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AAA 2014 Annual Photo Contest Voting Period Ending Tonight

Hello all! The photo contest voting period is coming to an end tonight at midnight (Eastern Time). Get your votes in now.  We will than proceed to the staff voting and production phase to produce the calendar.

If you do not wish to use Facebook for voting, please email photos@aaanet.org, no votes will be counted which have been submitted after midnight (Eastern Time) tonight.

I want to thank all the amazing photographers who have submitted this year.  We got more submission and votes this year than any previous year, each provoking and imaginative.  Thanks to your votes we will be narrowing down the photographs until we have 12 for our calendar (Ideally 4 from each of the categories). Then we will be producing the calendar, which will be given out at the annual meeting, or by request after the annual meeting.

If you are one of the photographers selected for the calendar, please email photos@aaanet.org, so we can send you the desired number of calendars.  There is a limited amount being produced this year, so please request early!

New to Medical Anthropology Quarterly: Accepted Articles

Medical Anthropology Quarterly and Wiley Blackwell are pleased to announce the launch of “Accepted Articles.” This innovative feature allows accepted articles to be published online prior to the printed issue and aids in the widespread impact of new research. Final edited and typeset versions of record will appear in future issues of Medical Anthropology Quarterly.

“Accepted Articles” is currently available through the Wiley Online Library. For AnthroSource users, “Accepted Articles” can be accessed by clicking on the “HTML Version and More Information” button. The feature will be available directly on AnthroSource after the platform relaunches in spring 2015. Current “Accepted Articles” feature:

Neoliberal Justice and the Transformation of the Moral: The Privatization of the Right to Health Care in Colombia
César Ernesto Abadía-Barrero

“I Don’t Know the Words He Uses”: Therapeutic Communication among Q’eqchi Maya Healers and Their Patients
James B. Waldram

Insurance Accounts: The Cultural Logics of Health Care Financing
Jessica Mulligan

Is There a Role for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Preventive and Promotive Health? An Anthropological Assessment in the Context of U.S. Health Reform
Jennifer Jo Thompson and Mark Nichter

Communicating “Evidence”: Lifestyle, Cancer and the Promise of a Disease-free Future
Kirsten Bell and Svetlana Ristovski-Slijepcevic

Login to the Wiley Online Library or AnthroSource to access Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Users can then access “Accepted Articles.”

New Issue of Open Anthropology

Open Anthropology

Open Anthropology, a digital-only publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its latest issue. In World on the Move: Migration Stories, editor Alisse Waterston (CUNY – John Jay College of Criminal Justice) offers thirteen articles and two book reviews of anthropological works on the movement and circulation of people, ideas, languages and objects, and the human stories that reveal these processes. This issue also sheds light on current humanitarian crises and legislative debates related to migration.

Waterston curates a set of articles that explore the social and cultural aspects of migration across the globe and over time. “In the midst of contentious debates about immigrants and immigration law, anthropology provides an important framework for understanding. It resists the narrow view, asks the tough questions, contextualizes phenomena, gathers the evidence, studies and analyzes it, develops reasoned argument, and only then comes to judgment,” writes Dr. Waterston in her accompanying editorial.

At a time when immigration catalyzes human rights debates and the movement of people around the world has changed the global landscape, Open Anthropology provides a cross-cultural and historical perspective on migration. It also anticipates the upcoming AAA Public Education Initiative on migration, currently in development.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and made freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months for users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics that are of interest to the general public, educators, advocates and public policy makers.

Open Anthropology is available at www.aaaopenanthro.org

Help us name-storm

The AAA received a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to build a book review prototype. But “Book Review Prototype,” as a name, lacks the je ne sais quoi  we need to describe a new digital platform that publishes open access book reviews and wraps up new Web 2.0 functionality (like commenting tools, cover .gifs, and links to purchase books).

AAA and the prototype’s new editor, Justin Shaffner, want to hear which name do you like?

AAA Welcomes Justin Shaffner as Book Review Editor for Digital Book Review Process

The American Anthropological Association has named Justin Shaffner as Book Review Editor for its new digital book review platform. This innovative project is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Justin ShaffnerJustin is currently completing his PhD thesis in social anthropology at the University of Cambridge. He previously studied anthropology and philosophy at the University of Virginia.

He brings to the AAA Book Review editorship nearly fifteen years of experience in academic publishing, as well as involvement in various other digital projects, such as the Open Anthropology Cooperative and The Melanesian. Some of the former includes working with Prickly Pear Pamphlets (1999-2004), helping to ­found two open ­access journals, OAC Press (2009-2014) and Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory (2011), and being assistant (2003-2005) and associate editor (2009-2015) for Anthropology and Humanism, the journal of the Society for Humanistic Anthropology, a section of the AAA.

He conducted 18 months of fieldwork (2006-2008) with Marind speakers living in Middle Fly and Lake Murray region of the Western Province of Papua New Guinea. His research focused on the experiences of kamok-anim, or community leaders, as they attempted to elicit and maintain productive relations across various global alliances, from regional ritual networks to relations with transnational mining and logging corporations, NGOs, and the state.

His doctoral thesis takes the Marind concept of “dema” (cf. Van Baal 1966) as a starting point to analyze and describe the trans-­Fly, which spans both sides of the international border between Papua New Guinea and Indonesia, as a complex regional system. Taking inspiration from the Melanesian philosopher Bernard Narokobi (1977), he attempts to take the concept seriously, not as a “religion” (cf. Jensen 1963), but rather as a geo­philosophy, or philosophy of nature, in its own right, one which affords an opportunity to re­describe the environment, history, and political economy of the region.

More recently, his ethnographic research has served as impetus for co-organizing (with Rachel Douglas-Jones, Casper Bruun Jensen, and Brit Ross Winthereik) a workshop in Copenhagen in 2015 on capacity building, “Hope and Insufficiency: Capacity Building in Ethnographic Comparison.” The international workshop, funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation, seeks to bring into dialogue scholars whose work offers a comparative basis for analyzing capacity building from which to advance the first edited volume dedicated to theorizing capacity building in ethnographic comparison.

New Book on Race Now Available

2nd Ed. How Real is Race?A Second Edition of How Real is Race? A Sourcebook on Race, Culture and Biology [Mukhopadhyay, Henze, Moses] is now available.

Authors Carol C. Mukhopadhyay, Rosemary Henze and Yolanda T. Moses employ an activity-oriented, biocultural, approach to address the question How real is race? What is biological fact, what is fiction, and where does culture, enter? What do we mean when we say race is a “social construction?

The new edition adds cutting edge material on human biological variation, expands coverage on the social, structural, power, and inequality dimensions of race, goes beyond Black/White dimensions, and has a new chapter, “When is it racism? Who is a racist”. Visit the new book website for an online supplement with “hot” weblinks, a comments page, and other resources, including for pre-college educators.

Humanities E-Book releases Round 11

The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) released Round 11 of their online collection this August. These 353 titles bring the total of the volumes in the collection to 4,315. The new round includes additional titles from two of HEB’s original publishing partners, Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press, as well as books from new partners such as University of Toronto Press and Michigan State University Press.

All the titles in Humanities E-Book are available to American Anthropological Association members. The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) makes individual subscriptions available through standing membership in any of the 72 ACLS constituent societies.

The subscription offers unlimited access to 4,300 cross-searchable, full-text titles across the humanities and related social sciences. The titles in HEB have been selected and peer reviewed by ACLS constituent learned societies for their continued value in teaching and researching. The collection comprises both in- and out-of-print titles ranging from the 1880s through the present, and includes many prize-winning works.

Individual subscriptions are ideal for those whose school might not yet have an institutional subscription to HEB or for individual members of a learned society who might not be affiliated with a subscribing institution. (A full list of subscribing institutions can be found on the HEB website.) Individual subscriptions are USD $40.00 for a twelve-month subscription. AAA members can sign up via the HEB website.

For more information about individual subscriptions, contact subscriptions@hebook.org.

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