• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 18,396 other followers

Making More Connections at Your Annual Meeting

Today’s guest blog post is written by Guven Peter Witteveen.

Conferences normally have consisted of formal sessions, informal shoptalk, and hatching ideas with a mix of well-known and new colleagues. The events last a few days and then the momentum fades a few days later when the catch up work at home faces you. With a view to extending the period of conference enthusiasm and contagious ideas, this year in keeping with the “Producing Anthropology” theme we would like to encourage presenters, attendees, and those unable to be physically present to share part of their work for a few days before the Annual Meeting, during events, and a few weeks after the conference. That way it will be possible to interact with the authors, ideas, and source materials beyond the face to face time of a given session.

Online services make it easy to share your presentation, abstract, bibliography and resource links, draft writings [marked not for citation], images and video or audio clips. The idea underlying this online initiative is for you to be in charge of your own material in full or in abbreviated form at a hosting place of your choosing (personal account, workplace webspace, or one of the free online services -see a summary of several usefully scholarly services at http://bit.ly/2013tools). Then you submit a link to that sharable material at a single, one-stop input form so that anyone can browse the resulting list of authors’ links and choose to interact with the thinkers and materials of their choosing.

Ultimately the authors of the materials who have uploaded their things will control how long the files are viewable, but the one-stop list of this Annual Meeting’s materials makes a simple way to centralize things. This project to gather links to your materials is not an archive. There is no permanence. That would be a job for archive.org. Instead this online page is intended to streamline the sharing of presented subjects and related materials in the run-up to the Annual Meeting and for a few weeks following the event.

So no matter if you are scheduled to present a numbered scientific session, speak at a round-table, create a poster session, or attend a section event on-site or off-site, please feel free to share your materials by uploading to a place of your choosing and then giving the link to the material at http://tinyurl.com/2014aaalinks or view the cumulative results submitted in the days to come at http://goo.gl/4Q6OZE.

Guven Witteveen belongs to Society for East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) and works with colleagues to produce more and better outreach beyond campus. Some of his work is linked from www.linkedin.com/in/anthroview.

Over 300 Anthropologists Oppose a Boycott of Israeli Academic Institutions

Today’s guest blog post is written by AAA member, David M. Rosen (rosen@fdu.edu).

More than 300 anthropologists have now signed a statement strongly opposing efforts by the political organization Boycott, Divest and Sanction (BDS) and it supporters within the American Anthropological Association to organize a boycott of Israeli academic institutions (http://anthroantiboycott.wordpress.com). The goal of the boycott is to sever all ties between members of the American Anthropological Association and Israeli anthropologists, many of whom are also members of the AAA. A boycott will severely damage professional anthropological life, scholarly interchange, free speech, and free association. The boycott effort damages the American Anthropological Association by giving a partisan political issue center stage at the annual meetings. Finally, a boycott will create a discriminatory and hostile environment against Israeli anthropologists and anthropologists working in Israel, and a rift with many members of the American Anthropological Association who refuse to become collaborators in this process.

Boycott supporters offer a strange and dangerous theory of vicarious complicity to bolster their arguments. Israeli academic institutions, they assert, must be punished because, as institutions, they have not adopted public positions against Israeli government actions and policies with respect to the occupation of Palestinian lands. But no such idea of second- hand complicity has ever been applied to any other academic institutions. Many BDS supporters themselves come from universities that never took official positions against the wars in Vietnam, Iraq, or Afghanistan. Indeed, many come from state universities that were major recipients of defense funding at the time that thousands of innocents were killed by US forces. Furthermore, when the American Anthropological Association voted to boycott the state of Arizona over its immigration laws, it did not target Arizona public universities and our colleagues in Arizona because Arizona universities did not take a public stand against such laws. We did not treat such universities as complicit simply because they did not act against state government actions and continued to accept funding from the state of Arizona.

Indeed, many Israeli academics, in their work within and beyond the university, are leaders in advocating peace, non-violence and the end of the Occupation. Our unique skills as anthropologists lie in examining and challenging the taken-for-granted while suggesting new perspectives and previously unimagined ways to subvert the violence of the status quo. We urge all anthropologists to consider the manifold ways in which anthropology and anthropologists might move forward in the search for justice and in striving for peace in Israel/Palestine. Boycotting and demonizing Israeli academic institutions and our Israeli colleagues is not one of them, and is in fact, counterproductive. We urge our colleagues to join the thousands of others in organizations such as the American Association of University Professors and Modern Language Association in wholly rejecting boycotts of academic institutions. Such boycotts are subversions of the academic freedoms and values. necessary to the free flow of idea in the anthropological community. Anthropologists interested in signing this statement can go directly to the petition at http://anthroantiboycott.wordpress.com/sign-the-statement or forward an email with your name and academic affiliation to anthro.anti.boycott@gmail.com.

Format for December 4th Members’ Open Forum on Engagement with Israel and Palestine

Today’s guest blog post is written by Ed Liebow, Executive Director.

Last July’s Anthropology News mentioned a variety of ways in which AAA leadership is trying to foster dialogue and information exchange among AAA members on anthropologically relevant issues related to Israel/Palestine. We mentioned there that an Open Forum would be held at the Annual Meeting; it has now been scheduled for Thursday 4 December, from 13:00 to 14:15 in the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Ballroom Salon 2. Our goal is to facilitate dialogue among AAA Members, bringing to bear on the conversation the culture of inquiry and analytical skills characteristic of our profession.

The frame for the discussion is: what issues related to Israel/Palestine are relevant to us as anthropologists, as members of a scholarly association, and to the AAA as an association of anthropologists?

Here is what you can expect at the Open Forum. The hall will be arranged with a number of tables; the hall is large and we can accommodate many small groups. You will be encouraged to sit with people you do not already know well. There will be introductory remarks from Monica Heller, the AAA President, a brief update on the work of the AAA Task Force on Engagement on Issues related to Israel/Palestine by the Task Force chair, AAA Past-President Don Brenneis, and a short explanation of the forum’s format by our lead facilitator, Tarek Maassarani. The process will include an opening round to build trust and familiarity amongst participants; several discussion rounds with prompts to share what questions, knowledge, perspectives, and experiences participants bring to the table; and a reflective closing round to share insights and their relevance beyond this one event.

Participants will also be given index cards that they can place in feedback boxes as they leave the room. Facilitators will be asked to fill out a reflection form immediately following the dialogue to help us better understand what happened at each table. If there is time, we might be able to hear from some of the facilitators before we need to vacate the room. Since the objective at this stage is to foster dialogue among members, we will check badges at the entrance. Executive Board members, Task Force members, Section Assembly leadership and AAA staff will likely attend as observers. We will ask the press to respect our privacy during the Forum, though we are happy for participants to speak to the press (or blog or tweet) before and after the event. We are also open to considering further such events, whether open only to members or not.

AAA 2014 Annual Photo Contest Voting Period Ending Tonight

Hello all! The photo contest voting period is coming to an end tonight at midnight (Eastern Time). Get your votes in now.  We will than proceed to the staff voting and production phase to produce the calendar.

If you do not wish to use Facebook for voting, please email photos@aaanet.org, no votes will be counted which have been submitted after midnight (Eastern Time) tonight.

I want to thank all the amazing photographers who have submitted this year.  We got more submission and votes this year than any previous year, each provoking and imaginative.  Thanks to your votes we will be narrowing down the photographs until we have 12 for our calendar (Ideally 4 from each of the categories). Then we will be producing the calendar, which will be given out at the annual meeting, or by request after the annual meeting.

If you are one of the photographers selected for the calendar, please email photos@aaanet.org, so we can send you the desired number of calendars.  There is a limited amount being produced this year, so please request early!

New to Medical Anthropology Quarterly: Accepted Articles

Medical Anthropology Quarterly and Wiley Blackwell are pleased to announce the launch of “Accepted Articles.” This innovative feature allows accepted articles to be published online prior to the printed issue and aids in the widespread impact of new research. Final edited and typeset versions of record will appear in future issues of Medical Anthropology Quarterly.

“Accepted Articles” is currently available through the Wiley Online Library. For AnthroSource users, “Accepted Articles” can be accessed by clicking on the “HTML Version and More Information” button. The feature will be available directly on AnthroSource after the platform relaunches in spring 2015. Current “Accepted Articles” feature:

Neoliberal Justice and the Transformation of the Moral: The Privatization of the Right to Health Care in Colombia
César Ernesto Abadía-Barrero

“I Don’t Know the Words He Uses”: Therapeutic Communication among Q’eqchi Maya Healers and Their Patients
James B. Waldram

Insurance Accounts: The Cultural Logics of Health Care Financing
Jessica Mulligan

Is There a Role for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Preventive and Promotive Health? An Anthropological Assessment in the Context of U.S. Health Reform
Jennifer Jo Thompson and Mark Nichter

Communicating “Evidence”: Lifestyle, Cancer and the Promise of a Disease-free Future
Kirsten Bell and Svetlana Ristovski-Slijepcevic

Login to the Wiley Online Library or AnthroSource to access Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Users can then access “Accepted Articles.”

Webinar Wednesday: Samuel Gerald Collins and Social Network Analysis for Qualitative Research

Samuel Gerald Collins_blog  Join the American Anthropological Association tomorrow at 3 PM Eastern Time for a complimentary webinar examining Social Network Analysis.  This webinar will provide practical take-away knowledge dealing with NodeXL, a free and open source template for Microsoft® Excel® 2007, 2010 and 2013 that makes it easy to explore network graphs.  NodeXL helps bridge the gap between qualitative and quantitative analysis.  This is a must see webinar for anyone looking for a new method of data gathering, or if you feel like you could brush up on your skills.

Samuel Gerald Collins is an anthropologist at Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland.  His research examines the urban as the confluence of people and social media.  He is the author of various books, book chapters and articles, among them All Tomorrow’s Cultures: Anthropological Engagements With the Future (Berghahn, 2008), Library of Walls (2009) and, along with co-author Matthew Durington, Networked Anthropology (Routledge, 2014).  He is currently in Seoul on a Fulbright Grant.

Sign up for the webinar here: https://aaanetevents.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=aaanetevents when the event begins, you will be prompted to use the password “anthro” Be sure to run a Mic/Speaker audio test (found in the communications tab) and that your speakers are set to the right internal or external source.

Webinar Summary:

1. Terms for Social Network Analysis.

2. Using NodeXL

3. Case Study 1: Who are my interlocutors?

4. Case Study 2: Where is my field site?

5. Case Study 3: What happened to my research?

6. Additional Resources

You will not need to download NodeXL for this event, but if you are interested in checking it out beforehand, it is available here: http://nodexl.codeplex.com/

Early workshops registration ends soon, so register now for workshops!

Today’s guest blog post is by Dr. Sabrina Nichelle Scott. Dr. Scott is a consumer anthropologist, and she is the Chair of the NAPA Workshops Committee.

113th AAA Annual MeetingWorkshops registration is now available. Unlike last year, workshops begin on the first day of the AAA Annual Meeting on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 and end on Saturday, December 7, 2014. It is exciting to have the opportunity to choose from over 40 workshops from various sections within AAA with 12 of those workshops offered by the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology (NAPA). Complete workshop descriptions and convenient online registration are available at http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/Workshops.cfm. Early workshops registration ends soon, so register now to guarantee your seat. I look forward to seeing you in DC!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 18,396 other followers