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Green Options for AAA Members

Earth Day is a great opportunity to remember the green options that the American Anthropological Association offers to its members:

AAA Journals To Go Fully Digital in 2016

pub modelReaders may recall that in November 2013, the AAA Executive Board adopted a series of recommendations from the Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing that embrace new ways of producing and distributing its journals and endeavor to get the association’s publishing program on sustainable footing. One of the several changes includes member print copies becoming fully digital starting in 2016. Individual members can purchase, at cost, a print subscription to any journal published by sections that member has joined if they wish to receive the print copy.

Don’t want to wait until 2016 for your digital copies? You can help lower our ecological footprint today by opting out of receiving AAA’s print journals. 14 section journals are currently participating in this special green initiative. Receive the same great content online as you would in the print version. Contact Members Services to participate today.

Green Annual Meeting Registration

2014-AAA-Annual-Mtg-logo-Small-CMYKMore than 25% of meeting attendees last year opted for the Green Registration. Offered at a discounted rate, the green registration offsets AAA’s carbon footprint by choosing to use an e-reader formatted program, online personal scheduler and/or the AAA Annual Meeting Mobile app to navigate the conference. Thus far, more than 30% of meeting registrants have opted to go green. Meeting Registration is going on now, if you haven’t already, opt to go Green today!

The Anthropology and the Environment Section offer guidelines, called “Greening the Meeting,” to help meeting participants reduce their carbon footprint. Their suggestions include individual choices to be made about transportation, use of standard hotel services, and communications.

Is the Affordable Care Act Really Affordable?

The newest issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly, a journal of the Society of Medical Anthropology, offers an in depth look at both the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and national health care systems worldwide.

Several of the articles in the journal offer a critical look at the ACA as the United States embarks its first health care reformation in over half a century. One article in particular, Critical Anthropology of Global Health “Takes A Stand” Statement: A Critical Medical Anthropological Approach to the U.S.’s Affordable Care Act looks at the driving force behind the ACA, it’s uneasy compromise with the insurance industry, the unconstitutionality of the original planned expansion of Medicaid, and the shortfalls the ACA imposes on the American population.

Written by Sarah Horton (UColorado, Denver), Cesar Abadía (UNacional de Columbia), Jessica Mulligan (Providence College) and Jennifer Jo Thompson (U Georgia) the article encourages anthropologists to join in the national conversation and sets benchmarks in which to measure the future progress of this emerging health care system. The authors come to conclude that “In the end, the ACA leaves the nation’s Goliath of a health care industry intact, imposing only mild regulations on insurance and pharmaceutical companies’ leveraging of profits” (p15).

Read the entire article, here.

Debut Issue of Economic Anthropology – Greed and Excess

SEA LogoThe Society for Economic Anthropology’s newest journal Economic Anthropology is now available!

The inaugural issue of Economic Anthropology, formerly published as the SEA Monograph Series, is now available on AnthroSource. This collection of articles from the proceedings of the Society for Economic Anthropology’s 2011 Annual Meeting Conference engages with and explores the concepts of “greed” and “excess” as accusations, ideas and behaviors that are shaped by social processes across time and place. Volume editors, Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijit note in their introduction that,

The articles in this collection are intended as just a first attempt to generate a broader conversation and move beyond accusatory judgments and folk concepts. Nonetheless, it is out hope that this issue will shed some new light on the ways and reasons that emotionally charged ideas and philosophies pertaining to greed and excess have emerged in past and present societies.

To access this exciting issue, login to AnthroSource.

Table of Contents

Economic AnthropologyIntroducing an Inquiry into the Social Economies of Greed and Excess – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijt

Section I: History and Contemporaneity of Greed and Excess
System Failure: Institutions, Incentives, and Collective Folly – James Surowiecki
Greed Is Bad, Neutral, and Good: A Historical Perspective on Excessive Accumulation and Consumption – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuij

Section II: Ambiguities of Surplus: Can Marginalized Peoples Be Greedy and Excessive?
Land, Labor, and Things: Surplus in a New West Indian Colony (1763-1807) – Mark W. Hauser
Poverty and Excess in Binge Economies – Richard Wilk
The Social and Economic Production of Greed Cooperation, and Taste in an Ohio Food Auction – Jeffrey H. Cohen and Susan M. Klemetti

Section III: Who Shares the Surplus: “Greedy” Subsistence Producers inTransition Economies
Greed in a “Tribal” Economy? Acquisitiveness and Reciprocity in Lisu Society – E. Paul Durrenberger and Kathleen Gillogly
Boons and Busts: Asset Dynamics, Disaster, and the Politics of Wealth in Rural Mongolia – Daniel J. Murphy
Risk-Seeking Peasants, Excessive Artisans: Speculation in the Northern Andes – Jason Antrosio and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld
Loci of Greed in a Caribbean Paradise: Land Conflicts in Bocas del Toro, Panama – Gayatri Thamp

Section IV: Entitled to the Surplus Greed and Excess among the Elites, Non-Elites, and the Nouveau Riche
The Potentiality and the Consequences of Surplus: Agricultural Production and Institutional Transformation in the Northern Basin of Mexico – Christopher Morehart
The Problem of Greed in Economic Anthropology: Sumptuary Laws and New Consumerism in China – Joseph Bosco

Section V: Some Perspectives and New Directions on the Anthropology of Greed and Excess
Folk and Scientific Concepts in the Study of Greed – Robert C. Hunt
The Rich Possibilities of Greed and Excess – Virginia R. Dominguez

Multimedia in Anthropology News Articles on Cultural Heritage

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Anthropology News (AN) is excited to present two essays in our series on Cultural Heritage that feature multimedia content and demonstrate how anthropologists can incorporate new technologies into their work and writing. By using multimedia technologies, readers are able to engage with and experience articles on AN in new and exciting ways. Contributors to Anthropology News can also use this technology to bring further texture to their research, analysis and writing. We encourage readers and contributors to try it out!

Multimedia in the Cultural Heritage Series

Antoinette T. Jackson’s article, “Intangible Cultural Heritage and Living Communities” allows readers to hear community members, Ms. Bertha and Ms. Florence as they share memories and reflections of their community, Nicodemus, KS. Listening to their voices, the reader is able to uniquely experience the history of this community and connect it with the work of the researcher. Jackson emphasizes the role “that the living community plays in cultural heritage preservation” and with the embedded sound clip, readers gain a deeper understanding of this role. Read the full article here.

Hülya Sakarya in, “Complexity of Heritage in Post-Conflict Settings,” shares with readers her fieldwork experience in Tiblisi, Georgia. Through an accompanying video, Sakarya brings readers into her fieldwork experience as she explores the complexity and ambiguity of the reopening of the  Abkhazian House at the Open Air Museum of Ethnography in Tiblisi, two decades since an ethnic conflict with Abkhazian separatists in Georgia. Click here for the full article.

For more in this great series on cultural heritage, check out the In Focus section of Anthropology News. Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels writes on “What is Cultural Heritage?,” Henrike Florusbosch explores the politics and economics of local heritage initiative in Mali and Ghana, Rabia Harmanşah describes doing fieldwork in contested places, such as Cyprus, Michael A Di Giovine and Sarah E Cowie consider, “The Definitional Problem of Patrimony and the Futures of Cultural Heritage,” Maria F Curtis provides analysis of the celebration of Nowruz in Houston, Richard Meyers, Charlotte E Davidson, April Eastman write on “Embracing Cultural Heritage in Higher Education Institutions,” Blaire O Gagnon discusses the use of the phrase “lean back” by an artisan-vendor in Mexico in comparison to Sheryl Sandberg’s promotion of “leaning in,” and Alejandro J Figueroa reflects on “Successful Local Cultural Heritage Management” in Honduras.

 

AAA President-elect Distinguishably Honored By Students

AWaterstonPhoto02.2014Named the 2014 Distinguished Faculty by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Alumni Association, Dr. Alisse Waterston will be honored during the annual Alumni Reunion in April. Dr. Waterston, a professor in the Department of Anthropology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice since 2003, is a cultural anthropologist who studies the human consequences of structural and systematic violence and inequality. She is the American Anthropological Association’s President-elect and Editor of the Association’s newest digital publication, Open Anthropology. Dr. Waterston is a Soros International Scholar affiliated with the Gender Studies Department, Tbilisi State University, Republic of Georgia. And she is the author of My Father’s Wars: Migration, Memory and the Violence of a Century, an intimate ethnography in the Routledge Series of Innovative Ethnographies.

Calling all Discussion Groups and Anthropology Clubs: Let’s Talk About the March Issue of Open Anthropology!

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Has the new issue of Open Anthropology, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care, piqued your interest in anthropological understandings of health, illness, medicine, and health care? Are you interested in building the conversation on your campus or in your community? Throughout March and April, AAA is encouraging anthropology clubs and discussion groups to explore, debate and analyze contemporary issues of health, illness, medicine and health care based on the material included in the March issue of Open Anthropology.

We’d then like to hear from you! Send us stories, videos, and/or photographs that highlight and illustrate the depth, liveliness and creativity of your discussion. Two submissions will be selected to be featured on the AAA blog in May.

Jump start your conversations using these questions:

  • In what ways does the idea of the “social life of” health, illness, medicine and health care that frames the specific articles in this issue of Open Anthropology, offer a way to shift public conversations on these issues?
  • How can anthropology help identify omissions in policy and public conversations regarding health and health care?
  • In current public conversations and contemporary policy debates on health, illness, medicine and health care, how are inequality and violence engaged with- or ignored? Using these articles, how can anthropologists use ethnography to shed light on inequality and violence?
  • How have these articles intersected with your own research and/or research interests?
  • How are anthropologists across the four fields of anthropology writing about the social life of health, illness, medicine and health care? Beyond the articles presented in this issue of Open Anthropology, what additional research, theories and concepts will help us illuminate our views of health, illness, medicine and  health care?

Please submit your stories and/or photographs to Jennie at jsimpson@aaanet.org by April 30th. We look forward to your submissions!

Open Anthropology – The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care: Anthropological Views

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Open Anthropology, a digital-only, public publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its third issue. In this edition, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care: Anthropological Views, editor Alisse Waterston (John Jay College, CUNY) curates eleven articles and three book reviews of anthropological works that encompass today’s health care debate, access to insurance and quality health care, social inequity, and historical perspectives on medicinal practices and well-being across cultures.

In her prefatory remarks, Waterston reflects on the national health care conversation, noting that “(t)he whole mess – the fights, the threats, the web crashes – was successful in capturing the public’s attention,” and is left to wonder if the cacophony served to distract the public from the key issues around access to health care. Editor Waterston offers a selection of anthropology articles that “help defamiliarize the ‘normal,’ that make strange the familiar, a process that can lead to new insights, understandings, and positions.”

At a time when the issues of health care and insurance are on the national agenda, Open Anthropology provides cross-cultural information and historical perspective to inform national and global health care policy and practice. Anthropologists recognize that when it comes to health care, “We are all in the same frail boat,” as Gerald D. Berreman notes in his article featured here. Others document obstacles to health and well-being as well as success stories in the effort to provide quality health care to all.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and will be freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics of interest to the general public, and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

Open Anthropology is available at http://www.aaaopenanthro.org

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