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New Podcast Features Barbara Clark

B.ClarkListen to Barbara Clark in our newest podcast speak about her research in aviation discourse and safety. Dr. Clark is a visiting research fellow at the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, Queen Mary, University of London. During a career in aviation as a flight attendant, Dr. Clark was inspired to join her passions for the aviation community and that of language and linguistics. She return to graduate school to earn a Masters and PhD in Linguistics from Queen Mary, University of London.

Learn about Dr. Clark’s research as she explores the communications of the aviation community and its impact on operations and safety as well as creation of sociocultural sub-communities.

 

 

New Podcast Features Dr. Julienne Rutherford

Listen to the latest podcast, featuring biological anthropologists, Dr. Julienne Rutherford.

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Julienne Rutherford earned her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Indiana University in 2007. She is an assistant professor of Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences and adjunct assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is currently the President of the Midwest Primate Interest Group. She is also the Biological Anthropology Section editor for Anthropology News. She was named a Leadership Fellow by the AAA in 2011, and was the 2013 recipient of the American Society of Primatologists Legacy Award. She was recently named the UIC Researcher of the Year “Rising Star” in the Clinical Sciences.

Rutherford’s research revolves around a central interest in the dynamic maternal environment in which a fetus develops. She is primarily interested in the primate placenta as a signaling interface between mother and fetus. She works with both humans and non-human primates to address questions regarding the effect of maternal ecology (nutrition, life history experience, behavior) on placental morphology, metabolic function, and gene expression and downstream sequelae for offspring health both postnatally and later in life. She has published her multifaceted research in American Anthropologist, Placenta, American Journal of Physical Anthropologists, American Journal of Primatology, American Journal of Human Biology, Obesity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. She recently co-edited the volume Building Babies: Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective. Her research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Society of Primatologists.

New Podcast Features Dr. Kristen Ghodsee

ghodsee head shotListen to the latest podcast, featuring Anthropology News contributing editor, Dr. Kristen Ghodsee (Bowdoin College).

Kristen Ghodsee earned her Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley and is the Director and John S. Osterweis Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at Bowdoin College.  She is currently the President-elect of the Society for Humanistic Anthropology.  She is the author of The Red Riviera: Gender, Tourism and Postsocialism on the Black Sea (Duke University Press, 2005), Muslim Lives in Eastern Europe: Gender, Ethnicity and the Transformation of Islam in Postsocialist Bulgaria (Princeton University Press, 2009), Lost In Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Socialism (Duke University Press, 2011), and numerous articles on gender, nostalgia, and Eastern Europe.  She is also the co-author of Professor Mommy: Finding Work/Family Balance in Academia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011).  Her fifth book, The Left Side of History: Communism, Idealism and Remembering World War II, is forthcoming with Duke University Press in 2015.

Ghodsee is the recipient of fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright, NCEEER, IREX and ACLS, and has been awarded internationally competitive residential research fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC; the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey; the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Study (FRIAS) in Germany.  

In 2012, she was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in Anthropology and Cultural Studies.  

November is Native American Heritage Month

Today’s guest blog post is by AAA Member, Guven Peter Witteveen.

We Still Live here

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, PBS will stream We Still Live Here for free throughout November. The film is especially relevant now, as it features members of the Wampanoag Tribes of Massachusetts, descendants of the people we celebrate every Thanksgiving for the help they gave the “Pilgrims.” We Still Live Here tells the near miraculous story of present-day Wampanoags reclaiming their language and rediscovering their culture. Click here to stream for free at PBS.org, or buy the DVD on their site Here.

Eye-opening anthropology

AAA debuts new video abstracts. Teresa Figueroa Sanchez comments on her Anthropology of Work Review article about “California Strawberries” and R. Brian Ferguson talks about his work, “Blood of the Leviathan.” The latter (originally published in American Ethnologist) is part of a collection “On Violence” in Open Anthropology. So, what can video abstractsdo that the written word does not? These short takes let authors personally explain their work. As visual documents, they provide a way for non-specialists to quickly understand the central themes. Students might well find these clips fascinating in terms of making research projects “real,” by showing how these anthropologists came to their projects and how anthropologists craft their research. I hope you’ll watch these productions, tell us what you think, and enjoy these efforts to open up anthropology.

Online Open Forums on Revised Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

ACRLThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) invites you to attend one of their free online open forums to learn more about the work of their task force appointed to oversee substantial revisions to the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education that will be completed by June 2014. The Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education, first adopted in 2000, have defined information literacy for librarians, educators, and assessment agencies. The task force is working on a new approach that underscores the critical need for faculty members and librarians to collaborate to effectively address information literacy education that aligns with disciplinary content. While the exact approach is still under discussion, two new elements will be incorporated: threshold concepts and metaliteracy. These two foundational elements should provide the basis for more sustained collaborations with disciplinary faculty and create more aligned teaching and learning communities at the institutional level.

During the online open forum you will learn about the direction the task force is taking with the revisions, the composition of the group, and opportunities for you to provide feedback or ask questions about the process. Due to limited space we ask you to attend as a group under one registration. We encourage you to include stakeholders from across campus including but not limited to librarians, faculty, provosts, academic support services, general education curriculum committees, and members of accrediting agencies.

 

There is no charge to participate in an online open forum and each lasts one hour. Online open forums will be held:

         Thursday, October 17, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

         Tuesday, October 29, 8am Pacific/9am Mountain/10am Central/11am Eastern

         Monday, November 4, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

Sign up is limited to 300 logins for each event, first-come first-served. Register now! Links to the recorded online open forums will be posted afterwards on the website.

Have You Met Donna A. Auston?

Donna A. Auston

Meet Donna. She is the third anthropologist to be interviewed in AAA’s newest podcast series – Anthropologists in the Field.

Donna A. Auston is a graduate student in the cultural anthropology program at Rutgers University. She is conducting preliminary research on Muslim communities in the San Francisco Bay area. While there, she is studying local Muslim institutions, including the first Muslim liberal arts college in the United States. She is also studying the activities artists, activists, and intellectuals from the local Muslim community. Her current field work is concerned with the intersection of race, religious practice, and the production of American Muslim identity, which will serve as a prelude to and preparation for a longer field study in the future.

Click here to hear about Donna’s work.

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