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IV CONGRESS ON LATIN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY – Call for Papers

In addition to the call for panelists on the co-hosted sessions, The IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology’s call for papers is currently open until April 30th. Details and links below are provided by Ricardo A. Fagoga H., Head of the Media Committee for the IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology.
Call for Papers
Deadline: April 30, 2015.
We invite anthropologists and colleagues to present paper proposals at IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología that will take place October 7-10, 2015 in downtown Mexico City.
People interested in presenting a paper can ask to add his proposal to one of the ACCEPTED PANELS (see links below) or they can ask for a complete list writing to: congresoala2015@gmail.com.
To propose a paper, please complete the Paper Participation Form on the webpage of the conference (see link below), where we ask for title, abstract, and name and number of the panel in in which you want to participate, in case your paper is not already accepted in any panel. Also, we ask for personal information: name, institution, academic degree and e-mail. You can also ask for a paper proposal file if you write to congresoala2015@gmail.com.
 
 
Thank you for participating.
Sincerely,
 
Asociación Latinoamericana de Antropología (#ALAmx2015)
Dra. Cristina Oehmichen – Presidenta
Dra. Milka Castro – Vicepresidenta
Dra. Laura Valladares – Secretaria General
Antrop. María Antonieta Gallart – Tesorera
 
IV Congreso Latinoamericano de Antropología
Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
 

 

IV CONGRESS ON LATIN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY – Call for Panel Participants

AAA will be co-hosting two panels at the IV Congress on Latin American Anthropology on October 7-10, 2015 in Mexico City, Mexico.

The panels are:

Public Space Symposium/Simposio “Espacio Público, Herencia Cultural y Resistencia”

This symposium explores a broad range of ethnographic examples of how cultural heritage is contested and represented in the public spaces of Latin America. The examples include both the everyday use of streets and sidewalks and more ritualized and political use of important urban places such as the Zocalo in Mexico City. The papers focus on different formulations of the concepts of “public space” and “cultural heritage” and include imaginary as well as material spaces that resonant with the search for national identity and claims to citizenship. Both the spaces and their cultural meanings are decoded symbolically and practically through their communicative and affective impacts. Many of the paper are also concerned with the ways that class, race and gender figure into the exclusion and inclusion of people in public space and from claiming their role as citizens and dissenters.

Security Abstract

This panel takes up Daniel Goldstein’s (2010) call for a “critical anthropology of security” by focusing on the processes and practices through which fear and the resulting desire for “security” are produced and reproduced within the contexts of different state security regimes. The differences in local responses to violence and crime—or in the US case, the lack of violence and crime—in public spaces and the subsequent retreat of the middle classes to gated and guarded communities form one part of this analysis. But for most middle-class people, seeking security—whether in the context of high or low levels of crime—security takes less obvious configurations. Papers on this panel put forth a variety of compelling approaches to the anthropology of the security, examining the processes and practices of securitization, parenting, neighborhood relationships and activities, and social interactions in public spaces to query how this elusive “good,” that is a sense of security, can be procured in an increasing insecure and violent world. Further, the papers attempt to identify the roles of both the state and public sector institutions, and increase of private institutions and forms of governance in this “security-seeking” endeavor.

For meeting details, submission information and registration, click here.

Webinar Wednesday March 18: Applied Anthropology in the National Parks

As the National Park Service (NPS) approaches its centennial in 2016, the NPS Cultural Anthropology and Archeology Programs continue to engage in research with deep roots in communities across America.By partnering with universities and scholars in the CESU Network (Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units), the NPS funds applied research in ethnography and archeology.This session will introduce current, completed, and upcoming NPS-CESU research; how to submit letters of interest for research through the CESU network; and how students may become involved in applied work in parks.

Keywords: parks; applied; heritage; research; government

Links:
NPS Cultural Anthropology Program: www.nps.gov/ethnography

NPS Archeology Program: www.nps.gov/archeology

Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network: www.cesu.org

Joe Watkins is the Supervisory Cultural Anthropologist and Chief of the NPS Tribal Relations and American Cultures. He oversees the Park Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program, the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, and the Cultural Anthropology Program from the NPS Washington Area Service Office.

Stanley Bond is the Chief Archeologist for the National Park Service and Consulting Archeologist for the Department of the Interior. He has managed a number of CESU projects as a NPS Archeologist, Resource Manager, and Superintendent. Current CESU projects sponsored by the NPS Washington Archeology Program include a Southwest mission travel itinerary, a webinar lecture series, work with Latino high school students, analysis of digital imaging practices, and training for Afghan cultural heritage professionals.

Jennifer Talken-Spaulding is the Regional Cultural Anthropologist for the NPS National Capital Region. She manages multiple applied anthropology projects and a student internship program in support of national park units in three states and the District of Columbia. Research topics include contemporary communities, heritage preservation, and urban subsistence fishing.

Tom Fish is the National Coordinator for the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network. Tom works across government, academia, and the NGO community to facilitate collaborative research, technical assistance, and education/capacity development in support of public trust resource stewardship. Tom’s work covers a wide range of topics relating to land use planning, marine conservation, applied social science and human dimensions, and training for protected area managers in the U.S. and abroad.

Webinar Wednesday: March 4th, 2015 with Mary Butler

March 4th, 2015: Partnering Anthropology and Evaluation:What do we gain? A presentation by Mary Butler

Mary_Butler_website_headshot

 Abstract

This webinar will look at how evaluation and anthropology can be mapped onto each other to create Evaluation Anthropology, an approach to value questions that is stronger than either approach alone for evaluations of programs that are culturally embedded. We will look at how evaluation and anthropology reinforce one another, building methods and theories in Evaluation Anthropology and how our training as anthropologists supports out work as evaluators.

1.What is Evaluation Anthropology and how do we use it?

2.The contribution of evaluation

3.The contribution of evaluation

4.Building Theory: The role of science

5.Building Methods: The role of ethnography

6.Pitfalls: Common problems with client assumptions

7.Evaluation Planning: One way to do it.

8.Mixed Methods: Synthesis of Qualitative and Quantitative Data

9.What qualifies anthropologists to do Evaluation Anthropology

10.What skills do I need to add.

Bio

Mary Odell Butler is an anthropologist-evaluator with 35 years of experience in research design, management, and supervision of evaluations and other research projects and 12 years of university teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels.She has special expertise in program evaluation, evaluation research, and case study methods and have conducted numerous projects for CDC, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and private foundations.

She is employed by Westat as a Senior Analyst supporting work in public health program evaluation.She is retired from twenty years as a Research Leader and Office Director at the Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation.She is an adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland and at the University of North Texas. In this capacity she teaches graduate courses in evaluation.Among her publications is Evaluation: A Culture Systems Approach, in press for release in summer 2015 and Creating Evaluation Anthropology: Introducing and Emerging Sub-Field (NAPA Bulletin 24, 2005)

A Global Celebration of Anthropology

National Anthropology DayOn Thursday, February 19, 2015 anthropologists worldwide will celebrate the inaugural National Anthropology Day. This inaugural event, created by the American Anthropological Association, calls public attention to the important work that anthropologists contribute to our daily lives.

Anthropologists are innovators and creative thinkers who contribute to every sector of society. On National Anthropology Day there will be more than 75 schools, museums and organizations worldwide hosting public events to highlight how anthropologists study, discover and tackle the world’s most pressing issues.

“This grassroots effort is a first for the American Anthropological Association,” said Executive Director, Dr. Edward Liebow, in a recent statement, “In a time when we hear great skepticism about science in general, and about social science findings in particular, it is important for our members to showcase their contributions.”

AAA Staff

AAA staff celebrate National Anthropology Day

 

Webinar Wednesday returns February 18, 2015 with Elizabeth Briody!

Sometimes Practice Makes Perfect: Cultural Changes in the Training of Anthropologists with Elizabeth Briody

I am proud to announce the American Anthropological Association’s webinar series is returning.  As was the case in 2014, we’ll try and alternate between webinars focused on professional and educational development, and webinars exploring more topical issues.  As part of National Anthropology Day (week?), the event is complimentary, but you will be required to register here. The event will begin at 2 PM EST, and will include a in-depth Q&A session at the end. Be sure to check your system beforehand, so you’ll be ready to go.

Elizabeth Briody_web icon

 Abstract

If you are either a faculty member or a student interested in training related to professional anthropological careers, this webinar is for you!

Interest in anthropological practice has never been higher.Students continue to seek greater job market preparation yet many faculty wonder how to help them.We will talk about:

1.Key differences between “traditional” anthropology programs and applied/practicing-oriented programs

2.Commonalities across high performing applied programs

3.Four distinct models of program effectiveness, highlighting the cultures of the University of Memphis, University of Maryland-College Park, Northern Arizona University, and the University of North Texas

4.If you are a faculty member:How do you build a program with a focus on application and practice?

5.If you are a student:How do you choose a program that will work for you?

Bio

Elizabeth K. Briody, Ph.D. is Founder and Principal of Cultural Keys LLC, a firm that helps companies and nonprofits understand and address organizational and cultural-change issues.  Briody has helped clients in many industries, including those at General Motors where she worked for 24 years.  She is currently a member of the AAA Executive Board and just completed her service as Chair of the AAA Working Group on Mentoring.

For more information on AAA webinars check out our main page: http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/conferences.cfm or email me at conferences@aaanet.org. Check out the webinar here:

Department of Hispanic Studies Trinitiy College Dublin University: Pulling together or Pulling Apart (Call for Papers)

DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC STUDIES
TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY

PULLING TOGETHER OR PULLING APART

IDENTITY AND NATIONHOOD • SPAIN, EUROPE,
THE WEST

25 – 27 June 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

Increasing globalisation highlights the need to revisit the upsurge of Nationalism, and this three-day interdisciplinary conference will provide a forum for debate on sovereignty, nationhood, identity, and interrelated issues in Catalonia, the Basque Country, Galicia, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Belgium, France, Quebec, and elsewhere. Questions will include: why nationalism is so resilient; how notions of ‘self’ and ‘nation’ interpenetrate; economic, human rights, and social justice conflicts; whether and to what extent new definitions and approaches to nationhood and state may be needed in the context of a valid ‘European’ identity in the 21st century.
We invite papers on topics related to the main themes of the conference, to include perspectives on sovereign rights of nations • challenges of micro- and macro-nationalism to the supranational objective of creating a European identity • comparative approaches (historical, media, linguistic, philosophical, gender, anthropological, ethnographic, religious, socio-political…) • cultural rights and public space • radical and moderate nationalisms • territorial, political, and racial constructions of collective national identity • conflict resolution • myth and the nation • the arts in the construction of national identity • narratives of the front lines• forgiveness and reconciliation • other relevant topics.

Proposals (circa 250 words) in English or Spanish, together with a brief biographical note, should reach the conference organizers, Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer and Dr Nicola Rooney (confhisp@tcd.ie), by 12 February 2015. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Proposals from young researchers and postgraduate students are welcome. Acceptances will be notified by 27 March 2015.

For possible publication, revised versions should be sent for peer-review to confhisp@tcd.ie to arrive not later than 15 September 2015.

Further information (registration, accommodation, round-tables, events, etc.) will be available by mid-January on the conference website: http://www.tcd.ie/Hispanic_Studies/PTPA-conference/

A note from the American Anthropological Association: the AAA is not directly connected to the organization, vetting, or implementation of this conference.

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