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Webinar Wednesday with Larissa Sandy: Sex Work in Cambodia

Hello anthropology enthusiasts!  Our next webinar, with Larissa Sandy, will be the last scheduled before we take a break for the summer.  In it we’ll be exploring the struggles and livelihood of sex work in Cambodia. Before we get into Larissa’s incredible work, I’d like to take a moment to thank you all for an amazing first year of webinars.  What started out as a side project– and a chance for me to talk with some of my anthropology heroes– has evolved into a vibrant experience, and it always makes me smile to see folks tuning in to our twice a month journey into anthropology. Life can be hectic, and I appreciate that you all chose to spend your time with us. We have a great schedule for the fall leading up to the Annual Meeting in Denver this year, but for now let’s dive into Larissa’s webinar:

lsandyIt is very difficult for many people to understand sex work in Cambodia in terms other than trafficking, and so this webinar attempts to challenge and transform conventional thought and theory about sex work in non-Western modern settings like Cambodia.

In the webinar, I explore women’s pathways into sex work and highlight how this often begins with a series of constraints and choices that cannot be disconnected and which renders their identification as victims of trafficking or free agents highly problematic. The webinar shifts the focus of debate from very simplistic dichotomies by concentrating on descriptions of women’s lives rather than beginning with a priori assumptions (e.g. sex workers as victims enslaved in prostitution). I consider some of the difficulties surrounding the intersection of structural factors with subjective choices in sex workers’ everyday lives and analyse how Cambodia’s transitional economy and development plans shape sex working women’s trajectories into and experiences of sex work, and debt bondage in particular.

By exploring sex work through an anthropological lens, the webinar examines women’s involvement in the sector as part of the moral and political economies of sex work. It also discusses how sex work can be understood as a rational economic choice and a vehicle through which important social and cultural obligations fulfilled as well as reflecting on the pressing need to critically re-think the trafficking/sex slavery label.

Bio: Larissa Sandy is an anthropologist at RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia) where she lectures in the Criminology program. Her research examines sex work and women’s agency; contract labour, debt bondage and other forms of unfree labour in sex work; sex worker activism; and the global politics of sex work regulation. Before joining RMIT University, Larissa was a Vice Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in Criminology at Flinders University, where her research explored the effects of human trafficking laws and interventions for male and female sex workers in Cambodia. She is author of Women and Sex Work in Cambodia: Blood, Sweat and Tears (Routledge).

Bring your questions and curiosity, and don’t forget to register beforehand! The webinar begins 2 PM Eastern Time on May 20th, looking forward to seeing you there!

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs

Hope you all enjoyed your webinar hiatus (and Call for Papers period) because we’ve got two more amazing webinars coming your way before we break for the summer! The first, which will occur on May 6th, is hosted by Dr. Kenda R. Stewart, Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger, and Dr. David A. Katz. The second will be hosted by Dr. Larissa Sandy and will go live May 20th and will be focusing on Sex Work in Cambodia.  Both registrations are active and the password will be anthro when it’s time to join.  Larissa deserves her own blog post, so check back for that later next week.  For now, here’s a little preview of what’s coming your way May 6th:

Unanthrapologetically Working Together: Mixed Methods Collaboration and Health Services Research at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Kenda R. Stewart, PhD, David A. Katz, MD, MSc, and Heather Schacht Reisinger, PhD

In recent years the number of anthropologists employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs has exploded. In October 2013, Dr. David Atkins, the Director of VA’s Health Services Research & Development affirmed anthropologists’ contribution to health services research teams because of their expertise in understanding how culture can facilitate or impede efforts to improve health care. Using a mixed-methods smoking cessation study as an example, this webinar will explore the incorporation of anthropological methods and insights into the institutional and research structure of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Anthropologist Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger will provide an historical overview of the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE)’s Qualitative Core, housed at the Iowa City VA. Dr. Kenda Stewart, also an anthropologist, will discuss her role in conducting qualitative research on a smoking cessation intervention in collaboration with quantitative researcher, Dr. David Katz, MD, who will share his experience working with anthropologists and the advantages and challenges of incorporating anthropological methods into health services research.

Presenter bios:

Dr. Kenda R. Stewart is an anthropologist and qualitative analyst for the Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE), the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center-Central Region, and the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) Demonstration Lab located in Iowa City, IA. Currently, she is involved in multiple VA studies on topics including evaluating telehealth modalities for rural Veterans with HIV, chronic pain management, smoking cessation, primary care teams, Veteran outreach, and infertility in Veterans.

Dr. Heather Schacht Reisinger is an anthropologist and Investigator at CADRE and an Assistant Professor in the General Internal Medicine Division in the Department of Internal Medicine at University of Iowa. Currently, she is the Principle Investigator on two VA HSR&D-funded projects and has led qualitative components on several multi-site VA and non-VA studies on topics including substance abuse treatment, hypertension, MI and ACS, ICU telemedicine, and infection control.

Dr. David A. Katz is a Core Investigator in (CADRE) Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City.  He has expertise in conducting practice-based intervention research, and has an ongoing interest in the dynamics of changing clinician behavior.  He has collaborated closely with qualitative investigators in VA and NIH-funded implementation trials of smoking cessation guidelines in inpatient and outpatient practice settings.  Dr. Katz co-directs the VISN 23 Patient Aligned Care Team Demonstration Laboratory, which is conducting an ongoing assessment of the patient-centered medical home initiative within the Veterans Health Administration.

As per usual, the webinar will begin at 2 PM Eastern Time. Please register here beforehand and don’t forget the password is ‘anthro’

Bring your questions and curiosity this is going to be a great one!

Webinar Wednesday March 18: Applied Anthropology in the National Parks

As the National Park Service (NPS) approaches its centennial in 2016, the NPS Cultural Anthropology and Archeology Programs continue to engage in research with deep roots in communities across America.By partnering with universities and scholars in the CESU Network (Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units), the NPS funds applied research in ethnography and archeology.This session will introduce current, completed, and upcoming NPS-CESU research; how to submit letters of interest for research through the CESU network; and how students may become involved in applied work in parks.

Keywords: parks; applied; heritage; research; government

Links:
NPS Cultural Anthropology Program: www.nps.gov/ethnography

NPS Archeology Program: www.nps.gov/archeology

Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network: www.cesu.org

Joe Watkins is the Supervisory Cultural Anthropologist and Chief of the NPS Tribal Relations and American Cultures. He oversees the Park Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program, the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, and the Cultural Anthropology Program from the NPS Washington Area Service Office.

Stanley Bond is the Chief Archeologist for the National Park Service and Consulting Archeologist for the Department of the Interior. He has managed a number of CESU projects as a NPS Archeologist, Resource Manager, and Superintendent. Current CESU projects sponsored by the NPS Washington Archeology Program include a Southwest mission travel itinerary, a webinar lecture series, work with Latino high school students, analysis of digital imaging practices, and training for Afghan cultural heritage professionals.

Jennifer Talken-Spaulding is the Regional Cultural Anthropologist for the NPS National Capital Region. She manages multiple applied anthropology projects and a student internship program in support of national park units in three states and the District of Columbia. Research topics include contemporary communities, heritage preservation, and urban subsistence fishing.

Tom Fish is the National Coordinator for the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units (CESU) Network. Tom works across government, academia, and the NGO community to facilitate collaborative research, technical assistance, and education/capacity development in support of public trust resource stewardship. Tom’s work covers a wide range of topics relating to land use planning, marine conservation, applied social science and human dimensions, and training for protected area managers in the U.S. and abroad.

Webinar Wednesday: March 4th, 2015 with Mary Butler

March 4th, 2015: Partnering Anthropology and Evaluation:What do we gain? A presentation by Mary Butler

Mary_Butler_website_headshot

 Abstract

This webinar will look at how evaluation and anthropology can be mapped onto each other to create Evaluation Anthropology, an approach to value questions that is stronger than either approach alone for evaluations of programs that are culturally embedded. We will look at how evaluation and anthropology reinforce one another, building methods and theories in Evaluation Anthropology and how our training as anthropologists supports out work as evaluators.

1.What is Evaluation Anthropology and how do we use it?

2.The contribution of evaluation

3.The contribution of evaluation

4.Building Theory: The role of science

5.Building Methods: The role of ethnography

6.Pitfalls: Common problems with client assumptions

7.Evaluation Planning: One way to do it.

8.Mixed Methods: Synthesis of Qualitative and Quantitative Data

9.What qualifies anthropologists to do Evaluation Anthropology

10.What skills do I need to add.

Bio

Mary Odell Butler is an anthropologist-evaluator with 35 years of experience in research design, management, and supervision of evaluations and other research projects and 12 years of university teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels.She has special expertise in program evaluation, evaluation research, and case study methods and have conducted numerous projects for CDC, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and private foundations.

She is employed by Westat as a Senior Analyst supporting work in public health program evaluation.She is retired from twenty years as a Research Leader and Office Director at the Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation.She is an adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland and at the University of North Texas. In this capacity she teaches graduate courses in evaluation.Among her publications is Evaluation: A Culture Systems Approach, in press for release in summer 2015 and Creating Evaluation Anthropology: Introducing and Emerging Sub-Field (NAPA Bulletin 24, 2005)

Webinar Wednesday returns February 18, 2015 with Elizabeth Briody!

Sometimes Practice Makes Perfect: Cultural Changes in the Training of Anthropologists with Elizabeth Briody

I am proud to announce the American Anthropological Association’s webinar series is returning.  As was the case in 2014, we’ll try and alternate between webinars focused on professional and educational development, and webinars exploring more topical issues.  As part of National Anthropology Day (week?), the event is complimentary, but you will be required to register here. The event will begin at 2 PM EST, and will include a in-depth Q&A session at the end. Be sure to check your system beforehand, so you’ll be ready to go.

Elizabeth Briody_web icon

 Abstract

If you are either a faculty member or a student interested in training related to professional anthropological careers, this webinar is for you!

Interest in anthropological practice has never been higher.Students continue to seek greater job market preparation yet many faculty wonder how to help them.We will talk about:

1.Key differences between “traditional” anthropology programs and applied/practicing-oriented programs

2.Commonalities across high performing applied programs

3.Four distinct models of program effectiveness, highlighting the cultures of the University of Memphis, University of Maryland-College Park, Northern Arizona University, and the University of North Texas

4.If you are a faculty member:How do you build a program with a focus on application and practice?

5.If you are a student:How do you choose a program that will work for you?

Bio

Elizabeth K. Briody, Ph.D. is Founder and Principal of Cultural Keys LLC, a firm that helps companies and nonprofits understand and address organizational and cultural-change issues.  Briody has helped clients in many industries, including those at General Motors where she worked for 24 years.  She is currently a member of the AAA Executive Board and just completed her service as Chair of the AAA Working Group on Mentoring.

For more information on AAA webinars check out our main page: http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/conferences.cfm or email me at conferences@aaanet.org. Check out the webinar here:

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

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Dr. Karen Kelsky is the founder and principal of The Professor Is In, a blog and business dedicated to helping Ph.D.s turn their advanced degrees into jobs.  A former R1 tenured professor in Anthropology, and department head in the Humanities, Dr. Karen demystifies the unspoken rules that govern university hiring. In addition to blogging on every aspect of the job market, from building a competitive record and planning a publishing trajectory, to writing job applications, interviewing, and negotiating an offer, Dr. Karen works directly with clients on their individual job searches.  She also has a book in press with Random House, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job.   It comes out August 4, 2015.

In this webinar, I walk you through the basic expectations and potential pitfalls of the dreaded Campus Visit (sometimes called a Fly-Out) in Anthropology.There will be time for Q and A at the end, so bring questions!

We will examine:

 -The basic organization of a campus visit  -The job talk and Q and A
 -The single biggest pitfall for candidates  -The teaching demo
 -The initial arrangements and scheduling  -Handling meals gracefully
 -Preparing for the visit  -What to wear, especially in cold weather
– Meetings throughout the day

Check out the webinar here!

Webinar Wednesday: Samuel Gerald Collins and Social Network Analysis for Qualitative Research

Samuel Gerald Collins_blog  Join the American Anthropological Association tomorrow at 3 PM Eastern Time for a complimentary webinar examining Social Network Analysis.  This webinar will provide practical take-away knowledge dealing with NodeXL, a free and open source template for Microsoft® Excel® 2007, 2010 and 2013 that makes it easy to explore network graphs.  NodeXL helps bridge the gap between qualitative and quantitative analysis.  This is a must see webinar for anyone looking for a new method of data gathering, or if you feel like you could brush up on your skills.

Samuel Gerald Collins is an anthropologist at Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland.  His research examines the urban as the confluence of people and social media.  He is the author of various books, book chapters and articles, among them All Tomorrow’s Cultures: Anthropological Engagements With the Future (Berghahn, 2008), Library of Walls (2009) and, along with co-author Matthew Durington, Networked Anthropology (Routledge, 2014).  He is currently in Seoul on a Fulbright Grant.

Sign up for the webinar here: https://aaanetevents.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=aaanetevents when the event begins, you will be prompted to use the password “anthro” Be sure to run a Mic/Speaker audio test (found in the communications tab) and that your speakers are set to the right internal or external source.

Webinar Summary:

1. Terms for Social Network Analysis.

2. Using NodeXL

3. Case Study 1: Who are my interlocutors?

4. Case Study 2: Where is my field site?

5. Case Study 3: What happened to my research?

6. Additional Resources

You will not need to download NodeXL for this event, but if you are interested in checking it out beforehand, it is available here: http://nodexl.codeplex.com/

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