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Pre-dissertation Grant and Post Doctoral Fellowship Opportunities in China Studies

ACLS - LUCE Fellowship Opportunity

Applications are now available online for Pre-dissertation grants and Postdoctoral Fellowships in the second competition of the Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies.

The Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies seeks to maintain the vitality of China Studies in the U.S. through fellowships and grants designed primarily for scholars early in their careers. Studies on and in China have developed over the last 30 years in the United States into a robust field, but current conditions pose daunting problems, especially for scholars just before and just after the dissertation.

 Predissertation-Summer Grants, for graduate students who wish to conduct preliminary preparations in China prior to beginning basic research for the dissertation. The grants are for graduate students — with a Ph.D. prospectus in hand or developing one — to investigate the research currently underway in Chinese archives and field sites, to establish contact with Chinese scholars, and to secure necessary permissions for their own fieldwork or archival research;

 Postdoctoral Fellowships, for scholars who are revising their Ph.D. dissertations for publication or embarking on new research projects.

The deadline for applications is November 12, 2013.

To start your application register at ofa.acls.org/ or click the Online Fellowship Application tab on the program’s page.

OFA

More information on the program may be found on the ACLS website at acls.org/programs/china-studies/.

Please send all inquiries to chinastudies@acls.org.

American Council of Learned Societies
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Oppose devastating cuts to the National Endowment for the Humanities!

Now that the government shutdown is over and Congress is beginning new budget negotiations, the proposed 49 percent cut to the National Endowment for the Humanities is back on the table. Just last week, one of the budget negotiators invoked the cut as he questioned the appropriateness of NEH grants. You can make sure that his are not the last words that our elected officials hear on the value of NEH by sending a message today.

We need you, your friends, and your colleagues to send messages in support of renewed investments in the humanities. Thousands of messages from advocates helped to put the proposed cuts on hold this summer, and by sending this new message, you can oppose the cuts and help restore NEH’s critical support for the humanities.

Lend your name to the effort by sending a message to your elected representatives.

Click  here to send a message.

neh_at_logo

Background
In its FY 2014 budget resolution, the House of Representatives Budget Committee called for the complete elimination of funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities, writing that the programs funded by NEH “…go beyond the core mission of the federal government, and they are generally enjoyed by people of higher-income levels, making them a wealth transfer from poorer to wealthier citizens.” The House subcommittee that oversees the NEH’s appropriation has followed through on the spirit of this resolution by approving a 49 percent cut to the agency’s budget.

Funding for NEH is already at just 29 percent of its peak and 62 percent of its average.

After years of deep cuts, the Obama Administration has proposed restoring some of NEH’s capacity with a 12 percent increase in funding.  

Click  here to send a message.

Share with your friends!

RFP – Small Grants for Developing Ethics Curricular Materials

The AAA Small Grants Program seeks to foster the development and use of curricular materials for the teaching and communication of ethics and ethical practice across the discipline of anthropology. Administered by the AAA Committee on Ethics, this small grant program encourages the awareness of and innovation in ethics curricular materials used in introductory, undergraduate, and graduate classes. Proposals for the development of curricular materials in a variety of forms are welcome, including texts, films, blogs, websites, exhibits, and other innovative media forms.  The grant recipient(s) will have ten months to complete these new curricular materials, the results of which will be featured in the “Ethical Currents” column of the December issue of Anthropology News as well as on the AAA ethics blog, and highlighted at the Annual Meeting.

The deadline for proposals is November 8, 2013.

Click here for eligibility, proposal format and submission details.

The Second Issue of Open Anthropology is Here!

Open Anthropology 150x150Violence is the theme of the second issue of Open Anthropology. The collection “On Violence” offers information, revelations, historical facts, descriptions of context and portraits of situations over time and place, a sampling of anthropological findings on the subject. Ten articles, two book reviews, and “The Editor’s Note” comprise this anthology written by anthropologists across time, sub-discipline, and journal title culled from the full AAA collection. 

“Taken as a whole, this collection deepens understanding and draws attention to the critical ingredients in the making of violence, a phenomenon ubiquitous in the contemporary world,” notes editor Alisse Waterston (John Jay College, CUNY). Synthesizing major anthropological viewpoints on the topic, Dr. Waterston identifies a key feature of violence and raises central questions that anthropologists answer:  “Domination is a critical element. In what specific way is the playing field of social life uneven? Who uses violence, of what types, and to what ends?”

Content in Open Anthropology is selected from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting any user to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics of interest to the general public, and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

Popular Anthropology: Buttering Up Humanity

Today’s guest blog post is by Erin B. Taylor (ICS-UL) of PopAnth.

Some years ago, when I was working at The University of Sydney, a colleague of mine stopped me in the corridor to complain. “Nobody listens to anthropologists,” she lamented, “We have so many interesting things to say about the world, but people don’t pay any attention.”

I was puzzled. Not because I disagree on either count: I think she’s right that our voice gets subsumed to that of economists, political commentators, and publicists. I also agree that anthropologists can provide a historically-grounded, cross-culturally informed perspective on contemporary events that is of real social value.

My puzzlement, rather, was because to the best of my knowledge, this particular colleague never made any effort to be heard. She published exclusively in academic journals behind paywalls, didn’t do press releases, didn’t write for newspapers, didn’t even blog. Did she really expect that public servants, the media, and people at large would go to the effort of seeking out her and her opinions?

This encounter triggered a personal quest to find out more about the state of public anthropology. I quickly discovered that I wasn’t the only one. Thomas Hylland Eriksen, in his book Engaging Anthropology, writes that “Anthropology should have changed the world, yet the subject is almost invisible in the public sphere outside the academy” (2006:1). One of my favorite articles on the subject is by Greg Downey who, on his Neuroanthropology blog, argues that anthropology’s difficulties with engaging the public is at least partially a branding problem. He then presents a series of fascinating ideas on how to fix it.

There are plenty of anthropologists who are doing something about it. Anthropologists globally are publishing their work in news venues such as the BBC, the Financial Times, and the Trinidad Guardian. Hundreds, possibly thousands, of us are blogging our thoughts on personal and collective websites, including The Huffington Post and The Conversation. Others are interviewed on radio shows or run community workshops. The California Series in Public Anthropology provides an incentive for authors to write about their engagements with communities and policies. Our brand is looking better since Eriksen published his book in 2006.

One thing I noticed, however, is a lack of ways for anthropologists who would like to write for the public to get started. This is partially because too few academics are aware of what the possibilities are, as the work of their more public-facing colleagues remains largely invisible. There are also relatively few venues in which people can experiment with this kind of writing. Personal blogs are a beginning, but a chronic lack of feedback means that it’s hard to know whether you’re on the right track. And without having a sense of how you’re doing, it can be daunting to submit an article to a newspaper.

PopAnthThis was a major reason why Gawain Lynch, John McCreery and I began the community website PopAnth: Hot Buttered Humanity. We began building the site in July last year, after an exhaustive search turned up exactly zero generalist anthropology websites that are truly written for a popular audience. There are many brilliant blogs out there, but they either focus on narrow topics, or include academic content such as jargon or calls for papers. We deliberately designed PopAnth to cover all branches of anthropology because we wanted to see what kinds of topics would prove popular.

In just over a year since launch, the site has grown surprisingly fast, and last month we had 90,000 unique visitors (bots largely edited out of our analytics). This is a pretty impressive feat for a non-profit website that relies on a small crew of committed editors. I’m particularly happy that authors have been courageous enough to send us off-beat stories that otherwise might never have seen the light of day. Our articles have covered topics as diverse as the history of Rastafarianism in Jamaica, land use rights among footballers in Trinidad, metal theft in the United Kingdom, drug markets in Colombia, consumer freedom in Germany, and angry tourists in Madagascar.

What makes PopAnth work? In my opinion, it’s the effort we put in to making popular anthropology visible. We don’t just promote ourselves, we use our website and social media to promote popular anthropology wherever it is published: newspapers, blogs, books, TED talks, and so on. This increases our audience base and helps make anthropology a household name.

Crucially, we provide a mentoring service to new public writers, helping them polish their articles for PopAnth and gain confidence to submit their work to other venues. We also act as a hub connecting new popular authors to old hands. Because we publish on merit, not qualifications, our authors are just as likely to be undergraduates as they are to have regular columns in The Huffington Post or Psychology Today. This means that up-and-coming authors who aren’t sure where to publish can gain inspiration from seeing what their colleagues are doing.

What’s the next step in getting public anthropology out there? My feeling is that cross-promotion will help us all build our audiences and contributor bases. To this end, I’ve begun talking with people people from other groups, such as Savage Minds, DANG, Ethnography Matters, the Society for Visual Anthropology, and others about how we can best work together to stay in communication and build collaborations. I’d like to invite everyone to join the conversation in the PopAnth group at the Open Anthropology Cooperative. And, of course, if you want to write for PopAnth, you can check out our Contributions page. The more we write for the public, the more the public will be able to listen.

Online Open Forums on Revised Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

ACRLThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) invites you to attend one of their free online open forums to learn more about the work of their task force appointed to oversee substantial revisions to the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education that will be completed by June 2014. The Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education, first adopted in 2000, have defined information literacy for librarians, educators, and assessment agencies. The task force is working on a new approach that underscores the critical need for faculty members and librarians to collaborate to effectively address information literacy education that aligns with disciplinary content. While the exact approach is still under discussion, two new elements will be incorporated: threshold concepts and metaliteracy. These two foundational elements should provide the basis for more sustained collaborations with disciplinary faculty and create more aligned teaching and learning communities at the institutional level.

During the online open forum you will learn about the direction the task force is taking with the revisions, the composition of the group, and opportunities for you to provide feedback or ask questions about the process. Due to limited space we ask you to attend as a group under one registration. We encourage you to include stakeholders from across campus including but not limited to librarians, faculty, provosts, academic support services, general education curriculum committees, and members of accrediting agencies.

 

There is no charge to participate in an online open forum and each lasts one hour. Online open forums will be held:

         Thursday, October 17, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

         Tuesday, October 29, 8am Pacific/9am Mountain/10am Central/11am Eastern

         Monday, November 4, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

Sign up is limited to 300 logins for each event, first-come first-served. Register now! Links to the recorded online open forums will be posted afterwards on the website.

Where Can We Go From Here: Documenting and Addressing Race and Racism in the Discipline

Today’s guest blog post is by the Task Force on Race and Racism in Anthropology co-chair, Dr. Raymond Codrington (Codrington Consulting)

Anthropology & Race/ism
Anthropology has made significant contributions to academic and popular understandings of race and racism. It’s challenged commonly held notions of identity and justice while illuminating structural disparities that are based on racial identity.

Today’s racism is coded and less overt, but it effectively continues policies and practices that restrict racialized minorities’ access to social and economic equality. Anthropologists continue to name, analyze and challenge coded policies in recent pieces such as Faye Harrison’s Who Has the Right to Self-Defense and Life in So-Called “Post-Racial” Society?, President’s Mullings’ discussion of the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Voting Rights Act and Dana-Ain Davis and Christa Craven’s discussion on race and the Defense of Marriage Act.

Unfortunately, race still plays a noticeable role in structuring the discipline. And this in turn helps maintain outdated public perceptions of anthropology as racially white.

The AAA recently took steps to address these issues. Last year, AAA President Leith Mullings formed the Task Force on Race and Racism in Anthropology to develop specific plans for recruitment and retention that will increase the numbers of racialized minority anthropologists in the anthropological workforce. This effort deliberately builds on previous efforts to address race in the discipline that go back forty-some years, to the Minority Experience in Anthropology (1973), and the more recent 2010 Commission on Race and Racism in Anthropology.

The Task Force on Race & Racism in Anthropology is charged with suggesting specific mechanisms for implementing the recommendations of the 2010 Commission.

What we’ve done so far:

Developed an online membership survey to learn about and analyze the current status of racialized anthropologists in the profession. It contains general questions and specific sections addressed to faculty, to students and to practitioners to get a broad sense of the discipline across race and ethnicity. The survey should provide a baseline of data and understanding from which to measure our progress going forward. Survey data will give a snapshot of the state of racial diversity and racial climate and the experience of racialized minorities today. It will also guide efforts to design interventions and improve the outcomes for racialized minorities in the discipline.

Worked with AAA staff to develop a webpage that will gather in one place a variety of information about race and racism in anthropology, including current works about race by anthropologists as well as links to initiatives, section programs, activities, and opportunities of interest to racialized minority anthropologists.

Organized a strategy session for Chicago with subfield and section leadership to develop specific best practices for recruiting students of color to the discipline, as well as recruiting and retaining racialized minority faculty, especially in subfields where they are severely underrepresented. The 2013 annual meetings will include a Task Force sponsored Presidential Workshop, Numbers Matter: How Do We Create a More Racially Diverse Anthropology? Section and subfield participants will share their knowledge about opportunities, challenges, and best practices in regard to recruitment and retention. The event will engage in open dialogue about the strengths and weaknesses of programs within their section or subfield. The workshop will also consider ways that the AAA can publicize and enhance existing programs such as summer internships, travel grants, and career development workshops that target students of color. The event is open to those who are actively engaged around these issues as well as those who want to learn more about their context and experiences.

What you can do:

Take the online survey. We will announce the survey launch on the AAA’s blog as well as through target mailing through various listservs.

Attend the Presidential Workshop event on recruitment and retention in Chicago entitled Numbers Matter: How Do We Create a More Racially Diverse Anthropology on Friday November 22 at 12:15-1:30. Please consult the AAA Annual Meeting Program for room location.

The Task Force hopes to facilitate a more open and inclusive dialogue on race and racism in the discipline through structured dialogue that is informed by both quantitative and qualitative data. From this approach, a more measured conversation will hopefully follow that is focused on strategic interventions that will benefit the discipline as a whole. More generally, we would like to bring the discussion of race and racism in line with other professional associations such as the APA, ASA who have defined policies around diversity and closely monitor and document statistics in regard race, diversity and inclusion on an annual basis. We feel that anthropology has the great potential to reframe the relationship between race, research and practice that can have implications within and beyond the discipline.

Raymond Codrington, Ph.D.
Codrington Consulting

RFP – Small Grants for Developing Ethics Curricular Materials

The AAA Small Grants Program seeks to foster the development and use of curricular materials for the teaching and communication of ethics and ethical practice across the discipline of anthropology. Administered by the AAA Committee on Ethics, this small grant program encourages the awareness of and innovation in ethics curricular materials used in introductory, undergraduate, and graduate classes. Proposals for the development of curricular materials in a variety of forms are welcome, including texts, films, blogs, websites, exhibits, and other innovative media forms.  The grant recipient(s) will have ten months to complete these new curricular materials, the results of which will be featured in the “Ethical Currents” column of the December issue of Anthropology News as well as on the AAA ethics blog, and highlighted at the Annual Meeting.

The deadline for proposals is November 8, 2013.

Click here for eligibility, proposal format and submission details.

Julie Livingston Receives MacArthur Fellowship

Congratulations to Dr. Julie Livingston (Rutgers U)! Recently named a 2013 MacArthur Fellow, she is a medical historian who combines archival research with ethnography to explore the care and treatment of individuals suffering from chronic illnesses and debilitating ailments in Botswana. Click here to learn more about Dr. Livingston and her research. Click on the below image to watch an excerpt about her fellowship:

Julie Livingston

Julie was one of 24 individuals recognized in this year’s class of MacArthur Fellows. The press release by the MacArthur Foundation describes this class as “extraordinarily creative people who inspire us all”:

MacArthur named its 2013 class of MacArthur Fellows, recognizing 24 exceptionally creative individuals with a track record of achievement and the potential for even more significant contributions in the future.

Fellows will each receive a no-strings-attached stipend of $625,000 (increased from $500,000) paid out over five years. Without stipulations or reporting requirements, the Fellowship provides maximum freedom for recipients to follow their own creative vision.

“This year’s class of MacArthur Fellows is an extraordinary group of individuals who collectively reflect the breadth and depth of American creativity,” said Cecilia Conrad, Vice President, MacArthur Fellows Program. “They are artists, social innovators, scientists, and humanists who are working to improve the human condition and to preserve and sustain our natural and cultural heritage. Their stories should inspire each of us to consider our own potential to contribute our talents for the betterment of humankind.”

Calling All Anthropologists – We Need You for Back To School

Today’s guest blog post is by the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting Program Chairs, Dr. Dana-Ain Davis and Dr. Alaka Wali. Share your passion with the local community through the Back to School program this November!

Dear Colleagues,

We hope you will sign up to participate in the first Anthropologists Back to School event, to be held at the beginning of the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting on Tuesday, November 20 from 9am-12pm. The Program Co-Chairs and the Executive Program Committee have organized this special initiative to provide a way for all of us attending the Annual Meeting to give back to the city of Chicago. Through this program, we will inspire young people and their teachers to pursue anthropological forms of inquiry.

Photo Courtesy of The Huffington Post

Photo Courtesy of The Huffington Post

Undergraduate and Graduate students are encouraged to participate. Registration for the AAA Annual Meeting is not required to participate in Anthropologist Back to School. Sign up today!

Currently there are several exciting Anthropologists Back to School programs under development. Here is a sneak peek:

Elizabeth Chin is going to create a display on the story of Jefferson-Hemmings connections, using Barbie dolls at the South Side Community Arts Center.

Dvera Saxton will present on school district struggles against pesticide contamination at the Casa Michoacan.

Rosa Cabrera will present the amazing story of a mural at the Latino Cultural Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Gina Perez will also be there sharing her work on the award winning ethnography “The Near Northwest Side Story: Migration, Displacement, and Puerto Rican Families,” which focuses on Puerto Rican Life in Chicago and San Sebastian, Puerto Rico.

Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole and Dr. Kamela Heyward-Rotimi will be joined by Malcolm London, a Chicago resident, poet and activist at the Field Museum. They will be addressing stereotypes and myths about Africa and its 54 African nations, in addition to its diverse and dynamic people and cultures.

Come help showcase your work in anthropology to the wider public! We need you. Please sign-up now.

-Dana and Alaka
2013 AAA Annual Meeting Program Co-Chairs

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