• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 17,225 other followers

New Webinar! A Discussion On Genes, Race and Human History

Join us on Monday, May 5 at 1pm EST for a lively webinar, A Troublesome Inheritance – A discussion on genes, race and human history with author Nicholas Wade and Agustín Fuentes. This discussion will be moderated by AAA Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow.

Photo by The New York Times

Photo by The New York Times

Nicholas Wade received a B.A. in natural sciences from King’s College, Cambridge. He was deputy editor of Nature magazine in London and then became that journal’s Washington correspondent. He joined Science magazine in Washington as a reporter and later moved to The New York Times, where he has been an editorial writer, concentrating his writing on issues of defense, space, science, medicine, technology, genetics, molecular biology, the environment, and public policy, a science reporter, and a science editor. Wades latest book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (Penguin Press) will be available on May 6.

2012 Explorer PortraitAgustín Fuentes, trained in zoology and anthropology, is a professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Fuentes completed a B.A. in Zoology and Anthropology, and an M.A.& Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research delves into the how and why of being human. From chasing monkeys in the jungles and cities of Asia, to exploring the lives of our evolutionary ancestors, to examining what people actually do across the globe, Professor Fuentes is interested in both the big questions and the small details of what makes humans and our closest relatives tick. Fuentes is author of Race, Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths About Human Nature (University of California Press).

The webinar is free; however, registration is required.

Green Options for AAA Members

Earth Day is a great opportunity to remember the green options that the American Anthropological Association offers to its members:

AAA Journals To Go Fully Digital in 2016

pub modelReaders may recall that in November 2013, the AAA Executive Board adopted a series of recommendations from the Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing that embrace new ways of producing and distributing its journals and endeavor to get the association’s publishing program on sustainable footing. One of the several changes includes member print copies becoming fully digital starting in 2016. Individual members can purchase, at cost, a print subscription to any journal published by sections that member has joined if they wish to receive the print copy.

Don’t want to wait until 2016 for your digital copies? You can help lower our ecological footprint today by opting out of receiving AAA’s print journals. 14 section journals are currently participating in this special green initiative. Receive the same great content online as you would in the print version. Contact Members Services to participate today.

Green Annual Meeting Registration

2014-AAA-Annual-Mtg-logo-Small-CMYKMore than 25% of meeting attendees last year opted for the Green Registration. Offered at a discounted rate, the green registration offsets AAA’s carbon footprint by choosing to use an e-reader formatted program, online personal scheduler and/or the AAA Annual Meeting Mobile app to navigate the conference. Thus far, more than 30% of meeting registrants have opted to go green. Meeting Registration is going on now, if you haven’t already, opt to go Green today!

The Anthropology and the Environment Section offer guidelines, called “Greening the Meeting,” to help meeting participants reduce their carbon footprint. Their suggestions include individual choices to be made about transportation, use of standard hotel services, and communications.

Multimedia in Anthropology News Articles on Cultural Heritage

AN banner

Anthropology News (AN) is excited to present two essays in our series on Cultural Heritage that feature multimedia content and demonstrate how anthropologists can incorporate new technologies into their work and writing. By using multimedia technologies, readers are able to engage with and experience articles on AN in new and exciting ways. Contributors to Anthropology News can also use this technology to bring further texture to their research, analysis and writing. We encourage readers and contributors to try it out!

Multimedia in the Cultural Heritage Series

Antoinette T. Jackson’s article, “Intangible Cultural Heritage and Living Communities” allows readers to hear community members, Ms. Bertha and Ms. Florence as they share memories and reflections of their community, Nicodemus, KS. Listening to their voices, the reader is able to uniquely experience the history of this community and connect it with the work of the researcher. Jackson emphasizes the role “that the living community plays in cultural heritage preservation” and with the embedded sound clip, readers gain a deeper understanding of this role. Read the full article here.

Hülya Sakarya in, “Complexity of Heritage in Post-Conflict Settings,” shares with readers her fieldwork experience in Tiblisi, Georgia. Through an accompanying video, Sakarya brings readers into her fieldwork experience as she explores the complexity and ambiguity of the reopening of the  Abkhazian House at the Open Air Museum of Ethnography in Tiblisi, two decades since an ethnic conflict with Abkhazian separatists in Georgia. Click here for the full article.

For more in this great series on cultural heritage, check out the In Focus section of Anthropology News. Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels writes on “What is Cultural Heritage?,” Henrike Florusbosch explores the politics and economics of local heritage initiative in Mali and Ghana, Rabia Harmanşah describes doing fieldwork in contested places, such as Cyprus, Michael A Di Giovine and Sarah E Cowie consider, “The Definitional Problem of Patrimony and the Futures of Cultural Heritage,” Maria F Curtis provides analysis of the celebration of Nowruz in Houston, Richard Meyers, Charlotte E Davidson, April Eastman write on “Embracing Cultural Heritage in Higher Education Institutions,” Blaire O Gagnon discusses the use of the phrase “lean back” by an artisan-vendor in Mexico in comparison to Sheryl Sandberg’s promotion of “leaning in,” and Alejandro J Figueroa reflects on “Successful Local Cultural Heritage Management” in Honduras.

 

New Podcast Featuring Robin Nagle

RobinNagle.comListen to Robin Nagle speak about her work in the latest AAA podcast. Dr. Nagle is the author of Picking Up, an ethnography of New York City’s Department of Sanitation.

Dr. Nagle is a clinical associate professor of anthropology and director of the John W. Draper Interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Humanities and Social Thought at New York University. She is also an anthropologist-in-residence with the New York City Department of Sanitation.

 

Know Before You Vote – Resolution on Contingent and Part-Time Academic Labor

A special message from AAA Secretary, Dr. Margaret Buckner:

At the November 2013 business meeting in Chicago, the Committee on Labor Relations submitted a resolution on contingent and part-time academic labor.  Though it was unanimously approved, there wasn’t a quorum at the meeting, so, in accordance with AAA bylaws, the resolution went to the Executive Board.  The EB in turn agreed to place the resolution on this year’s ballot for a vote of the full membership.  This blog is an opportunity for AAA members to speak for or against the resolution before the elections, which open on April 15.

View and leave your comments of the Resolution today. The Resolution will be available for comment until March 31st.

Calling all Discussion Groups and Anthropology Clubs: Let’s Talk About the March Issue of Open Anthropology!

OpenAnthropology728x90_2

Has the new issue of Open Anthropology, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care, piqued your interest in anthropological understandings of health, illness, medicine, and health care? Are you interested in building the conversation on your campus or in your community? Throughout March and April, AAA is encouraging anthropology clubs and discussion groups to explore, debate and analyze contemporary issues of health, illness, medicine and health care based on the material included in the March issue of Open Anthropology.

We’d then like to hear from you! Send us stories, videos, and/or photographs that highlight and illustrate the depth, liveliness and creativity of your discussion. Two submissions will be selected to be featured on the AAA blog in May.

Jump start your conversations using these questions:

  • In what ways does the idea of the “social life of” health, illness, medicine and health care that frames the specific articles in this issue of Open Anthropology, offer a way to shift public conversations on these issues?
  • How can anthropology help identify omissions in policy and public conversations regarding health and health care?
  • In current public conversations and contemporary policy debates on health, illness, medicine and health care, how are inequality and violence engaged with- or ignored? Using these articles, how can anthropologists use ethnography to shed light on inequality and violence?
  • How have these articles intersected with your own research and/or research interests?
  • How are anthropologists across the four fields of anthropology writing about the social life of health, illness, medicine and health care? Beyond the articles presented in this issue of Open Anthropology, what additional research, theories and concepts will help us illuminate our views of health, illness, medicine and  health care?

Please submit your stories and/or photographs to Jennie at jsimpson@aaanet.org by April 30th. We look forward to your submissions!

New Podcast Features Dr. Julienne Rutherford

Listen to the latest podcast, featuring biological anthropologists, Dr. Julienne Rutherford.

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Julienne Rutherford earned her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Indiana University in 2007. She is an assistant professor of Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences and adjunct assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is currently the President of the Midwest Primate Interest Group. She is also the Biological Anthropology Section editor for Anthropology News. She was named a Leadership Fellow by the AAA in 2011, and was the 2013 recipient of the American Society of Primatologists Legacy Award. She was recently named the UIC Researcher of the Year “Rising Star” in the Clinical Sciences.

Rutherford’s research revolves around a central interest in the dynamic maternal environment in which a fetus develops. She is primarily interested in the primate placenta as a signaling interface between mother and fetus. She works with both humans and non-human primates to address questions regarding the effect of maternal ecology (nutrition, life history experience, behavior) on placental morphology, metabolic function, and gene expression and downstream sequelae for offspring health both postnatally and later in life. She has published her multifaceted research in American Anthropologist, Placenta, American Journal of Physical Anthropologists, American Journal of Primatology, American Journal of Human Biology, Obesity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. She recently co-edited the volume Building Babies: Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective. Her research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Society of Primatologists.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 17,225 other followers