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2016 Call for Editor-In-Chief, American Anthropologist

The American Anthropological Association seeks applications for a new Editor-in-Chief of the discipline’s flagship journal, the American Anthropologist, for a four-year term beginning July 1, 2016. Now in its second century of continuous publication, the American Anthropologist publishes articles, reviews, and commentaries from the diverse anthropological community. It is the most widely circulated anthropology journal published by the American Anthropological Association and showcases the breadth of the discipline.

Editorship of the journal provides a unique opportunity for an anthropologist to be a central player in anthropological scholarship shaping the discipline’s identity, impacting the future of anthropology, and initiating and participating in transnational dialogues. The editor is not expected to have expertise in all subfields of anthropology, but to be interested in creatively developing vital conversations within and across fields and national boundaries that will invigorate and contribute positively to the landscape for the transmission of knowledge and collaborative engagement. Applicants are encouraged to develop innovative and creative approaches that will allow them as Editor-in-Chief to put their own stamp on the journal. Editors are encouraged to solicit articles and contributions for special sections, and to develop issues of the journal that highlight critical topics in anthropology and in public debate. As the publishing field continues to develop the editor should also embrace new digital forms for scholarly content and build best practices for collaborative editorial team engagement. Above all, the AAA Executive Board seeks an Editor-in-Chief who will maintain the journal as a leader in intellectual and scholarly advances.

The AAA appreciates support from candidates’ institutions and is especially aware of the importance of institutional recognition of the intellectual leadership and challenges entailed by the Editor-in-Chief’s position and responsibilities. Graduate assistant support and adequate space to house the journal are highly desirable with other kinds of institutional support significant for the success of operations. Candidates who are unable to get substantial institutional support, however, will also be considered with the expectation that AAA will work with the institution to insure core working needs are provided for. The position of Editor-in-Chief is a four-year appointment.

Click here for application and submission details.

American Anthropological Association Pioneers Digital Book Review Process

An innovative new platform for producing scholarly book reviews will be developed with the support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) announced today. “The new platform will reduce editorial turn-around time and expense, increase readership, and introduce dynamic content,” said Oona Schmid, AAA’s publishing director.

Using the current print-centric process, only a small fraction of books mailed out by presses results in a published book review. And even among these published reviews, they often appear at least one year – and sometimes up to four years – after a book’s publication. By using a completely digital workflow, the AAA will provide book authors with a wider audience and an opportunity for social engagement, as well as reducing costs for scholarly presses and the journals featuring reviews.

“Using digital information technology to improve the book review process is a potential game changer for academic publishing,” says Josh Greenberg, Director of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Scholarly Communication program. “It’s better for authors. It’s better for reviewers. It’s better for publishers. And most of all, it’s better for science, because it encourages and supports the debate, discussion, and evaluation that is the cornerstone of good scholarship. We’re honored to support the American Anthropological Association’s efforts to bring scholarly book reviewing into the digital age.”

The platform will expand the open source Open Journals System from the Public Knowledge Project. Once released, the platform will be available to any discipline or journal using OJS software. Freie Universität Berlin provided PKP with the original iteration of the Objects for Review plugin, and provides active guidance in the prototype development. Publishers will upload book descriptions into the system along with digital versions that will be electronically available to authorized reviewers. Reviewers will then upload their reviews into the database for approval and eventual publication online at the award-winning Anthropology News website.

Five university presses pledged early support of the platform, with more expressing great interest – University of Chicago Press, University of Nebraska Press, University of New Mexico Press, University Press of Colorado, and the University Press of Florida. The presses emphasized the need for improvements in the existing process. Darrin Pratt, Director at the University Press of Colorado, is looking forward to helping pioneer this “radically new workflow for scholarly book reviews.” Pratt notes, “the slow turnaround for book reviews in academic journals…is maddening for university presses.” He can recall titles that were reviewed so long after publication that the books were no longer in print. Pratt’s counterpart, John Byram, Director at University of New Mexico Press, also echoes frustration with the timely process. Byram anticipates “that these efforts will result in a more efficient, cost-effective, and accessible workflow process for a wide variety of international stakeholders.”

“This is an exciting time for publishing,” said Schmid. “The Sloan Foundation is providing the means for participating publishers and the Association to catalyze book reviews into a vibrant part of scholarly discourse.” Work will begin immediately to build the platform’s prototype version. By mid-2015 the prototype and new process with undergo evaluation to determine areas of improvement.

The prototype is expected to launch later this year.

Read more about the initiative in an article by Jennifer Howard at The Chronicle for Higher Education.

Science and Technology Studies and Agricultural Anthropology: Todd A. Crane in the New Issue of Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment

This month, Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment publishes its latest journal issue, Tending the Field: Special Issue on Agricultural Anthropology and Robert E. Rhoades. The issue brings together a collection of articles that expand upon Rhoades’s work in agricultural anthropology. Of particular note for readers interested in participatory and collaborative research is Todd A. Crane’s contribution, “Bringing Science and Technology Studies into Agricultural Anthropology: Technology Development as Cultural Encounter between Farmers and Researchers.”

Crane argues for a unique and innovative twist to the “farmer-back-to-farmer” (FB2F) approach in the development of agricultural technologies. In the FB2F approach, outlined by Robert Rhoades and Robert Booth in 1982, the development of technologies begins and ends with farmers, considering their perspectives and considerations in developing technologies, as well as their evaluation, adaptation, and integration of proposed technologies. Crane updates this model by proposing that empirical social research on scientists’ institutional cultures and technical practices additionally be considered in applied agricultural research- a proposal that creatively integrates perspectives from science and technology studies (STS) into the FB2F approach. “Unpacking the “back-to” part of “farmer-back-to-farmer” means acknowledging researchers as stakeholders in the process, just as much as farmers are,” Crane writes. This proposal is of both applied and theoretical interest. As Crane argues:

Conducting empirical social research on scientists’ technical practices, social organization, and institutional norms- alongside the same research done with farmers- will enable a better theorization of how and why certain forms of applied agricultural research work (or do not work), which should in turn enable applied research strategies to become more effective. Furthermore, by including both farmers and research scientists in the analytical lens, we can also better understand the “hows” and “whys” of cultural encounters that occur when farmers and scientists work together (47).

To read this article through open-access, click here. Read the full issue of Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment on AnthroSource.

Food-and-Language Methodologies: New Article in the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology

“Food and language have frequently been served up together on the same plate at the anthropological research table.” From this starting point, authors Jillian R. Cavanaugh and Kathleen Riley authored an article with collaborators Alexandra Jaffe, Christine Jourdan, Martha Karrebaek, Amy Paugh to provide a fascinating look at emerging food-and-language studies in, “What Words Bring to the Table: The Linguistic Anthropological Toolkit as Applied to the Study of Food.” This article is the second in a series on methods in linguistic anthropology that appears in the new issue of the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology available now on AnthroSource.

The article emerged from a roundtable at the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting entitled, “Food Talk as Semiotic Substance: Steps toward an Integrated Anthropology of Foodways and Discourse.” The authors identify “intriguing parallels” that link food and language and describe methods they have used in studying food and language simultaneously. Anthropologists interested in methods will particularly appreciate the discussion of “(e)merging food-and-language methodologies.” Punctuated by author reflections and contextualizing narrative, the authors provide unique insights into their use of anthropological methods in studying food and language, including participant-observation, ethnolinguistic analysis, food-oriented interviews, language socialization, collaborative transcription, and semiotic analysis of documents and media. In concluding the authors note their hopes for introducing this line of discussion:

First, broadly speaking, we hope to promote the value of looking across cultural modalities, not only language and food, but also language and a range of other expressive media. Secondly, and more specifically, we are seeking to encourage the application of linguistic anthropological and linguistic ethnographic methods and analytical tools to the study of food in order to open up new and productive terrains and topics (94).

To read the article, login to AnthroSource or click here.

Interested in more research, reviews and commentaries in the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology? Check out the new issue on AnthroSource!

New Open Anthropology Issue

Open Anthropology 150x150Open Anthropology, a digital-only publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its latest issue. In this issue, entitled Sport: Pleasure and Violence, Competition and Sociality, guest editor Niko Besnier (U Amsterdam) offers twelve articles and two book reviews of anthropological works that illustrate how anthropology sheds light on the ways in which sport is deeply intertwined with power, competition, play, money, and violence.

Guest Editor Besnier curates a set of articles that explore the social, cultural and economic aspects of sports across the globe and over time. As he notes, “Anthropologists are particularly well placed to analyze the complexities of what human beings do in social groups to understand the power of sport to variously provoke pleasure, incite violence, arouse competition and promote sociality.”

At a time when the people of the world remember the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi (Russia) and anticipate the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro, Open Anthropology provides a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the world of sports and its entanglement with state power, among other forces.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and is made freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months for users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics that are of interest to the general public and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

 

Open Anthropology is available at http://www.aaaopenanthro.org

Are You the Next Editor-in-Chief?

The American Anthropological Association seeks applications for a new Editor-in-Chief of the discipline’s flagship journal, the American Anthropologist, for a four-year term beginning July 1, 2016. Now in its second century of continuous publication, the American Anthropologist publishes articles, reviews, and commentaries from the diverse anthropological community. It is the most widely circulated anthropology journal published by the American Anthropological Association and showcases the breadth of the discipline.

Editorship of the journal provides a unique opportunity for an anthropologist to be a central player in anthropological scholarship shaping the discipline’s identity, impacting the future of anthropology, and initiating and participating in transnational dialogues. The editor is not expected to have expertise in all subfields of anthropology, but to be interested in creatively developing vital conversations within and across fields and national boundaries that will invigorate and contribute positively to the landscape for the transmission of knowledge and collaborative engagement. Applicants are encouraged to develop innovative and creative approaches that will allow them as Editor-in-Chief to put their own stamp on the journal. Editors are encouraged to solicit articles and contributions for special sections, and to develop issues of the journal that highlight critical topics in anthropology and in public debate. As the publishing field continues to develop the editor should also embrace new digital forms for scholarly content and build best practices for collaborative editorial team engagement. Above all, the AAA Executive Board seeks an Editor-in-Chief who will maintain the journal as a leader in intellectual and scholarly advances.

For complete position details and application information, click here.

New Virtual Issue of PoLAR: Law and Inequalities- Global and Local

lsa_flyer-lsa-virtual-issue_page_1Coinciding with the 50th Anniversary Law and Society Association (LSA) conference, PoLAR launches its fourth virtual issue, “Law and Inequalities- Global and Local” today! This exciting issue features 10 articles previously published in PoLAR that will be accessible for free through September. Additionally, the virtual issue features open-access postscripts by authors that provide reflections and updates on the authors’ research or related events that have taken place since the publication of the original article. An interview with legal anthropologists, Sally Engle Merry and Susan Bibler Coutin will also be available after the LSA conference. In this interview, conducted by two of PoLAR’s Digital Editorial Fellows, Sean Mallin and Stacy Topouzova, Merry and Coutin will discuss the themes and events of the LSA conference in relation to their joint American Ethnological Association/Association of Political and Legal Anthropology Presidential Address, “Technologies of Truth in the Anthropology of Conflict.”

Table of Contents

Griffiths, Anne (2000) “Gender, Power, and Difference: Reconfiguring Law from Bakwena Women’s Perspectives.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 23(2): 89-106.

Castro, Robert (2007) “Plying the Liberty Trade: Law, Empire-Building, and the Enforcement of Antislavery Scriptures in the Reconstruction of New Mexico.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 30(1): 109-130.

Jeffery, Laura (2006) “Historical Narrative and Legal Evidence: Judging Chagossians’ High Court Testimonies.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 29(2): 228-253.

Terrio, Susan (2003) “You’ll Get Your Day in Court: Judging Delinquent Youth at the Paris Palace of Justice.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 26(2): 136-164.

Newendorp, Nicole (2011) “Contesting “Law and Order”: Immigrants’ Encounters with “Rule of Law” in Postcolonial Hong Kong.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 34(1): 95-111.

Idrus, Rusaslina (2010) “From Wards to Citizens: Indigenous Rights and Citizenship in Malaysia.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 33(1): 89-108.

Speed, Shannon and Alvaro, Reyes (2002) “In Our Own Defense: Rights and Resistance in Chiapas.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 25(1): 69-89.

Rubin, Jonah (2008) “Adjudicating the Salvadoran Civil War: Expectations of the Law in Romagoza.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 31(2): 264-285.

Bunt, Laura (2008) “A Quest for Justice in Cusco, Peru: Race and Evidence in the Case of Mercedes Corimanya Lavilla.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 31(2): 286-302.

To access the issue, click here.

 

For more information on the 50th Anniversary Law and Society Association conference (May 29th-June 1st, 2014), click here. Of note, APLA members Robin Conley and Justin Richland have created a new Collaborative Research Network, “Ethnography, Law & Society.” The kickoff business meeting will be held at the LSA conference on Thursday, May 29th, 3:30-4:30 pm in Boardroom 3.

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