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AAA Appoints Jeff Martin as New Director of Communications and Public Affairs

MartinJeff_325The American Anthropological Association (AAA) has appointed Jeff Martin, a communications veteran with more than 25 years experience in the field, as the Association’s new director, communications and public affairs. Martin will be responsible for directing the Association’s media outreach, public education, and government relations programs.

“Jeff Martin brings a wealth of public relations experience to the table,” said AAA Executive Director Ed Liebow. “The knowledge he has gained working for the non-profit, private, and government sectors as well as community-based groups give him a distinct perspective on the nuances of communicating across our broad spectrum of diverse members and sister organizations. His extensive travel and cross-cultural skills acquired living overseas, from the South Pacific to the Caribbean, will also add a great deal of value to our organization and anthropology as we face global challenges that require collaborative solutions.”

Before joining AAA, Martin has served in public relations capacities for the Council on Foundations, The Nature Conservancy, and Peace Corps. He has also worked with international firms including Bozell, Kenyon & Eckhardt, and Edelman Public Relations Worldwide.

A graduate from Arizona State University, he worked as a journalist before going into public affairs and has won awards from the Public Relations Society of America and the New Jersey Press Association. He also has had articles featured in several publications, including Travel & Leisure, Cineaste, American Cowboy, and the Denver Post.

 

CONTACT:

Jeff Martin
Director, Communications and Public Affairs
571-483-1163
Mobile: 240-393-1149
jmartin@aaanet.org

Joslyn Osten,
Marketing and Public Relations Manager,
703-528-1902 x 1171
Mobile: 571-581-8262
josten@aaanet.org

- – AAA – –

The American Anthropological Association, dedicated to advancing human understanding and addressing the world’s most pressing problems since its founding in 1902, is the world’s largest professional anthropology organization.

Webinar Wednesday March 18: Applied Anthropology in the National Parks

As the National Park Service (NPS) approaches its centennial in 2016, the NPS Cultural Anthropology and Archeology Programs continue to engage in research with deep roots in communities across America.By partnering with universities and scholars in the CESU Network (Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units), the NPS funds applied research in ethnography and archeology.This session will introduce current, completed, and upcoming NPS-CESU research; how to submit letters of interest for research through the CESU network; and how students may become involved in applied work in parks.

Keywords: parks; applied; heritage; research; government

Links:
NPS Cultural Anthropology Program: www.nps.gov/ethnography

NPS Archeology Program: www.nps.gov/archeology

Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network: www.cesu.org

Joe Watkins is the Supervisory Cultural Anthropologist and Chief of the NPS Tribal Relations and American Cultures. He oversees the Park Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program, the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, and the Cultural Anthropology Program from the NPS Washington Area Service Office.

Stanley Bond is the Chief Archeologist for the National Park Service and Consulting Archeologist for the Department of the Interior. He has managed a number of CESU projects as a NPS Archeologist, Resource Manager, and Superintendent. Current CESU projects sponsored by the NPS Washington Archeology Program include a Southwest mission travel itinerary, a webinar lecture series, work with Latino high school students, analysis of digital imaging practices, and training for Afghan cultural heritage professionals.

Jennifer Talken-Spaulding is the Regional Cultural Anthropologist for the NPS National Capital Region. She manages multiple applied anthropology projects and a student internship program in support of national park units in three states and the District of Columbia. Research topics include contemporary communities, heritage preservation, and urban subsistence fishing.

Tom Fish is the National Coordinator for the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network. Tom works across government, academia, and the NGO community to facilitate collaborative research, technical assistance, and education/capacity development in support of public trust resource stewardship. Tom’s work covers a wide range of topics relating to land use planning, marine conservation, applied social science and human dimensions, and training for protected area managers in the U.S. and abroad.

Webinar Wednesday returns February 18, 2015 with Elizabeth Briody!

Sometimes Practice Makes Perfect: Cultural Changes in the Training of Anthropologists with Elizabeth Briody

I am proud to announce the American Anthropological Association’s webinar series is returning.  As was the case in 2014, we’ll try and alternate between webinars focused on professional and educational development, and webinars exploring more topical issues.  As part of National Anthropology Day (week?), the event is complimentary, but you will be required to register here. The event will begin at 2 PM EST, and will include a in-depth Q&A session at the end. Be sure to check your system beforehand, so you’ll be ready to go.

Elizabeth Briody_web icon

 Abstract

If you are either a faculty member or a student interested in training related to professional anthropological careers, this webinar is for you!

Interest in anthropological practice has never been higher.Students continue to seek greater job market preparation yet many faculty wonder how to help them.We will talk about:

1.Key differences between “traditional” anthropology programs and applied/practicing-oriented programs

2.Commonalities across high performing applied programs

3.Four distinct models of program effectiveness, highlighting the cultures of the University of Memphis, University of Maryland-College Park, Northern Arizona University, and the University of North Texas

4.If you are a faculty member:How do you build a program with a focus on application and practice?

5.If you are a student:How do you choose a program that will work for you?

Bio

Elizabeth K. Briody, Ph.D. is Founder and Principal of Cultural Keys LLC, a firm that helps companies and nonprofits understand and address organizational and cultural-change issues.  Briody has helped clients in many industries, including those at General Motors where she worked for 24 years.  She is currently a member of the AAA Executive Board and just completed her service as Chair of the AAA Working Group on Mentoring.

For more information on AAA webinars check out our main page: http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/conferences.cfm or email me at conferences@aaanet.org. Check out the webinar here:

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

karen

Dr. Karen Kelsky is the founder and principal of The Professor Is In, a blog and business dedicated to helping Ph.D.s turn their advanced degrees into jobs.  A former R1 tenured professor in Anthropology, and department head in the Humanities, Dr. Karen demystifies the unspoken rules that govern university hiring. In addition to blogging on every aspect of the job market, from building a competitive record and planning a publishing trajectory, to writing job applications, interviewing, and negotiating an offer, Dr. Karen works directly with clients on their individual job searches.  She also has a book in press with Random House, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job.   It comes out August 4, 2015.

In this webinar, I walk you through the basic expectations and potential pitfalls of the dreaded Campus Visit (sometimes called a Fly-Out) in Anthropology.There will be time for Q and A at the end, so bring questions!

We will examine:

 -The basic organization of a campus visit  -The job talk and Q and A
 -The single biggest pitfall for candidates  -The teaching demo
 -The initial arrangements and scheduling  -Handling meals gracefully
 -Preparing for the visit  -What to wear, especially in cold weather
- Meetings throughout the day

Check out the webinar here!

The 2014 Annual Meeting Mobile App has arrived!

Print I’m sure you’ve all be waiting with baited breath for the official release of this year’s annual meeting mobile application.  There are quite a few search-ability enhancements you’ll all appreciate. Be sure to take advantage of the communication and scheduling options as well.

I wanted to take some time specifically to address an issue we had last year, which was availability to recently registered attendees.  While we would like to provide you with instantaneous access to this amazing app, it isn’t always feasible.  I won’t bore you with details, but there will be a lag between the time you’ve registered and the time you have access to the mobile app. With any luck this will be mitigated to an hour or so. If you go a day without having access to the mobile app, then you might want to contact one of the staff (who will probably direct you to me).  You patience during this process is greatly appreciate, as we are a constantly evolving (and hopefully improving) association.

For example, I just ran the attendee list. So if you registered after 11/24/2014, then you will likely not be on the mobile app list until the next update is done, which will be tomorrow.

Without further delay, you can pick your app up on the iTunes Store or the Android Store. We don’t have a Windows App or one for Blackberry, but if there’s enough of a demand, I’ll try and get something together for next year.

Webinar Wednesday: Samuel Gerald Collins and Social Network Analysis for Qualitative Research

Samuel Gerald Collins_blog  Join the American Anthropological Association tomorrow at 3 PM Eastern Time for a complimentary webinar examining Social Network Analysis.  This webinar will provide practical take-away knowledge dealing with NodeXL, a free and open source template for Microsoft® Excel® 2007, 2010 and 2013 that makes it easy to explore network graphs.  NodeXL helps bridge the gap between qualitative and quantitative analysis.  This is a must see webinar for anyone looking for a new method of data gathering, or if you feel like you could brush up on your skills.

Samuel Gerald Collins is an anthropologist at Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland.  His research examines the urban as the confluence of people and social media.  He is the author of various books, book chapters and articles, among them All Tomorrow’s Cultures: Anthropological Engagements With the Future (Berghahn, 2008), Library of Walls (2009) and, along with co-author Matthew Durington, Networked Anthropology (Routledge, 2014).  He is currently in Seoul on a Fulbright Grant.

Sign up for the webinar here: https://aaanetevents.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=aaanetevents when the event begins, you will be prompted to use the password “anthro” Be sure to run a Mic/Speaker audio test (found in the communications tab) and that your speakers are set to the right internal or external source.

Webinar Summary:

1. Terms for Social Network Analysis.

2. Using NodeXL

3. Case Study 1: Who are my interlocutors?

4. Case Study 2: Where is my field site?

5. Case Study 3: What happened to my research?

6. Additional Resources

You will not need to download NodeXL for this event, but if you are interested in checking it out beforehand, it is available here: http://nodexl.codeplex.com/

Call for Papers – Special Issue: Campus Sustainability & Social Sciences

Today’s guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education – Universities and colleges have been among the leading places where sustainability is promoted on campus and beyond. The social sciences can offer a variety of valuable insights into how to enhance a broad range of these efforts at higher education institutions: from supporting recycling, waste reduction, water and energy conservation, renewable energy and alternative transportation use, sustainable food procurement, and green building construction to fostering a sustainability culture. This special issue aims to present contemporary, state-of-the-art applications of how social science theories, models, and findings can help overcome campus sustainability challenges – and – to illustrate the diversity of social science campus sustainability research conducted across the world.
Papers are sought from a range of social sciences including but not limited to anthropology, communication, economics, education, geography, psychology, political science, and sociology. Interdisciplinary social science contributions are welcome as well. Manuscripts may consist of:

  • Research syntheses of a particular campus sustainability challenge from the perspective of single or multiple social science disciplines.
  • Conceptual and theoretical frameworks illustrating how individual or multiple social science disciplines can contribute to enhancing campus sustainability.
  • Empirical campus sustainability research based on quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods, addressing and illustrating the benefits of drawing on the social sciences.
  • Evaluations of campus sustainability programs based on social science research.
  • Case studies of campus sustainability programs examined through the lens of a single or multiple social science disciplines.

Information and Instructions for submissions: Prospective authors should submit an abstract of around 500 words, outlining the proposed manuscript, directly to the guest editor (zintmich@umich.edu) by 15th November 2014.

 

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