• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 18,304 other followers

New to Medical Anthropology Quarterly: Accepted Articles

Medical Anthropology Quarterly and Wiley Blackwell are pleased to announce the launch of “Accepted Articles.” This innovative feature allows accepted articles to be published online prior to the printed issue and aids in the widespread impact of new research. Final edited and typeset versions of record will appear in future issues of Medical Anthropology Quarterly.

“Accepted Articles” is currently available through the Wiley Online Library. For AnthroSource users, “Accepted Articles” can be accessed by clicking on the “HTML Version and More Information” button. The feature will be available directly on AnthroSource after the platform relaunches in spring 2015. Current “Accepted Articles” feature:

Neoliberal Justice and the Transformation of the Moral: The Privatization of the Right to Health Care in Colombia
César Ernesto Abadía-Barrero

“I Don’t Know the Words He Uses”: Therapeutic Communication among Q’eqchi Maya Healers and Their Patients
James B. Waldram

Insurance Accounts: The Cultural Logics of Health Care Financing
Jessica Mulligan

Is There a Role for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Preventive and Promotive Health? An Anthropological Assessment in the Context of U.S. Health Reform
Jennifer Jo Thompson and Mark Nichter

Communicating “Evidence”: Lifestyle, Cancer and the Promise of a Disease-free Future
Kirsten Bell and Svetlana Ristovski-Slijepcevic

Login to the Wiley Online Library or AnthroSource to access Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Users can then access “Accepted Articles.”

Webinar Wednesday: Samuel Gerald Collins and Social Network Analysis for Qualitative Research

Samuel Gerald Collins_blog  Join the American Anthropological Association tomorrow at 3 PM Eastern Time for a complimentary webinar examining Social Network Analysis.  This webinar will provide practical take-away knowledge dealing with NodeXL, a free and open source template for Microsoft® Excel® 2007, 2010 and 2013 that makes it easy to explore network graphs.  NodeXL helps bridge the gap between qualitative and quantitative analysis.  This is a must see webinar for anyone looking for a new method of data gathering, or if you feel like you could brush up on your skills.

Samuel Gerald Collins is an anthropologist at Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland.  His research examines the urban as the confluence of people and social media.  He is the author of various books, book chapters and articles, among them All Tomorrow’s Cultures: Anthropological Engagements With the Future (Berghahn, 2008), Library of Walls (2009) and, along with co-author Matthew Durington, Networked Anthropology (Routledge, 2014).  He is currently in Seoul on a Fulbright Grant.

Sign up for the webinar here: https://aaanetevents.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=aaanetevents when the event begins, you will be prompted to use the password “anthro” Be sure to run a Mic/Speaker audio test (found in the communications tab) and that your speakers are set to the right internal or external source.

Webinar Summary:

1. Terms for Social Network Analysis.

2. Using NodeXL

3. Case Study 1: Who are my interlocutors?

4. Case Study 2: Where is my field site?

5. Case Study 3: What happened to my research?

6. Additional Resources

You will not need to download NodeXL for this event, but if you are interested in checking it out beforehand, it is available here: http://nodexl.codeplex.com/

Early workshops registration ends soon, so register now for workshops!

Today’s guest blog post is by Dr. Sabrina Nichelle Scott. Dr. Scott is a consumer anthropologist, and she is the Chair of the NAPA Workshops Committee.

113th AAA Annual MeetingWorkshops registration is now available. Unlike last year, workshops begin on the first day of the AAA Annual Meeting on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 and end on Saturday, December 7, 2014. It is exciting to have the opportunity to choose from over 40 workshops from various sections within AAA with 12 of those workshops offered by the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology (NAPA). Complete workshop descriptions and convenient online registration are available at http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/Workshops.cfm. Early workshops registration ends soon, so register now to guarantee your seat. I look forward to seeing you in DC!

Call for Papers – Special Issue: Campus Sustainability & Social Sciences

Today’s guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education – Universities and colleges have been among the leading places where sustainability is promoted on campus and beyond. The social sciences can offer a variety of valuable insights into how to enhance a broad range of these efforts at higher education institutions: from supporting recycling, waste reduction, water and energy conservation, renewable energy and alternative transportation use, sustainable food procurement, and green building construction to fostering a sustainability culture. This special issue aims to present contemporary, state-of-the-art applications of how social science theories, models, and findings can help overcome campus sustainability challenges – and – to illustrate the diversity of social science campus sustainability research conducted across the world.
Papers are sought from a range of social sciences including but not limited to anthropology, communication, economics, education, geography, psychology, political science, and sociology. Interdisciplinary social science contributions are welcome as well. Manuscripts may consist of:

  • Research syntheses of a particular campus sustainability challenge from the perspective of single or multiple social science disciplines.
  • Conceptual and theoretical frameworks illustrating how individual or multiple social science disciplines can contribute to enhancing campus sustainability.
  • Empirical campus sustainability research based on quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods, addressing and illustrating the benefits of drawing on the social sciences.
  • Evaluations of campus sustainability programs based on social science research.
  • Case studies of campus sustainability programs examined through the lens of a single or multiple social science disciplines.

Information and Instructions for submissions: Prospective authors should submit an abstract of around 500 words, outlining the proposed manuscript, directly to the guest editor (zintmich@umich.edu) by 15th November 2014.

 

Webinar Wednesday: Sibel Kusimba, Mobile Economies

October 15, 2014: Mobile Economies

Kusimba

In September 2014 Apple unveiled its new iPhone 6, which also features Apple Pay, a mobile payment system. Although mobile payments have been slow to take off in the United States and other countries, they are extremely popular in Kenya, where billions of dollars are transacted by almost 20 million account holders.  Development economists hope that mobile money will be a part of a new “cash-light” future, bringing the benefits of financial inclusion to millions in developing settings.

The webinar takes an anthropological view of mobile money in Western Kenya as a form of communication, shaped by local cultures of friendship and kinship, and by the direct and often private connections that mobile phones allow. I use social network analysis to examine features such as reciprocity, centrality, and brokerage in the social networks of mobile money. This webinar will engage us in a conversation about the use of mobile phones cross culturally, and about how we can use new methods to understand the cultural and social impact of mobile phones.

Sibel Kusimba is an anthropologist in residence at American University.  She has been conducting anthropological fieldwork in Kenya since 1993.  Her initial research interests were in Paleolithic, protohistoric and recent hunter-gatherers; her 2003 book, African Foragers, was named an outstanding academic book by the American Library Association.  Since living through the mobile phone revolution in Africa, her interests have turned to the social and cultural impact of mobile phone communication, in particular the use of mobile money.  For two field seasons she has traced the social networks of mobile money in families and communities, sponsored by the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion at the University of California at Irvine.

The event is complimentary, and you can register here. When it’s time to join in, the attendee password will be “anthro” and be sure to add the event to your calendar to stay up to date:

New Resource: Course Conversations Assignment for all Faculty

This guest blog post is by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

Utilize this teaching activity that engages students and is easily integrated as an assignment into a wide variety of courses. It emphasizes civil discourse skills across political and cultural perspectives and focuses on the topic of sustainable energy (i.e. energy efficiency and renewable energies). The Course Conversations activity is applicable to all academic disciplines, is geared for both undergraduate and graduate students, and can be assigned in both large and small classes. Students act as co-hosts to the conversation. Conversations begin by understanding ground rules for civil discourse before the actual topic is discussed. Conversations can result in civic engagement opportunities where students communicate to decision makers their findings/conclusions regarding the benefits/potentials of energy efficiency and renewable energies. Course Conversations includes all materials needed to utilize this assignment in your course and provides an easy and automated set-up for grading and assessment. It has been featured at Harvard as a quality learning experience.

For Course Conversations teaching tools and resources see the following link: http://www.livingroomconversations.org/campus-conversations/

For more information, contact Debra Rowe at dgrowe@oaklandcc.edu or campusenergyconversations@gmail.com

 

Civil Discourse and Civic Engagement with Planet Education – Course Activities for all Disciplines

Free Webinar and Networking Event by Disciplinary Associations Network for Sustainability 

Plan to participate October 16th in a networking and learning opportunity focused on empowering faculty, students, staff, and communities through applied learning. The online gathering will feature learning activities that can be used in any course to help students engage more in their learning via civil discourse and taking actions for a better world. Speakers will describe national initiatives to engage students and the community in clean energy options, climate destabilization solutions, and making connections across the political spectrum. Sponsored by the Higher Education Associations Sustainability Consortium (HEASC).

Time: 3pm to 4:30 pm EST on October 16, 2014. Register today at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/847362234

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 18,304 other followers