• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 20,598 other followers

Webinar Wednesday with Larissa Sandy: Sex Work in Cambodia

Hello anthropology enthusiasts!  Our next webinar, with Larissa Sandy, will be the last scheduled before we take a break for the summer.  In it we’ll be exploring the struggles and livelihood of sex work in Cambodia. Before we get into Larissa’s incredible work, I’d like to take a moment to thank you all for an amazing first year of webinars.  What started out as a side project– and a chance for me to talk with some of my anthropology heroes– has evolved into a vibrant experience, and it always makes me smile to see folks tuning in to our twice a month journey into anthropology. Life can be hectic, and I appreciate that you all chose to spend your time with us. We have a great schedule for the fall leading up to the Annual Meeting in Denver this year, but for now let’s dive into Larissa’s webinar:

lsandyIt is very difficult for many people to understand sex work in Cambodia in terms other than trafficking, and so this webinar attempts to challenge and transform conventional thought and theory about sex work in non-Western modern settings like Cambodia.

In the webinar, I explore women’s pathways into sex work and highlight how this often begins with a series of constraints and choices that cannot be disconnected and which renders their identification as victims of trafficking or free agents highly problematic. The webinar shifts the focus of debate from very simplistic dichotomies by concentrating on descriptions of women’s lives rather than beginning with a priori assumptions (e.g. sex workers as victims enslaved in prostitution). I consider some of the difficulties surrounding the intersection of structural factors with subjective choices in sex workers’ everyday lives and analyse how Cambodia’s transitional economy and development plans shape sex working women’s trajectories into and experiences of sex work, and debt bondage in particular.

By exploring sex work through an anthropological lens, the webinar examines women’s involvement in the sector as part of the moral and political economies of sex work. It also discusses how sex work can be understood as a rational economic choice and a vehicle through which important social and cultural obligations fulfilled as well as reflecting on the pressing need to critically re-think the trafficking/sex slavery label.

Bio: Larissa Sandy is an anthropologist at RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia) where she lectures in the Criminology program. Her research examines sex work and women’s agency; contract labour, debt bondage and other forms of unfree labour in sex work; sex worker activism; and the global politics of sex work regulation. Before joining RMIT University, Larissa was a Vice Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in Criminology at Flinders University, where her research explored the effects of human trafficking laws and interventions for male and female sex workers in Cambodia. She is author of Women and Sex Work in Cambodia: Blood, Sweat and Tears (Routledge).

Bring your questions and curiosity, and don’t forget to register beforehand! The webinar begins 2 PM Eastern Time on May 20th, looking forward to seeing you there!

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs

Hope you all enjoyed your webinar hiatus (and Call for Papers period) because we’ve got two more amazing webinars coming your way before we break for the summer! The first, which will occur on May 6th, is hosted by Dr. Kenda R. Stewart, Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger, and Dr. David A. Katz. The second will be hosted by Dr. Larissa Sandy and will go live May 20th and will be focusing on Sex Work in Cambodia.  Both registrations are active and the password will be anthro when it’s time to join.  Larissa deserves her own blog post, so check back for that later next week.  For now, here’s a little preview of what’s coming your way May 6th:

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Kenda R. Stewart, PhD, David A. Katz, MD, MSc, and Heather Schacht Reisinger, PhD

In recent years the number of anthropologists employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs has exploded. In October 2013, Dr. David Atkins, the Director of VA’s Health Services Research & Development affirmed anthropologists’ contribution to health services research teams because of their expertise in understanding how culture can facilitate or impede efforts to improve health care. Using a mixed-methods smoking cessation study as an example, this webinar will explore the incorporation of anthropological methods and insights into the institutional and research structure of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Anthropologist Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger will provide an historical overview of the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE)’s Qualitative Core, housed at the Iowa City VA. Dr. Kenda Stewart, also an anthropologist, will discuss her role in conducting qualitative research on a smoking cessation intervention in collaboration with quantitative researcher, Dr. David Katz, MD, who will share his experience working with anthropologists and the advantages and challenges of incorporating anthropological methods into health services research.

Presenter bios:

Dr. Kenda R. Stewart is an anthropologist and qualitative analyst for the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE), the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center-Central Region, and the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) Demonstration Lab located in Iowa City, IA. Currently, she is involved in multiple VA studies on topics including evaluating telehealth modalities for rural Veterans with HIV, chronic pain management, smoking cessation, primary care teams, Veteran outreach, and infertility in Veterans.

Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger is an anthropologist and Investigator at CADRE and an Assistant Professor in the General Internal Medicine Division in the Department of Internal Medicine at University of Iowa. Currently, she is the Principle Investigator on two VA HSR&D-funded projects and has led qualitative components on several multi-site VA and non-VA studies on topics including substance abuse treatment, hypertension, MI and ACS, ICU telemedicine, and infection control.

Dr. David A. Katz is a Core Investigator in (CADRE) Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City.  He has expertise in conducting practice-based intervention research, and has an ongoing interest in the dynamics of changing clinician behavior.  He has collaborated closely with qualitative investigators in VA and NIH-funded implementation trials of smoking cessation guidelines in inpatient and outpatient practice settings.  Dr. Katz co-directs the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team Demonstration Laboratory, which is conducting an ongoing assessment of the patient-centered medical home initiative within the Veterans Health Administration.

As per usual, the webinar will begin at 2 PM Eastern Time. Please register here beforehand and don’t forget the password is ‘anthro’

Bring your questions and curiosity this is going to be a great one!

AAA Appoints Jeff Martin as New Director of Communications and Public Affairs

MartinJeff_325The American Anthropological Association (AAA) has appointed Jeff Martin, a communications veteran with more than 25 years experience in the field, as the Association’s new director, communications and public affairs. Martin will be responsible for directing the Association’s media outreach, public education, and government relations programs.

“Jeff Martin brings a wealth of public relations experience to the table,” said AAA Executive Director Ed Liebow. “The knowledge he has gained working for the non-profit, private, and government sectors as well as community-based groups give him a distinct perspective on the nuances of communicating across our broad spectrum of diverse members and sister organizations. His extensive travel and cross-cultural skills acquired living overseas, from the South Pacific to the Caribbean, will also add a great deal of value to our organization and anthropology as we face global challenges that require collaborative solutions.”

Before joining AAA, Martin has served in public relations capacities for the Council on Foundations, The Nature Conservancy, and Peace Corps. He has also worked with international firms including Bozell, Kenyon & Eckhardt, and Edelman Public Relations Worldwide.

A graduate from Arizona State University, he worked as a journalist before going into public affairs and has won awards from the Public Relations Society of America and the New Jersey Press Association. He also has had articles featured in several publications, including Travel & Leisure, Cineaste, American Cowboy, and the Denver Post.

 

CONTACT:

Jeff Martin
Director, Communications and Public Affairs
571-483-1163
Mobile: 240-393-1149
jmartin@aaanet.org

Joslyn Osten,
Marketing and Public Relations Manager,
703-528-1902 x 1171
Mobile: 571-581-8262
josten@aaanet.org

– – AAA – –

The American Anthropological Association, dedicated to advancing human understanding and addressing the world’s most pressing problems since its founding in 1902, is the world’s largest professional anthropology organization.

AAA Statement on Police Practices

AAA President Monica Heller releases public statement on police practices in the United States and calls upon anthropologists to help create equitable policing:

In the United States, too many black Americans are killed by officers of the law. As anthropologists, we must speak out whenever our common humanity gives way to discrimination, prejudice and violence. We must speak out whenever anyone acts in ways that accords the full rights of personhood to some but not all. In this case, these injustices are perpetrated by those who are trained to protect us all, requiring a radical re-examination of the processes and structures that produce these tragedies on a regular basis.

Anthropologists can, and do, contribute to this re-examination by showing how structural inequality makes racism and race-based violence commonplace, whether it is motivated by individuals’ conscious intent or not, and in particular how officers of the law come to perpetrate such violence. It is time now to join with others to undo that process. Because it stops today.

Taking Action to Preserve Heritage Sites in Mosul

The American Anthropological Association’s  Cultural Heritage Task Force writes to U.S. Secretary of State encouraging the United States to take action in preserving the cultural heritage sites in Mosul, Iraq. Below is a preview, read the entire letter (PDF).Secretary Kerry RE.Mosul

AAA President Defends Social Science Research at NSF

Dear AAA Members:

For those of you concerned about NSF funding for anthropological research, I want to bring to your attention a legislative proposal currently making its way through the US Congress that would, if enacted, have serious consequences for anthropological research in the United States.

The Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology, or FIRST Act, was introduced two weeks ago by Representative Larry Buschon (R-IN) the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Research of the larger House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. We believe the legislation is a misguided attempt to re-authorize the National Science Foundation (NSF), as it significantly cuts funding to the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE), which is primarily responsible for funding anthropological research.

If this legislation were enacted, for the first time, Congress would set funding targets for each individual directorate instead of funding NSF as a whole and allowing the agency to allocate funds internally. All directorates would receive an increase EXCEPT SBE, Geosciences, and International and Integrative Activities (IIA). SBE’s budget would be reduced from $267 million it received in fiscal year 2014 to about $200 million in fiscal year 2015.

NSF’s overall budget authority is about $7 billion, one of the larger public sources of funding for researchers in the US. While the SBE budget represents a relatively small share of that total, almost two-thirds of all publicly funded social science research comes from the NSF. We certainly agree that federal operations must be mindful of current fiscal conditions, but we believe it is ill-advised to leave it up to a partisan Congress to determine which categories of science funding should be increased and which should be cut.

The AAA Executive Director and the Public Affairs staff have been closely following this issue, meeting with Congressional representatives, working with coalitions (such as the Consortium of Social Science Associations, the Coalition for National Science Funding and the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences) to increase overall funding for the NSF, and funding for the SBE. AAA staff have prepared a useful summary of the issues in the legislation on the AAA blog, which includes ways you can support the AAA. Staff have written columns for the Huffington Post and for the Chronicle for Higher Education.

In the coming weeks, the entire House Committee on Science, Space and Technology will vote on the FIRST Act. If it passes in this Committee, and then the full House of Representatives, it will be up for Senate consideration. Please know that your Association is hard at work protecting the interests of researchers and their research. We thank you for your support. For those of you based in the US, we encourage you to let your Congressional representatives know how you feel about the importance of public investments in social science research.

Monica Heller

AAA President

New Podcast Featuring Robin Nagle

RobinNagle.comListen to Robin Nagle speak about her work in the latest AAA podcast. Dr. Nagle is the author of Picking Up, an ethnography of New York City’s Department of Sanitation.

Dr. Nagle is a clinical associate professor of anthropology and director of the John W. Draper Interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Humanities and Social Thought at New York University. She is also an anthropologist-in-residence with the New York City Department of Sanitation.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,598 other followers