• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 20,512 other followers

Webinar Wednesday March 18: Applied Anthropology in the National Parks

As the National Park Service (NPS) approaches its centennial in 2016, the NPS Cultural Anthropology and Archeology Programs continue to engage in research with deep roots in communities across America.By partnering with universities and scholars in the CESU Network (Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units), the NPS funds applied research in ethnography and archeology.This session will introduce current, completed, and upcoming NPS-CESU research; how to submit letters of interest for research through the CESU network; and how students may become involved in applied work in parks.

Keywords: parks; applied; heritage; research; government

Links:
NPS Cultural Anthropology Program: www.nps.gov/ethnography

NPS Archeology Program: www.nps.gov/archeology

Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network: www.cesu.org

Joe Watkins is the Supervisory Cultural Anthropologist and Chief of the NPS Tribal Relations and American Cultures. He oversees the Park Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program, the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, and the Cultural Anthropology Program from the NPS Washington Area Service Office.

Stanley Bond is the Chief Archeologist for the National Park Service and Consulting Archeologist for the Department of the Interior. He has managed a number of CESU projects as a NPS Archeologist, Resource Manager, and Superintendent. Current CESU projects sponsored by the NPS Washington Archeology Program include a Southwest mission travel itinerary, a webinar lecture series, work with Latino high school students, analysis of digital imaging practices, and training for Afghan cultural heritage professionals.

Jennifer Talken-Spaulding is the Regional Cultural Anthropologist for the NPS National Capital Region. She manages multiple applied anthropology projects and a student internship program in support of national park units in three states and the District of Columbia. Research topics include contemporary communities, heritage preservation, and urban subsistence fishing.

Tom Fish is the National Coordinator for the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network. Tom works across government, academia, and the NGO community to facilitate collaborative research, technical assistance, and education/capacity development in support of public trust resource stewardship. Tom’s work covers a wide range of topics relating to land use planning, marine conservation, applied social science and human dimensions, and training for protected area managers in the U.S. and abroad.

Webinar Wednesday: March 4th, 2015 with Mary Butler

March 4th, 2015: Partnering Anthropology and Evaluation:What do we gain? A presentation by Mary Butler

Mary_Butler_website_headshot

 Abstract

This webinar will look at how evaluation and anthropology can be mapped onto each other to create Evaluation Anthropology, an approach to value questions that is stronger than either approach alone for evaluations of programs that are culturally embedded. We will look at how evaluation and anthropology reinforce one another, building methods and theories in Evaluation Anthropology and how our training as anthropologists supports out work as evaluators.

1.What is Evaluation Anthropology and how do we use it?

2.The contribution of evaluation

3.The contribution of evaluation

4.Building Theory: The role of science

5.Building Methods: The role of ethnography

6.Pitfalls: Common problems with client assumptions

7.Evaluation Planning: One way to do it.

8.Mixed Methods: Synthesis of Qualitative and Quantitative Data

9.What qualifies anthropologists to do Evaluation Anthropology

10.What skills do I need to add.

Bio

Mary Odell Butler is an anthropologist-evaluator with 35 years of experience in research design, management, and supervision of evaluations and other research projects and 12 years of university teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels.She has special expertise in program evaluation, evaluation research, and case study methods and have conducted numerous projects for CDC, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and private foundations.

She is employed by Westat as a Senior Analyst supporting work in public health program evaluation.She is retired from twenty years as a Research Leader and Office Director at the Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation.She is an adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland and at the University of North Texas. In this capacity she teaches graduate courses in evaluation.Among her publications is Evaluation: A Culture Systems Approach, in press for release in summer 2015 and Creating Evaluation Anthropology: Introducing and Emerging Sub-Field (NAPA Bulletin 24, 2005)

A Global Celebration of Anthropology

National Anthropology DayOn Thursday, February 19, 2015 anthropologists worldwide will celebrate the inaugural National Anthropology Day. This inaugural event, created by the American Anthropological Association, calls public attention to the important work that anthropologists contribute to our daily lives.

Anthropologists are innovators and creative thinkers who contribute to every sector of society. On National Anthropology Day there will be more than 75 schools, museums and organizations worldwide hosting public events to highlight how anthropologists study, discover and tackle the world’s most pressing issues.

“This grassroots effort is a first for the American Anthropological Association,” said Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow, in a recent statement, “In a time when we hear great skepticism about science in general, and about social science findings in particular, it is important for our members to showcase their contributions.”

AAA Staff

AAA staff celebrate National Anthropology Day

 

Webinar Wednesday returns February 18, 2015 with Elizabeth Briody!

Sometimes Practice Makes Perfect: Cultural Changes in the Training of Anthropologists with Elizabeth Briody

I am proud to announce the American Anthropological Association’s webinar series is returning.  As was the case in 2014, we’ll try and alternate between webinars focused on professional and educational development, and webinars exploring more topical issues.  As part of National Anthropology Day (week?), the event is complimentary, but you will be required to register here. The event will begin at 2 PM EST, and will include a in-depth Q&A session at the end. Be sure to check your system beforehand, so you’ll be ready to go.

Elizabeth Briody_web icon

 Abstract

If you are either a faculty member or a student interested in training related to professional anthropological careers, this webinar is for you!

Interest in anthropological practice has never been higher.Students continue to seek greater job market preparation yet many faculty wonder how to help them.We will talk about:

1.Key differences between “traditional” anthropology programs and applied/practicing-oriented programs

2.Commonalities across high performing applied programs

3.Four distinct models of program effectiveness, highlighting the cultures of the University of Memphis, University of Maryland-College Park, Northern Arizona University, and the University of North Texas

4.If you are a faculty member:How do you build a program with a focus on application and practice?

5.If you are a student:How do you choose a program that will work for you?

Bio

Elizabeth K. Briody, Ph.D. is Founder and Principal of Cultural Keys LLC, a firm that helps companies and nonprofits understand and address organizational and cultural-change issues.  Briody has helped clients in many industries, including those at General Motors where she worked for 24 years.  She is currently a member of the AAA Executive Board and just completed her service as Chair of the AAA Working Group on Mentoring.

For more information on AAA webinars check out our main page: http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/conferences.cfm or email me at conferences@aaanet.org. Check out the webinar here:

Department of Hispanic Studies Trinitiy College Dublin University: Pulling together or Pulling Apart (Call for Papers)

DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC STUDIES
TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY

PULLING TOGETHER OR PULLING APART

IDENTITY AND NATIONHOOD • SPAIN, EUROPE,
THE WEST

25 – 27 June 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

Increasing globalisation highlights the need to revisit the upsurge of Nationalism, and this three-day interdisciplinary conference will provide a forum for debate on sovereignty, nationhood, identity, and interrelated issues in Catalonia, the Basque Country, Galicia, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Belgium, France, Quebec, and elsewhere. Questions will include: why nationalism is so resilient; how notions of ‘self’ and ‘nation’ interpenetrate; economic, human rights, and social justice conflicts; whether and to what extent new definitions and approaches to nationhood and state may be needed in the context of a valid ‘European’ identity in the 21st century.
We invite papers on topics related to the main themes of the conference, to include perspectives on sovereign rights of nations • challenges of micro- and macro-nationalism to the supranational objective of creating a European identity • comparative approaches (historical, media, linguistic, philosophical, gender, anthropological, ethnographic, religious, socio-political…) • cultural rights and public space • radical and moderate nationalisms • territorial, political, and racial constructions of collective national identity • conflict resolution • myth and the nation • the arts in the construction of national identity • narratives of the front lines• forgiveness and reconciliation • other relevant topics.

Proposals (circa 250 words) in English or Spanish, together with a brief biographical note, should reach the conference organizers, Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer and Dr Nicola Rooney (confhisp@tcd.ie), by 12 February 2015. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Proposals from young researchers and postgraduate students are welcome. Acceptances will be notified by 27 March 2015.

For possible publication, revised versions should be sent for peer-review to confhisp@tcd.ie to arrive not later than 15 September 2015.

Further information (registration, accommodation, round-tables, events, etc.) will be available by mid-January on the conference website: http://www.tcd.ie/Hispanic_Studies/PTPA-conference/

A note from the American Anthropological Association: the AAA is not directly connected to the organization, vetting, or implementation of this conference.

New booklet and installation showcase popular anthropology

Today’s guest blog post is by Erin Taylor and Gawain Lynch.

Where are anthropologists publishing these days? Most of us probably know that Gillian Tett writes for The Financial Times and Sarah Kenzidor for Al Jazeera. Paul Stoller has a column in The Huffington Post, and there is also the AAA’s Huffington Post blog. We occasionally stumble across various other articles penned by anthropologists.

A couple of years ago we began searching for anthropology that is written for a public audience. We now have a rather long and impressive list, and we’ve only just uncovered the tip of the iceberg. Around the world, we’ve found anthropologists publishing in places like The Guardian, The Conversation, Nigerians Talk, the Jamaica Gleaner, The Big Issue, O Magazine, Psychology Today, Scientific American, and many more.

But most of use aren’t aware of the extent of popular writing that anthropologists do – not even those of us who do it ourselves. This limits anthropology’s’ potential public voice.

We can change this by learning more about who is doing popular anthropology and by building connections between us.

First, if we share each other’s public work, we help to lift anthropology’s public profile. This helps anthropology have an influential voice in society. It also helps us as individuals: greater visibility for anthropology means that it will be easier to make our own voices heard.

Second, if we know who is writing for the public, we can learn from them. There are many anthropologists who believe that public communication is important and we write regularly on our own blogs. But these have a limited audience, and it’s hard to figure out how to take the next step. We need more avenues for mentorship and learning.

Third, if we network and collaborate as popular writers, we have a stronger bargaining position when it comes to our promotional committees and workplaces, who might not see the value in writing for the public. Most of us who produce popular anthropology do so as individuals. This makes it difficult to convince our workplaces need to understand that contributing to anthropology’s public profile has many benefits. But a show of force can change how popular anthropology is valued.

How do we do this? As a first step, we are running an installation at the AAA meetings in Washington D.C. on Friday 5 December. It will feature short talks by Agustín Fuentes, Rosemary Joyce, and Greg Downey. We’ll show a video of interviews with popular anthropologists, produced by Natalia Reagan from the BOAS network. And you’ll get to participate, too, as the bulk of the installation will be taken up by a Town Hall meeting.

In preparation for our installation, we’re pleased to launch “Showcasing_Popular_Anthropology”(PDF), a compilation of short articles published in newspapers and blogs. It includes contributions from Sarah Kenzidor, Joris Luyendijk, Keith Hart, Dori Tunstall, Susan Blum, Helen Fisher, Vito Laterza, Olimide Abimbola, Agustín Fuentes, Rosemary Joyce, Greg Downey. At the back is a list of further reading to help you learn more about who is doing what and where.

This is just the beginning of the conversation, and taking it further will require a collaborative effort. So, if you will be in Washington D.C., come along and tell us what you think we can do to help popular anthropologists to join forces. If you can’t make it to the AAA meetings, you can still get in contact with the many anthropologists who are doing public work. Communicating among ourselves is an important step on our path to communicating with broader publics.

Practicing, Applied & Public Anthropology: Sessions of Interest

Today’s guest blog post is by the Committee on Practicing, Applied and Public Interest Anthropology (CoPAPIA). NOTE: All rooms are at the Marriott Wardman Park, unless indicated otherwise. Check program for NAPA-sponsored workshops and to confirm times and places of listed sessions.

Wednesday, December 3

Paradox and Resolution in Consumer Research
8 pm—9:45 pm Delaware Suite B

Thursday, December 4

Producing Anthropology and Tourism: Practicing Anthropologists in the Tourism Sector
11 am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 5

Spinning Anthropology in the Anthropocene: Integrating Theoretical & Applied Approaches to Meet the Challenge of Climate Change
Part 1 9am—10:45 am Marriott Balcony B Part 2 2:30 pm—4:15 pm Harding Room

Pathways and Approaches to Practicing Anthropology in Veteran and Military Health Services Research
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Five Fields Update
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Delaware Suite B

Friday, December 5

9th Annual NAPA/AAA Careers Expo: Exploring Professional Careers
11am—4:00 pm Exhibit Hall C

Producing the Anthropology of Policy Across the Discipline
11am—12:45 pm Delaware Suite A (sponsored by CoPAPIA and ASAP)

Public Policy Forum on Indigenous Educational Policy in the U.S.
11am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 2

Producing Health Policy with Anthropology: Case Studies of Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Policy
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite A

Producing Anthropology in Evaluation: Connecting Culture, Equity, Value, and Program Effectiveness
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Marriott Balcony B

“Producing Anthropology” Through Community Engagement
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Honoring J. Anthony Paredes (1939-2013): Ethnologist, Applied Anthropologist, and Friend
2:30pm—4:15 pm Wilson A

The Practice of Anthropology: Consider the Past, Focus on the Future
6:30 pm—8:15 pm Jackson Room

Saturday, December 6

Critical Issues in Anthropology: Constructing Local Practitioner Networks
9 am—10:45 am Washington Room 1 (sponsored by CoPAPIA)

Engaging Anthropology: Experiences from Scandinavia
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall East

Medical Anthropologists in Dept of Veteran Affairs: Our Network, Collaboration, and Methods
9 am—10:45 am Johnson Room

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Life in the Federal Government
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall South

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Private Sector Applications
11 am—12:45 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

NAPA Networking Event: Producing Connections through Conversations
1 pm—2:15 pm Marriott Ballroom Salon 2

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: International Development Opportunities
2:30 pm – 4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 5

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Student Experiences
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 1

Negotiating Public Policy: Actors, Knowledge, and Contested Political Fields
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

But Is It Science? Producing Justice-Oriented Ethnography of Education for Varied Publics
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Palladian Ballroom (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

Sunday, December 7

The Relevance of Anthropology: Using Anthropological Theory & Methods to Address Complex Questions
8 am—9:45 am Taylor Room

Research Methods, Media Campaigns, and Collaboration: Innovative Approaches in Applied Anthropology
10 am—11:45 am Marriott Balcony B

Understanding Community in the [Applied] Anthropological Context
12 pm—1:45 pm Marriott Balcony B

Negotiating Boundaries and Contesting Terrain: Anthropological Knowledge in Legal Settings
12 pm—1:45 pm Virginia Suite B

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,512 other followers