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Call for Papers – Special Issue: Campus Sustainability & Social Sciences

Today’s guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education – Universities and colleges have been among the leading places where sustainability is promoted on campus and beyond. The social sciences can offer a variety of valuable insights into how to enhance a broad range of these efforts at higher education institutions: from supporting recycling, waste reduction, water and energy conservation, renewable energy and alternative transportation use, sustainable food procurement, and green building construction to fostering a sustainability culture. This special issue aims to present contemporary, state-of-the-art applications of how social science theories, models, and findings can help overcome campus sustainability challenges – and – to illustrate the diversity of social science campus sustainability research conducted across the world.
Papers are sought from a range of social sciences including but not limited to anthropology, communication, economics, education, geography, psychology, political science, and sociology. Interdisciplinary social science contributions are welcome as well. Manuscripts may consist of:

  • Research syntheses of a particular campus sustainability challenge from the perspective of single or multiple social science disciplines.
  • Conceptual and theoretical frameworks illustrating how individual or multiple social science disciplines can contribute to enhancing campus sustainability.
  • Empirical campus sustainability research based on quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods, addressing and illustrating the benefits of drawing on the social sciences.
  • Evaluations of campus sustainability programs based on social science research.
  • Case studies of campus sustainability programs examined through the lens of a single or multiple social science disciplines.

Information and Instructions for submissions: Prospective authors should submit an abstract of around 500 words, outlining the proposed manuscript, directly to the guest editor (zintmich@umich.edu) by 15th November 2014.

 

New Resource: Course Conversations Assignment for all Faculty

This guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

Utilize this teaching activity that engages students and is easily integrated as an assignment into a wide variety of courses. It emphasizes civil discourse skills across political and cultural perspectives and focuses on the topic of sustainable energy (i.e. energy efficiency and renewable energies). The Course Conversations activity is applicable to all academic disciplines, is geared for both undergraduate and graduate students, and can be assigned in both large and small classes. Students act as co-hosts to the conversation. Conversations begin by understanding ground rules for civil discourse before the actual topic is discussed. Conversations can result in civic engagement opportunities where students communicate to decision makers their findings/conclusions regarding the benefits/potentials of energy efficiency and renewable energies. Course Conversations includes all materials needed to utilize this assignment in your course and provides an easy and automated set-up for grading and assessment. It has been featured at Harvard as a quality learning experience.

For Course Conversations teaching tools and resources see the following link: http://www.livingroomconversations.org/campus-conversations/

For more information, contact Debra Rowe at dgrowe@oaklandcc.edu or campusenergyconversations@gmail.com

 

New Book on Race Now Available

2nd Ed. How Real is Race?A Second Edition of How Real is Race? A Sourcebook on Race, Culture and Biology [Mukhopadhyay, Henze, Moses] is now available.

Authors Carol C. Mukhopadhyay, Rosemary Henze and Yolanda T. Moses employ an activity-oriented, biocultural, approach to address the question How real is race? What is biological fact, what is fiction, and where does culture, enter? What do we mean when we say race is a “social construction?

The new edition adds cutting edge material on human biological variation, expands coverage on the social, structural, power, and inequality dimensions of race, goes beyond Black/White dimensions, and has a new chapter, “When is it racism? Who is a racist”. Visit the new book website for an online supplement with “hot” weblinks, a comments page, and other resources, including for pre-college educators.

Have you seen GlacierHub?

Glacier HubGlacierHub seeks to expand and deepen the understanding of glaciers. It provides information about current scientific research, it tells stories of people who live near glaciers or who visit them, and it offers accounts of the efforts of communities and organizations to address the challenges brought by glacier retreat. It serves as well as a nexus to link people who are concerned about glaciers, so that they can communicate with each other and develop responses to the changes in glaciers. GlacierHub invites contributions—whether text, images, or sound files—from people who live near glaciers and from people who visit them, whether for research or for adventure or for the chance to see the beauty and majesty of glaciers from close up.

We humans have much to learn from glaciers, and the world we live in can benefit from our learning about them. They are found on every continent, in some of the world’s richest countries and some of the poorest. For residents of many high-elevation regions, glaciers give mountain homelands their distinctive character. For people who live further downslope, glaciers supply valuable water and can be sources of floods and landslides, reminding us of our dependence on the natural world. For both groups, and for those who live further away as well, glaciers are precious as well for their transcendent beauty.
And glaciers are endangered. In all areas of our warming world, they are shrinking, as winter snows are no longer sufficient to replenish their melting. So glaciers can become a theme for people who are trying to make sense of our changing world. As people search for ways to comprehend and address climate change, glaciers often come forward as potent elements in thought and action.

GlacierHub is managed by Ben Orlove, an anthropologist at the Earth Institute and CRED at Columbia University, with support of Nick Smith, Gina Stovall and Brad Swain.

SciCast – Crowdsourcing future development in science and technology

Today’s guest blog post is written by Alan I. Leshner, CEO, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

If crowdsourcing can raise money for research worldwide, why can’t it raise questions and predict probabilities of future developments in science and technology?

We think that’s an interesting proposition. That’s why AAAS has asked us to share information about SciCast, a research project run by George Mason University and funded by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), to develop the largest crowdsourced prediction platform for science and technology, ever. The purpose of this project is to determine whether crowdsourcing can be used to accurately predict the future of science and technology. Questions vary by discipline and focus area, and range from the more applied science and engineering advancements to the highly technical, basic science achievements.

We invite you to explore SciCast, register, answer questions, and join the SciCast community. Approximately 7000 people have already signed up and are answering questions.

If you are interested in learning more about the project or would like to join the select pool of experts who submit questions and review unpublished questions, please contact scicast@aaas.org.

 

New Archaeology Division Grants for Archiving Digital Data

AD Grant for Archiving Digital Data

To assist members of the AD in the preservation and dissemination of their data, images, and documents, the Archaeology Division of the AAA has established a grant program to support the archiving of digital archaeological data and documents in tDAR, an international digital repository. Reports and data shared through tDAR are made accessible on the web and their long-term preservation is ensured.

Five $200 grants are available annually for AD members to cover the upload fees in tDAR. $200 covers the upload fees for 6 files totaling up to 60 MB.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY SEPTEMBER 1st to the President Elect (see Officers for contact information), via e-mail (as a word document or PDF attachment-please include your last name in the name of the attachment). They should include the following:

• Your contact information
• A 2-page, single-spaced explanation of the files to be uploaded and their importance for the discipline.

Digital files contributed to tDAR through the grant program must be documented as completely as possible using tDAR’s web-based resource entry forms.

Applicants will be notified of the decisions by October 1st. Successful applicants will be able to access a voucher in tDAR for the grant amount.

AD Grant Program for Archiving Legacy Digital Data

In addition to the regular digital archiving program, the AD has established one annual $1000 grant for the archiving of larger quantities of legacy data that are likely to be lost without efforts made to preserve them.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY SEPTEMBER 1st to the President Elect (see Officers for contact information), via e-mail (as a word document or PDF attachment-please include your last name in the name of the attachment). They should include the following:

• Your contact information
• A 4-page, single spaced explanation of the project whose data, documents, etc. are to be preserved, the importance of this body of research, and the documents, datasets, etc. that are to be archived .

$1000 covers the upload fees for 33 files totaling up to 330 MB. Digital files contributed to tDAR through the grant program must be documented as completely as possible using tDAR’s web-based resource entry forms.

Applicants will be notified of the decisions by October 1st. Successful applicants will be able to access a voucher in tDAR for the grant amount.

New Open Anthropology Issue

Open Anthropology 150x150Open Anthropology, a digital-only publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its latest issue. In this issue, entitled Sport: Pleasure and Violence, Competition and Sociality, guest editor Niko Besnier (U Amsterdam) offers twelve articles and two book reviews of anthropological works that illustrate how anthropology sheds light on the ways in which sport is deeply intertwined with power, competition, play, money, and violence.

Guest Editor Besnier curates a set of articles that explore the social, cultural and economic aspects of sports across the globe and over time. As he notes, “Anthropologists are particularly well placed to analyze the complexities of what human beings do in social groups to understand the power of sport to variously provoke pleasure, incite violence, arouse competition and promote sociality.”

At a time when the people of the world remember the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi (Russia) and anticipate the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro, Open Anthropology provides a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the world of sports and its entanglement with state power, among other forces.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and is made freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months for users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics that are of interest to the general public and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

 

Open Anthropology is available at http://www.aaaopenanthro.org

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