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Last day to vote for your favorite photo

Voting in the 2013 AAA Photo Contest is now open to current AAA members through today, September 30, 2013.The voting system displays thumbnails of each photo. To review galleries with larger images of the entries, please visit the Knowledge Exchange section of Anthropology News.

You may also link directly to galleries of each of the categories:

Voters will be able to select 9 out of 39 photos in the People category, 6 out of 24 photos in the Place category, and 5 out of 19 photos in the Process and Practice category. Winning photos will be displayed at the annual meeting in Chicago and will also appear in Anthropology News.

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to encourage members to share their field experiences and demonstrate the breadth of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists are pursuing today, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.

Ready to vote? Click here .

Questions?If you have any questions or comments, email Amy Goldenberg at photos@aaanet.org.

Vote for your Favorite Photo

Voting in the 2013 AAA Photo Contest is now open to current AAA members through September 30, 2013.The voting system displays thumbnails of each photo. To review galleries with larger images of the entries, please visit the Knowledge Exchange section of Anthropology News.

You may also link directly to galleries of each of the categories:

Voters will be able to select 9 out of 39 photos in the People category, 6 out of 24 photos in the Place category, and 5 out of 19 photos in the Process and Practice category. Winning photos will be displayed at the annual meeting in Chicago and will also appear in Anthropology News.

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to encourage members to share their field experiences and demonstrate the breadth of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists are pursuing today, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.

Ready to vote? Click here .

Questions?If you have any questions or comments, email Amy Goldenberg at photos@aaanet.org.

RFP – Small Grants for Developing Ethics Curricular Materials

The AAA Small Grants Program seeks to foster the development and use of curricular materials for the teaching and communication of ethics and ethical practice across the discipline of anthropology. Administered by the AAA Committee on Ethics, this small grant program encourages the awareness of and innovation in ethics curricular materials used in introductory, undergraduate, and graduate classes. Proposals for the development of curricular materials in a variety of forms are welcome, including texts, films, blogs, websites, exhibits, and other innovative media forms.  The grant recipient(s) will have ten months to complete these new curricular materials, the results of which will be featured in the “Ethical Currents” column of the December issue of Anthropology News as well as on the AAA ethics blog, and highlighted at the Annual Meeting.

The deadline for proposals is November 8, 2013.

Click here for eligibility, proposal format and submission details.

Julie Livingston Receives MacArthur Fellowship

Congratulations to Dr. Julie Livingston (Rutgers U)! Recently named a 2013 MacArthur Fellow, she is a medical historian who combines archival research with ethnography to explore the care and treatment of individuals suffering from chronic illnesses and debilitating ailments in Botswana. Click here to learn more about Dr. Livingston and her research. Click on the below image to watch an excerpt about her fellowship:

Julie Livingston

Julie was one of 24 individuals recognized in this year’s class of MacArthur Fellows. The press release by the MacArthur Foundation describes this class as “extraordinarily creative people who inspire us all”:

MacArthur named its 2013 class of MacArthur Fellows, recognizing 24 exceptionally creative individuals with a track record of achievement and the potential for even more significant contributions in the future.

Fellows will each receive a no-strings-attached stipend of $625,000 (increased from $500,000) paid out over five years. Without stipulations or reporting requirements, the Fellowship provides maximum freedom for recipients to follow their own creative vision.

“This year’s class of MacArthur Fellows is an extraordinary group of individuals who collectively reflect the breadth and depth of American creativity,” said Cecilia Conrad, Vice President, MacArthur Fellows Program. “They are artists, social innovators, scientists, and humanists who are working to improve the human condition and to preserve and sustain our natural and cultural heritage. Their stories should inspire each of us to consider our own potential to contribute our talents for the betterment of humankind.”

AAA Director of Meetings Named National Top 40 Under 40

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Jason G. Watkins. CMP

Jason G. Watkins, CMP

Jason G. Watkins, Director of Meetings and Conferences has been honored in the nation’s Top Forty under 40 by the Association Forum of Chicagoland and USAE weekly newspaper. In this inaugural award, Jason was selected from nearly 150 applicants who work for associations and nonprofits across the country. Applicants were judged on their roles that have contributed to and continue to aid the future of the association and nonprofit community, and their leadership skills and potential. Congratulations Jason!

2014 Building Future Faculty Program Announcement

North Carolina State University will offer the 2014 Building Future Faculty Program on April 2-5, 2014. This is an all-expenses paid workshop for diverse graduate students and post-docs who are preparing for a faculty career. It is targeted to students who are currently about one year away from beginning a faculty job search. The workshop provides information about what to expect as a faculty member, the kinds of resources available to faculty for teaching, and the type of research productivity that is expected of faculty. During the workshop, participants spend time with faculty and department heads in their discipline discussing how to best prepare for this type of work, what the life of a faculty member is like, and receiving personal tips and feedback. The program aims to increase faculty diversity and inclusion.

Click here for more information about the 2014 Building Future Faculty Program is available at  along with the application form. Applications are due by November 10, 2013. For more information, contact Marcia Gumpertz (gumpertz@ncsu.edu).

Why Students Should Attend the AAA Careers Expo

Today’s guest blog post is by Kyle Simpson. Kyle is a graduate student in Anthropology at the University of Memphis.

When I tell people that I am working towards a Master’s Degree in Anthropology, the question is always the same, “What are you going to do with that?” I usually laugh and tell them that after my MA I plan to get a PhD and then teach at a university. But the truth is, like many graduate students, I don’t know what jobs are available to anthropologists outside of the academy.

2012 Careers Expo

2012 Careers Expo

This is why I’m looking forward to attending this year’s AAA meetings in Chicago. I’ve never been to our profession’s annual conference but will be attending this year. The event I’m most excited about is the Careers Expo. Each year, the NAPA/AAA-CoPAPIA sponsored Careers Expo brings together a variety of professional anthropologists representing widely diverse career paths. They have found employment in government, private, and non-profit organizations. In previous years, there have been representatives from Veteran’s Administration, Centers for Disease Control, Yahoo, Sapient, State Farm, CRM firms like ACE and SRI, and anthropological consulting firms like LTG Associates. While it is not a job fair, the Careers Expo provides a great opportunity for networking with practicing/professional anthropologists. Until recently, I was unaware that most of the work being conducted by anthropologists takes place outside of the academy, but several studies have shown that the vast majority of anthropologists do not work in the academic setting. Therefore, it is important for students to get a better sense of what they can do with their degree. The Careers Expo seems like the perfect way to learn about the diverse career options for graduating MA and PhD students.

Attendees will be exposed to a variety of anthropological career paths and will also have the opportunity to talk to anthropologists who have made the transition from the academy to practice. This is a chance to ask questions about making that transition, why you should think about pursuing a career in practice, and how to prepare yourself before graduating for a career in practice. Because this is not a job fair, there is no pressure on attendees. This should allow students to feel more comfortable in their interactions with exhibitors because the environment is informal and the conversations are casual.

The Careers Expo is one of the most heavily attended events at the AAAs. I heard that over 500 people attended it last year and the AAA expects even more to attend this year!

This year the Careers Expo will be held on Friday, November 22nd from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Exhibit Hall at the Chicago Hilton. To register, click here. I look forward to seeing you there!

Dr. Nancy Scheper-Hughes Named First AAA Public Policy Award Winner

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) is pleased to announce that its Committee on Public Policy has selected medical anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes as the first recipient of the new Anthropology in Public Policy Award. Dr. Scheper- Hughes is a nationally-recognized expert on several important health issues, including hunger, illness and organ trafficking.

Photo Courtesy of UC Berkeley

Photo Courtesy of UC Berkeley

The Anthropology in Public Policy Award (AiPP) was established in 2012 by the Committee on Public Policy (COPP) to honor anthropologists whose work has had a significant, positive influence on the course of government decision-making and action. Dr. Scheper-Hughes’ body of work and research, especially in the area of organ trafficking, has shaped how governments and international bodies address the issues of illegal transplantation.

In 1999, Scheper-Hughes helped found the Berkeley Organs Watch Project, an organization dedicated to research on human organ traffic worldwide, including examining the transnational networks that connect patients, transplant surgeons, brokers, medical facilities and so-called “live donors.” Almost ten years later, in 2008, her investigation of an international group of organ sellers based in the East Coast of the United States and Israel led to multiple arrests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In recent years, she has served as an advisor or consultant to the European Union; the United Nations, Division of Law Enforcement, Organized Crime and Anti-Laundering Office on Drugs and Crime, and the Human Trafficking Office of the World Health Organization in Vienna. She has also testified as an expert before the US Congress, the Council of Europe and the British House of Lords.

“We are pleased and honored to make Dr. Scheper-Hughes the winner of the first AiPP Award,” COPP chair Dr. Suzanne Heurtin-Roberts announced in a statement today. “Her work and research offer powerful examples of the contribution our discipline can make to larger public policy debates.  By recognizing her as thefirst recipient of the award, we are making a strong statement about the power and effectiveness our discipline can have with regulators and legislators worldwide. ”

COPP will honor Dr. Scheper-Hughes on during the 112th AAA Annual Meeting. The meeting is open to the public, registration is required.

Dr. Scheper-Hughes is a professor of anthropology and Director of the Medical Anthropology Program at the University of California at Berkeley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvard Anthropologist Honored by Japanese Cultural Affairs Agency

The Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University recently announced that it current Director, Theodore C. Bestor, received the Commissioner of Cultural Affairs Award for the Promotion of Japanese Culture from the Agency of Cultural Affairs in Japan.  The Agency of Cultural Affairs is a special body of the of the Japanese Ministry of Education, established in 1968 to promote Japanese arts and culture. Dr. Bestor is the twelfth person to receive the honor.

Who Teaches the Teachers?

In 2008, the Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education surveyed more than 3,000 PhDs to help “assess the career paths of PhDs and the quality of doctoral education in U.S. social science programs.” Many of their findings are very interesting in their own right, but Table 17 is the starting point for this post: only 37% of the respondents reported that there was formal instruction in teaching available in their doctoral programs; fewer than that (34%) reported formal supervision and evaluation of their teaching.

This raises the question: How, where, and when do most anthropologists who go on to teach learn how to teach?

Assuming that the answer is that most anthropologists are self-taught in the ways of the classroom through failure and success, I thought our autodidacts might be interested in some resources.

This 1999 Science article offers some good reflections on the topic. Its suggestions for resources include: Talk about teaching with your colleagues.

For some, with limited departmental or extradepartmental possibilities, this is harder to do and these readers might want to check out the AAA Teaching Materials Exchange to help pool and share ideas. Contribute your assignments, ideas, and syllabus. Investigate new readings and fresh discussion ideas. Contact your fellow teachers.

For others, this chatter might be virtual. The RAI developed a teaching forum. A huge number of our members have blogs (Anthro Brown Bag, Living Anthropologically, and Neuroanthropology come to the fore of my mind because they have content on teaching) for exploring and honing pedagogical ideas.

In the meanwhile, maybe you want to share your story of how, where and when you learned how to teach anthropology.

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