, 2014) at 2 PM Harjant Gill will lead the fourth installment of AAA’s Webinar Wednesday (mixing it up on THURSDAY).  Harjant Gill is an assistant professor of anthropology at Towson University, Maryland. He received his PhD from American University in 2012. His research examines the intersections of masculinity, modernity and migration in India. Gill is also an award-winning filmmaker and has made several films that have screened at film festivals and academic conferences worldwide. His latest documentary, Roots of Love explores the changing significance of hair and turban among Sikhs and is currently being screened on BBC World News, BBC America, Doordarshan (Indian National TV) and on PBS channels nationwide. Dr. Gill is currently co-directing the Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Film & Media Festival. His website is www.TilotamaProductions.com

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today the featured candidates are for Executive Board Linguistic Seat: Jillian Cavanaugh and Donna Patrick.

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Jillian Cavanaugh

Cavanaugh_JillianI would be honored to serve on the AAA Executive Board in the Linguistic Seat, and am well-prepared to undertake such a position. I served 2009-2013 as Member-at-Large for the Society for Linguistic Anthropology, during which I ran the SLA undergraduate and graduate student essay contests, organizing and heading review committees, managing deadlines and submissions, and giving the awards at the SLA business meeting. In an effort to promote and nurture the next generation of linguistic anthropologists, and strengthen the SLA’s role in mentoring and supporting students, in 2011 I spearheaded the transformation of the graduate contest into a yearly AAA panel in which the winner and runners-up present their work. In 2009-2010, I served as Program Chair-elect and Program Chair, respectively, for the Society for the Anthropology of Europe, organizing the SAE’s AAA program. I co-founded and from 2006 to 2012 convened the New York Linguistic Anthropology Working Group, a regional network of linguistic anthropologists who meet regularly to discuss their work. As a linguistic anthropologist whose work regularly engages with cultural anthropological issues, I am oriented towards engagement across anthropological subdisciplines, and strive to support students, promote opportunities for collegial discussion, and enhance the AAA’s programming and mission.

Donna Patrick

Patrick_DonnaI am delighted to be nominated for the Linguistic Seat of the AAA Executive and would bring to this position a wide range of interests, skills, and experience. My work as a linguistic anthropologist since 1990 has reflected a broad interest in anthropology and brought home the importance of collaborating with local communities and other academics and of integrating ideas from a range of intellectual sources. My administrative experience includes working as an academic program director at two universities as well as three years on the executive board of the Canadian Anthropology Association, four years on the editorial board of the Society for the Anthropology of North America, and five years on the editorial board of the Canadian Modern Language Review, three as Secretary-Treasurer. My experience collaborating with colleagues locally, regionally, and internationally has involved organizing conferences and conference panels, editing academic volumes, and reviewing for academic journals and presses. All of this work has, I believe, provided skills and experience relevant to the position, and would allow me to be both an effective voice for linguistic anthropologists and a strong advocate for greater inclusiveness in the AAA, including a larger presence for Indigenous students and scholars.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for Executive Board Archaeology Seat: Elizabeth Chilton and Deborah Nichols.

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Elizabeth Chilton

Chilton_ElizabethI am honored to have been nominated and selected to run as a candidate for the Executive Board. I have been an active member of AAA since 1989 and consider myself a broadly trained and practicing anthropologist. My research specializations include the archaeology of Northeastern North America, cultural resource management, and heritage studies. I have served AAA as a member of the Archaeology Division’s Nominations Committee (2007-10) and Executive Committee (2010-13). As an archaeologist I have worked for state government, private CRM firms, and both private and public colleges and universities. In my current position as Associate Dean for Research, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, at UMass, I have become even more keenly aware of the challenges for communicating the value of anthropology to the various publics that fund and support our research, teaching, and outreach. I have held a number of administrative roles (Department Chair, Center Director, Field Director) that prepare me well for the responsibilities of the Executive Board: helping to set the vision and strategic direction, safeguarding the organization’s assets, and ensuring the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. I would be pleased to have the opportunity to contribute more strongly to AAA.

Deborah Nichols

Nichols_DebAAA provides a broad umbrella for anthropology’s rich diversity within and among its subfields. AAA’s large publication program is essential to the discipline to present the breadth of anthropology’s knowledge and insights and to engage wider audiences within and beyond anthropology. To adapt and take advantage of the changing landscape for academic publishing, AAA’s publishing program will become fully digital. The transition will present challenges, but it also affords opportunities to take greater advantage of electronic publishing and ensure that the publishing program is sustainable and able to adapt to future changes. A strong publishing program is important to our current members and to attract future members. I would bring to the Executive Board an international engagement with anthropology, first-hand knowledge of the association, and leadership experience. I have been elected as president of the Archaeology Division and was twice elected Section Assembly Convener, and I have chaired the Association’s Operating Committee and the Committee for the Future and Print and Electronic Publishing. I have served on the Executive Board of the Society for Economic Anthropology and on editorial boards including for American Anthropologist, the Annual Review of Anthropology, and Ancient Mesoamerica.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for Executive Board Biological Seat: Geoff Clark and Lorena Madrigal.

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Geoff Clark

Clark_GeoffTo paraphrase the Wenner-Gren Foundation, I take anthropology to be the ‘world sciences of humankind’ and our mandate to be to arrive at a better understanding of our biological and cultural heritage as social primates both in the past and the present. My own field, paleoanthropology, approaches this goal by integrating human paleontology, paleolithic archaeology, molecular biology, primatology and allied disciplines under the overarching conceptual framework of evolutionary biology. Like its founders, I think paleoanthropology has something unique to contribute to a better understanding of the human career and that all its subfields can potentially play a role in doing that. But we must not only tackle the big intellectual issues (e.g., what does it mean, biologically and culturally, to be a ‘modern human’?), but also try to convey this knowledge to an American public famously skeptical of science. If we abdicate our responsibility to take principled stands on controversial public issues central to the very areas of our own expertise, we surrender the stage to those less qualified than we to make informed contributions to the resolution of these issues. If elected, I would emphasize this ‘activist’ aspect of our field – contesting the claims of the various anti- and pseudo-science constituencies arrayed against us.

Lorena Madrigal

Madrigal_LorenaAs an active member of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, I am aware of the fact that there are many members of the AAPA who are not members of the AAA. In the past, some of us in the AAPA have felt that biological anthropology has not had a place of importance within the AAA. However, this has changed. In my own experience in a AAA committee, I have been able to see how biological anthropology has been incorporated and welcomed. My hope is that if I am elected in one of the Executive Board Biological Seats, AAPA members will see a familiar name in the AAA board, given that I just stepped down from the presidency of the AAPA. If I am elected to this position, my goal is to represent the interests of biological anthropologists, and therefore, to bring more biological anthropologists into the fold of the AAA. People are more likely to join an association if they see themselves, and their interests represented in it. In sum, I will stand up for biological anthropology in the AAA.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Today! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

If you missed today’s webinar, stream it now: http://bit.ly/1jvlnDK

New Webinar! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

2014 AAA Summer Interns Announced

Through generous member donations, two anthropology students, Joshua Anderson and Katie Patschke, will have the opportunity to spend this summer working with the AAA as part of the Association’s Summer Internship Program. They will also work with partnering host organizations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The students were selected from more than fifty candidates based on their field of anthropological interest, academic strength, and recommendations from their professors.

Joshua AndersonJoshua Anderson is a senior at Minnesota State University – Mankato, and majors in anthropology with an emphasis on archaeology. He has a technical degree in Honda and Yamaha motorcycle mechanics from Universial Technical Institute in Phoenix, AZ. Joshua has served in the United States Army Reserves for 12 years, serving two deployments. Currently, he is an instructor teaching Carpentry/Masonry courses as well as actively working as a field supervisor for a county-wide archaeological survey at Minnesota State University – Mankato. As an AAA summer intern, Joshua will intern with Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC). NHHC is the official history program of the Department of the Navy. He will be working with the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the NHHC and will be conducting archaeological and historical research, synthesizing field information to prepare policy and case studies, as well as conserving artifacts and assisting with the inventory, management and artifact loan programs.

Katie PatschkeKatie Patschke, is a junior at Susquehanna University. She will graduate December 2014 with a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, Anthropology, and Studio Art. She is an active student leader who currently holds three president positions for clubs as well as being a member of the service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega. Katie will intern with the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and be placed in the museum’s curatorial department where her tasks would include research on gender theory and object-based work related to a future exhibition on the contributions of, and issues addressed by, African contemporary woman artists.

Both Anderson and Patschke will also spend a portion of their time at the AAA offices, where they will be working with the Association’s public education program, RACE: Are We So Different?, researching various pieces of Federal legislation and regulatory initiatives and sharing their internship experience with members in Association publications and social media.

The AAA Summer Internship Program is in its fourth consecutive year. The internship provides professional experience to anthropology students and assists in shaping the foundation of their anthropological careers. This program is fully funded through member donations.

Make a donation to the Summer Internship Program, today!

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