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New Podcast Features Dr. Julienne Rutherford

Listen to the latest podcast, featuring biological anthropologists, Dr. Julienne Rutherford.

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Julienne Rutherford earned her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Indiana University in 2007. She is an assistant professor of Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences and adjunct assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is currently the President of the Midwest Primate Interest Group. She is also the Biological Anthropology Section editor for Anthropology News. She was named a Leadership Fellow by the AAA in 2011, and was the 2013 recipient of the American Society of Primatologists Legacy Award. She was recently named the UIC Researcher of the Year “Rising Star” in the Clinical Sciences.

Rutherford’s research revolves around a central interest in the dynamic maternal environment in which a fetus develops. She is primarily interested in the primate placenta as a signaling interface between mother and fetus. She works with both humans and non-human primates to address questions regarding the effect of maternal ecology (nutrition, life history experience, behavior) on placental morphology, metabolic function, and gene expression and downstream sequelae for offspring health both postnatally and later in life. She has published her multifaceted research in American Anthropologist, Placenta, American Journal of Physical Anthropologists, American Journal of Primatology, American Journal of Human Biology, Obesity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. She recently co-edited the volume Building Babies: Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective. Her research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Society of Primatologists.

New Podcast Features Dr. Kristen Ghodsee

ghodsee head shotListen to the latest podcast, featuring Anthropology News contributing editor, Dr. Kristen Ghodsee (Bowdoin College).

Kristen Ghodsee earned her Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley and is the Director and John S. Osterweis Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at Bowdoin College.  She is currently the President-elect of the Society for Humanistic Anthropology.  She is the author of The Red Riviera: Gender, Tourism and Postsocialism on the Black Sea (Duke University Press, 2005), Muslim Lives in Eastern Europe: Gender, Ethnicity and the Transformation of Islam in Postsocialist Bulgaria (Princeton University Press, 2009), Lost In Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Socialism (Duke University Press, 2011), and numerous articles on gender, nostalgia, and Eastern Europe.  She is also the co-author of Professor Mommy: Finding Work/Family Balance in Academia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011).  Her fifth book, The Left Side of History: Communism, Idealism and Remembering World War II, is forthcoming with Duke University Press in 2015.

Ghodsee is the recipient of fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright, NCEEER, IREX and ACLS, and has been awarded internationally competitive residential research fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC; the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey; the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Study (FRIAS) in Germany.  

In 2012, she was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in Anthropology and Cultural Studies.  

November is Native American Heritage Month

Today’s guest blog post is by AAA Member, Guven Peter Witteveen.

We Still Live here

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, PBS will stream We Still Live Here for free throughout November. The film is especially relevant now, as it features members of the Wampanoag Tribes of Massachusetts, descendants of the people we celebrate every Thanksgiving for the help they gave the “Pilgrims.” We Still Live Here tells the near miraculous story of present-day Wampanoags reclaiming their language and rediscovering their culture. Click here to stream for free at PBS.org, or buy the DVD on their site Here.

Eye-opening anthropology

AAA debuts new video abstracts. Teresa Figueroa Sanchez comments on her Anthropology of Work Review article about “California Strawberries” and R. Brian Ferguson talks about his work, “Blood of the Leviathan.” The latter (originally published in American Ethnologist) is part of a collection “On Violence” in Open Anthropology. So, what can video abstractsdo that the written word does not? These short takes let authors personally explain their work. As visual documents, they provide a way for non-specialists to quickly understand the central themes. Students might well find these clips fascinating in terms of making research projects “real,” by showing how these anthropologists came to their projects and how anthropologists craft their research. I hope you’ll watch these productions, tell us what you think, and enjoy these efforts to open up anthropology.

Online Open Forums on Revised Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

ACRLThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) invites you to attend one of their free online open forums to learn more about the work of their task force appointed to oversee substantial revisions to the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education that will be completed by June 2014. The Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education, first adopted in 2000, have defined information literacy for librarians, educators, and assessment agencies. The task force is working on a new approach that underscores the critical need for faculty members and librarians to collaborate to effectively address information literacy education that aligns with disciplinary content. While the exact approach is still under discussion, two new elements will be incorporated: threshold concepts and metaliteracy. These two foundational elements should provide the basis for more sustained collaborations with disciplinary faculty and create more aligned teaching and learning communities at the institutional level.

During the online open forum you will learn about the direction the task force is taking with the revisions, the composition of the group, and opportunities for you to provide feedback or ask questions about the process. Due to limited space we ask you to attend as a group under one registration. We encourage you to include stakeholders from across campus including but not limited to librarians, faculty, provosts, academic support services, general education curriculum committees, and members of accrediting agencies.

 

There is no charge to participate in an online open forum and each lasts one hour. Online open forums will be held:

         Thursday, October 17, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

         Tuesday, October 29, 8am Pacific/9am Mountain/10am Central/11am Eastern

         Monday, November 4, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

Sign up is limited to 300 logins for each event, first-come first-served. Register now! Links to the recorded online open forums will be posted afterwards on the website.

Have You Met Donna A. Auston?

Donna A. Auston

Meet Donna. She is the third anthropologist to be interviewed in AAA’s newest podcast series – Anthropologists in the Field.

Donna A. Auston is a graduate student in the cultural anthropology program at Rutgers University. She is conducting preliminary research on Muslim communities in the San Francisco Bay area. While there, she is studying local Muslim institutions, including the first Muslim liberal arts college in the United States. She is also studying the activities artists, activists, and intellectuals from the local Muslim community. Her current field work is concerned with the intersection of race, religious practice, and the production of American Muslim identity, which will serve as a prelude to and preparation for a longer field study in the future.

Click here to hear about Donna’s work.

Mark Your Calendar! Seminario Virtual: an international collaborative pilot project

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) teams up with anthropological associations around the world to host an international pilot project – Seminario Virtual.

AAA, in collaboration with the European Association of Social Anthropologists/Association européenne des anthropologues sociaux (EASA), Associação Brasileira de Antropologia (ABA) and Canadian Anthropology Society/Société canadienne d’anthropologie (CASCA), creates a virtual seminar aimed to explore the centrality of language in production of anthropological knowledge and its political aspects. For theme and format details, visit the Seminario Virtual tab in the header of the AAA blog. Stay tuned for participation information.

 

Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things – Tara Waters Lumpkin

This latest podcast installment of Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things and guest blog post features AAA member, Tara Waters Lumpkin. Tara is the Executive Director of the non-profit Izilwane. She founded Izilwane to explore, with the help of others, how human beings can shift their perceptions so as to learn to co-exist with other species and nature. In addition, she is an environmental and medical anthropologist who has worked as an international development consultant for UNICEF, the United States Agency for International Development, and a variety of nongovernmental organizations. Prior to international aid work, she was an environmental journalist and professor of writing and media, and has published poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, as well as having won more than half a dozen writing prizes,fellowships, and grants. At this time, she is writing a creative nonfiction book and is at work on an eco-memoir.

NEW PODCAST! Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things – Tara Waters Lumpkin – Listen Now

IZILWANE, which means “animals” in Zulu, is a cutting-edge multi-media platform, or e-zine, that takes an anthropological approach to biodiversity loss. As you may know, our planet is losing approximately 30,000 species each year or three species every hour. IZILWANE’s goal is to raise awareness about this biodiversity crisis and create a new ecological paradigm based on enhancing the relationship of human beings with other species and the natural world.

To this end, IZILWANE publishes articles that take our readers on journeys around the globe and into the human psyche to explore why humans are causing biodiversity loss and harming the environment, and, most importantly, what we can do to stop this pattern. The IZILWANE project believes that we will change our destructive human behaviors when we are able to feel closer to other species and nature, that feeling is as important as facts in creating awareness and behavior change. This is why we have chosen storytelling to enact a positive change in our human perception of our relation with nature and other species.  Our tag line is: IZILWANE—connecting the human animal to the global ecosystem.

To this end, our entirely volunteer team of editors trains individuals, including youth, from around the globe to be citizen eco-reporters who tell their own stories about our theme through writing, photography, and video. In addition, our all-volunteer core management team trains our younger support team in non-profit management skills in areas such as outreach, development, social media, and more. By working together, the entire team of editors, global citizen eco-reporters, and non-profit managers become biodiversity advocates who co-create eco-centric models of thinking, living and being, and share their knowledge and experiences with each other and the general public.

Our e-zine is at: www.Izilwane.org. We publish articles, photo and video essays, our own blog, and are blogging for National Geographic’s News Watch. In addition, we share content with Ecology.com. We operate virtually and our team members are in the U.S.A, Britain, Belgium, and Rwanda, to name a few locations. Valuing our volunteers time at $35/hr, we have logged over half a million dollars in volunteer time since the birth of our project in 2009.

We work primarily with students at the undergraduate and graduate level. These are the people who become our global citizen eco-reporters, our editors, and our non-profit management support team. Many students work in multiple departments of our team, writing, editing, and doing some management. Have a look at our our team, our contributors and our past volunteers.

Listen to the Podcast

New Podcast! Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things – Matt Piscitelli

Listen to the new podcast in the series Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things featuring AAA member, Matthew Piscitelli. Matthew has gotten creative with funding his next project.


Through my years of work as an archaeologist, I’ve always been amazed whenever I can hold something in my hand that no one has touched in the last 5,000 years.  Well, now I am asking your help to provide more such opportunities, and in the process, help preserve part of our global heritage.

I am currently applying for funding to support my archaeological dig in Peru this summer.  The results of the project will form the basis of my Ph.D. dissertation and eventually help me accomplish my goal of becoming a university professor.  I have had some success already applying to the National Geographic, my university (University of Illinois-Chicago), as well as my place of employment (The Field Museum).  I also have applications pending through the National Science Foundation and Wenner-Gren Foundation.

During this process of application, however, I had an idea that definitely falls outside of the box.  In general, scientific projects in any field are funded through the government, private organizations or through a network of wealthy donors that are somehow already connected to those scientists.  The general public hardly ever hears of these projects, let alone gets the opportunity to support these important scientific endeavors.  With the popularity of social networking, a recently developed fundraising tactic known as “crowdfunding” is beginning to be used to back small-scale inventions, innovators, entrepreneurs, etc.  So I thought, “why can’t that work for scientific projects like my own?”

I have signed up through Peerbackers, a well-known and trusted website (Google it) in order to test run this strategy.  I ask you all to check out my project, offer words of encouragement, contribute (always well-appreciated), and most importantly, spread the word.  Please Tweet, post a link to my project on Facebook, forward this post to friends and family, etc.  Don’t hesitate to respond with questions and comments.  As with any Ph.D. student, I would be more than happy to talk to you about my research!

Are you interested in sharing your extraordinary in an upcoming podcast? Click here to learn how.

New Podcast Series – Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things

An interview with Dr. Laurian Bowles kicks off AAA’ s latest podcast series Ordinary Anthropologists Doing Extraordinary Things.

Dr. Bowles is Assistant Professor at Western Illinois University, where she specializes in gender and power, migration and Africa, and black youth culture. Known by her students as Dr. Laurian, she engages them in current anthropological dialogue via their class Twitter account @anthro110.

Listen to the interview with Dr. Bowles.

Do you want to be the next Ordinary Anthropologist Doing Extraordinary Things? Visit AAA’s podcast page for details.

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