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Introducing AAA Summer Intern – Katie Patschke

Katie Patschke

My name is Katie Patschke and I was selected to be a summer intern for the American Anthropological Association and the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art through AAA member donations. At the American Anthropological Association I am researching anthropologists and writing biographies that AAA will soon feature. I am currently working on a project with my co-worker Josh Anderson to promote National Anthropology Day through student outreach and advertising.

At the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art I am a curatorial intern where I am working under the supervision of Christine Kreamer on a research project called Creativity of Work that is going to be the foundation for a future exhibition, book, or short film. The research topics included Kongo power figures, masquerade performance, occupations, farming, healing, cooking, art of sacrifice, and gender theory. Through this experience I intend to expand my knowledge of research methods to one day conduct my own research for cultural anthropology regarding gender role issues. I am hoping to continue working for the National Museum of African Art post-graduation in December 2014.

I have lived in DC for two weeks now and have had the opportunity to explore a lot of what DC has to offer. I have visited the American History Museum, the Air and Space Museum, the American Art Museum, the National Zoo and Georgetown cupcakes. I live with 11 other interns who work on Capitol Hill. Every weekend we go out and explore the city of DC. Last weekend we celebrated the 4th of July on the mall. All of us agreed that it was the best firework display that we had ever seen. I also had the opportunity to try out hot yoga and a cycling class. The city is very walkable so every morning I am able to run down the mall to the Lincoln memorial or the white house. I have met a few Washingtonians who all seem to be very helpful and friendly. I am enjoying DC and am looking forward to spending the rest of the summer here.

Anthropologists Uncover Harrowing Statistics On Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

A majority of researchers have knowledge of, been victimized by, or have observed sexual harassment while conducting fieldwork, based on an online survey sample of 666 respondents just published in PLOS One by Kathryn B.H. Clancy (U Illinois-Urbana-Champaign), Robin G. Nelson (Skidmore College), Julienne N. Rutherford (U Illinois-Chicago), Katie Hinde (Harvard U) (Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault).

The study revealed that the majority of those targeted for harassment and assault were undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers. In fact, “women trainees were disproportionately targeted for abuse, with women more often targeted by someone superior to them in the field site hierarchy. We worry this is at least one mechanism driving women from science,” said Dr. Clancy. Dr. Rutherford points out that “previous work by other researchers has shown that being targeted by one’s superior in the workplace has a more severe impact on psychological well-being and job performance than when the perpetrator is a peer, suggesting that women may be even more burdened than men by the phenomenon of workplace sexual aggression.”

In response to the team’s preliminary report at the April 2013 meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) issued a statement declaring zero tolerance for sexual harassment in academic, professional, fieldwork or any other settings where our members work. While the AAA does not have adjudicatory authority over these matters, our Statement of Ethics: Code of Professional Responsibility sets out our clear expectation that anthropologists “…have a responsibility to maintain respectful relationships with others. In mentoring students, interacting with colleagues, working with clients, acting as a reviewer or evaluator, or supervising staff, anthropologists should comport themselves in ways that promote an equitable, supportive and sustainable workplace environment.” Dr. Nelson added, “In many instances, our participants reported a lack of knowledge regarding institutional policies or appropriate reporting channels when misconduct occurs. These results suggested that, in effect, many researchers were ill-equipped to advocate for themselves or others in cases of harassment or assault.”

The AAA has a long-term commitment to improving the status of women in anthropology, and maintains a standing Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology. The Committee is currently developing an educational initiative to better serve members, “Addressing Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment in Anthropology.” Committee Chair, Dr. Jennifer Wies, Associate Professor at Eastern Kentucky University, is leading this initiative. “Anthropologists have been researching and responding to sexual violence and sexual harassment in the field and at home for decades. The continued emphasis on this issue reminds us of the importance of proactive and effective prevention efforts and intervention strategies,” said Wies in an interview earlier today. Dr. Hinde concludes, “The discussion that emerges from the results published in PLOS One today provides an opportunity for our professional communities to come together and effect solutions to improve the experiences of our trainees and colleagues.”

 

 

 

 

Introducing the 2014 AAA Summer Intern – Joshua Anderson

Joshua Anderson

Hello, my name is Joshua Anderson. I am one of two college students that received the 2014 American Anthropological Association’s (AAA) Summer Internship. I would first like to thank all the donors who made this possible, my advisor at Minnesota State University Mankato, Dr. Ronald Schirmer, for helping me with the application process and recommendation letter, as well as Dr. Heath Anderson for providing me with the information about this internship.

I am also interning with the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) for three days out of the week. During the first week of my internship with the NHHC I was tasked to read some selected literature to get familiar with Underwater Archaeology. I have also been helping with getting equipment ready for a future survey that will be conducted shortly after I leave. Some of this equipment has not been used for a few years and needs some of the kinks worked out to make sure that there will be no problems when it is collecting data. As my internship continues, I will be working more with the equipment and getting some hands on experience in the lab learning the curation and preservation process.

For two days during the week I am at the AAA office working with another intern, Katie Patschke. The first day was full of meetings. We met with each department within the AAA office. This was a huge help in getting to know everyone in the office and what their job was. We have also been working on biographies of some well know anthropologists that will be used to acknowledge their accomplishments.

When I am not working I have been enjoying the sights of Washington D.C. I have visited almost all of the Smithsonian museums and explored most of the area around Capitol Hill. When working in the AAA office I like to treat myself to a movie after I get off work. The movie theater has very comfortable reclining seats which make for a good place to relax and wind down for the day. I have also been enjoying all of the varieties of food and festivals that D.C. has to offer. I was able to go to the Folk Festival that the Smithsonian puts on in the National Mall. I learned a lot about the history and culture of both Kenya and China, and was able to try some of their authentic food. It was delicious.

I would like to thank all the donors once again for making this happen and I look forward to getting as much experience as I can during this internship.

Prominent Anthropologist Welcomes Football Team Name Trademark Cancellation

In a move that was hailed by the anthropological community, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office announced on Wednesday morning that it had canceled six federal trademark registrations for the name “Washington Redskins” citing testimony and evidence that the Washington, DC- based football team’s name is “disparaging to Native Americans” and thus in violation of federal trademark laws banning offensive terms and language.

While the decision today means that the team can continue to use the term, the phrase is no longer owned by the organization, meaning it will be difficult to stop others from using the term, and thus limiting its financial benefit to the club.

Dr. Bernard C. Perley, a Native American and anthropologist, released the following statement in the wake of the government’s decision:

Today, I am celebrating the US Patent and Trademark Office’s decision to cancel the six trademark registrations of the NFL Washington professional football team. The Patent and Trademark Office made their decision based on evidence and concluded that the trademark (the “r word”) is “disparaging to Native Americans at the respective times they were registered”.

This decision represents the best values of the American people as established in the founding documents of the United States. It also echoes the work of generations of anthropologists who have worked and continue to work with Native American communities to promote social justice for the first peoples of the Americas.

Unfortunately, there are many Americans who will make any excuse to support the NFL and the Washington team in their defense of the disrespectful name. The ruling does not prevent the team from continuing to use the derogatory term and it is likely the team will appeal the decision.

The US Patent and Trademark decision is good news but there is still much work to be done. The public debate over the “r word” has contributed to the growing awareness of the American public regarding the derogatory aspect of the term to many Native Americans. Anthropology can support and enhance that awareness by making public the ongoing work of anthropologists and Native American community leaders in promoting respect and understanding. We can accomplish this by disseminating the inspiring stories of Native American resilience and their contributions to the American experience.”

Dr. Perley is also a member of the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association

 

New Podcast Features Barbara Clark

B.ClarkListen to Barbara Clark in our newest podcast speak about her research in aviation discourse and safety. Dr. Clark is a visiting research fellow at the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, Queen Mary, University of London. During a career in aviation as a flight attendant, Dr. Clark was inspired to join her passions for the aviation community and that of language and linguistics. She return to graduate school to earn a Masters and PhD in Linguistics from Queen Mary, University of London.

Learn about Dr. Clark’s research as she explores the communications of the aviation community and its impact on operations and safety as well as creation of sociocultural sub-communities.

 

 

Is Cultural Anthropology Really Disembodied?

Today’s guest blog post is by the President of the American Anthropological Association, Monica Heller.

Nicholas Wade’s recent book, A Troublesome Inheritance, is not one I would typically spend my weekends reading, as I don’t have much interest examining theories of everything in this world and little patience for theories as misguided as those examined in his book. But as science editor at The New York Times Wade wields influence, and his book reserves a special role for the American Anthropological Association (AAA), an organization of which I happen to be the current President. Unfortunately, that role is of the bad guy in a narrative opposing two figures: benighted cultural anthropology and « politically incorrect » but scientifically accurate theories of cultural evolution.

Those scientific theories, he says, show that race is a central feature of human biology, and that it has a genetic basis, which then influences social behaviour, some of which is more « successful » than others – not surprisingly, the behaviour he characterizes as « well adapted » is characteristic of Caucasians, and especially of Western Europeans. But it’s okay, he reassures us, the rest of us (well, you – I’m Jewish, and according to Wade astonishingly well-adapted, though the Sephardic bits might slow me down) can learn, and our genes can look Caucasian too! There are many problems with this argument, of course, notably the frequent confusion of correlation and causation, and the frequent omission of consideration of alternative hypotheses (for example, the equating of IQ measurements with an individual intelligence trait, as opposed to, say, the ability to write standardized tests). I will let my colleagues in biological anthropology address those that they are best-placed to discuss.

My own major surprise showed up on page 3. Using a single study of age of first reproduction on Isle-aux-Coudres (Quebec) between 1799-1940, Wade argues that a drop of four years over that time period is evidence of genetic adaptation with permanent consequences, and hence of contemporary evolution. Wade also uses such examples to argue that genetics are the basis of such social behaviours, while simultaneously arguing that genetic changes result from social conditions. I am from Quebec, as it happens, and have devoted years of study to francophone Canada. I’ve driven by Isle-aux-Coudres on many occasions (it is very pretty, you should go). I know a little about the political economy of reproduction in francophone Canada, enough anyway to know that (and why) it went from having one of the highest birth rates in the First World (and relatively low age of first reproduction) through to about 1960, to having one of the lowest in one generation – a rate which has subsequently persisted, with concomitant relatively high age of first reproduction. (And I know enough about l’Isle-aux-Coudres to know there is no reason to believe things would be different there.) And I’m not even a biological anthropologist.

Indeed, as President of the AAA, I could not help but notice that Wade portrays contemporary cultural anthropology as entirely represented by the American Anthropological Association (though admittedly, Wade doesn’t always get the association’s name right; let’s hope his copy editors catch those errors). Next, he portrays it as entirely founded on the work of Franz Boas, as though no one has had an original thought or a critique of Boas in the last 100 years or so. Third, he portrays the association as entirely devoted to a particular form of cultural anthropology which Wade decries as refusing to acknowledge biology altogether because it is a victim of its ideology; this will likely surprise both cultural anthropologists and AAA sections like the Evolutionary Anthropology Society as much as it surprised me. I am sure such oversimplification and reduction is useful for a book hoping to make a single point to a general public, but it concerns me that it should come from the person responsible for the science section of the New York Times. The cultural anthropology character in Wade’s book (that would be the one wearing a blindfold and erring in mists of its own creation) is not one I remember ever having encountered.

But what really concerns me, in the end, is the force of theories of race and cultural evolution. The fictive naturalization of what are fundamentally relations of power is, actually, terrifying. It would be lovely to think that they are too silly to waste our time on, but Wade’s book shows that they are not going away any time soon, and that we need to redouble our efforts to show them up for what they are: attempts to justify inequality. It would be nice to have The New York Times on our side. We have a few black hats to share.

 

AAA Collaborates in Support of Egypt/U.S. Memorandum of Understanding

In collaboration with the American Schools for Oriental Research, the Archaeological Institute of America, and the Society of American Archaeology, AAA President Monica Heller expresses support for the proposed Memorandum of Understanding between the United States and the Arab Republic of Egypt that will be considered by CPAC at its upcoming public meeting on June 2 of this year.

Below is an excerpt, read the entire letter here:

We, the undersigned, are writing to express our collective support for the proposed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the United States and the Arab Republic of Egypt that will be considered by CPAC at its upcoming public meeting on June 2, 2014. Our organizations represent the primary professional bodies for the fields of archaeology, anthropology, and Egyptology as well as many interested members of the public. Our collective membership of over 230,000 has a strong interest in the long-term research, preservation, presentation, and safeguarding of the heritage of Egypt.

Modern-day Egypt is host to some of the oldest and most significant archaeological remains in the world. The geographic diversity and temporal representation of the archaeological and historical material of Egypt covers fabled monuments, such as those related to the rich Pharaonic past and the Roman and Byzantine periods, as well as places and complexes of the Islamic, Ottoman, and Christian inhabitants, many still in use today. Whether woven into the urban fabric of the cities of Cairo or Alexandria, or situated in the rural areas of the Fayum, Sinai, and Upper Egypt, the cultural landscapes of Egypt represent a palimpsest of time. The proposed MoU imposes import restrictions on archaeological material from the Early Dynastic Period through the New Kingdom period as well as on the more recent Islamic material, ending with the Ottoman conquest of Egypt in 1517.

Our call for action under this MoU recognizes the significant place of history from Egypt in our collective lives, from the plazas of Rome to the halls of U.S. institutions; from the covers of National Geographic, Archaeology magazine, and the New York Times to the stories told by National Public Radio and Fox News. The indelible position of Egypt in our understanding of the ancient history of writing and medicine, as well as the histories of museum practice, the preservation movement, and tourism development, notably in Cairo and at Abu Simbel, all offer sound evidence for the importance of protecting the Egyptian past. An MoU offers further opportunity to expand cultural relationships between the United States and Egypt. The MoU enables and encourages collaborative initiatives that aim to support research, to preserve archaeological and historical places, to promote educational exchange programs, and to quell activities that contribute to the illicit trafficking of Egyptian heritage.

Read the entire letter here.

Today! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

If you missed today’s webinar, stream it now: http://bit.ly/1jvlnDK

New Webinar! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

Green Options for AAA Members

Earth Day is a great opportunity to remember the green options that the American Anthropological Association offers to its members:

AAA Journals To Go Fully Digital in 2016

pub modelReaders may recall that in November 2013, the AAA Executive Board adopted a series of recommendations from the Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing that embrace new ways of producing and distributing its journals and endeavor to get the association’s publishing program on sustainable footing. One of the several changes includes member print copies becoming fully digital starting in 2016. Individual members can purchase, at cost, a print subscription to any journal published by sections that member has joined if they wish to receive the print copy.

Don’t want to wait until 2016 for your digital copies? You can help lower our ecological footprint today by opting out of receiving AAA’s print journals. 14 section journals are currently participating in this special green initiative. Receive the same great content online as you would in the print version. Contact Members Services to participate today.

Green Annual Meeting Registration

2014-AAA-Annual-Mtg-logo-Small-CMYKMore than 25% of meeting attendees last year opted for the Green Registration. Offered at a discounted rate, the green registration offsets AAA’s carbon footprint by choosing to use an e-reader formatted program, online personal scheduler and/or the AAA Annual Meeting Mobile app to navigate the conference. Thus far, more than 30% of meeting registrants have opted to go green. Meeting Registration is going on now, if you haven’t already, opt to go Green today!

The Anthropology and the Environment Section offer guidelines, called “Greening the Meeting,” to help meeting participants reduce their carbon footprint. Their suggestions include individual choices to be made about transportation, use of standard hotel services, and communications.

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