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Know Before You Vote – Resolution on Contingent and Part-Time Academic Labor

A special message from AAA Secretary, Dr. Margaret Buckner:

At the November 2013 business meeting in Chicago, the Committee on Labor Relations submitted a resolution on contingent and part-time academic labor.  Though it was unanimously approved, there wasn’t a quorum at the meeting, so, in accordance with AAA bylaws, the resolution went to the Executive Board.  The EB in turn agreed to place the resolution on this year’s ballot for a vote of the full membership.  This blog is an opportunity for AAA members to speak for or against the resolution before the elections, which open on April 15.

View and leave your comments of the Resolution today. The Resolution will be available for comment until March 31st.

AAA President-elect Distinguishably Honored By Students

AWaterstonPhoto02.2014Named the 2014 Distinguished Faculty by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Alumni Association, Dr. Alisse Waterston will be honored during the annual Alumni Reunion in April. Dr. Waterston, a professor in the Department of Anthropology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice since 2003, is a cultural anthropologist who studies the human consequences of structural and systematic violence and inequality. She is the American Anthropological Association’s President-elect and Editor of the Association’s newest digital publication, Open Anthropology. Dr. Waterston is a Soros International Scholar affiliated with the Gender Studies Department, Tbilisi State University, Republic of Georgia. And she is the author of My Father’s Wars: Migration, Memory and the Violence of a Century, an intimate ethnography in the Routledge Series of Innovative Ethnographies.

AAA Student Summer Internship – Applications due 3/15

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to offer two internship opportunities funded by member donations.

Internships are six weeks in length from June 30 through August 8, 2014.  Internships are unpaid however; interns will be provided housing and a meal/travel stipend.

Interns will spend approximately 40 percent of their time working onsite at the AAA offices in Arlington, Virginia, and the other 60 percent of their time working on-site at one of three locations described below.

Eligibility:

  • Undergraduate students in their junior or senior year
  • First Year Graduate students (completing the first year of graduate work by June 2013)

Visit the AAA Summer Internship Program webpage for the application. Application deadline is March 15, 2014.

Click here to support this Internship Program through a financial contribution.

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Calling all Discussion Groups and Anthropology Clubs: Let’s Talk About the March Issue of Open Anthropology!

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Has the new issue of Open Anthropology, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care, piqued your interest in anthropological understandings of health, illness, medicine, and health care? Are you interested in building the conversation on your campus or in your community? Throughout March and April, AAA is encouraging anthropology clubs and discussion groups to explore, debate and analyze contemporary issues of health, illness, medicine and health care based on the material included in the March issue of Open Anthropology.

We’d then like to hear from you! Send us stories, videos, and/or photographs that highlight and illustrate the depth, liveliness and creativity of your discussion. Two submissions will be selected to be featured on the AAA blog in May.

Jump start your conversations using these questions:

  • In what ways does the idea of the “social life of” health, illness, medicine and health care that frames the specific articles in this issue of Open Anthropology, offer a way to shift public conversations on these issues?
  • How can anthropology help identify omissions in policy and public conversations regarding health and health care?
  • In current public conversations and contemporary policy debates on health, illness, medicine and health care, how are inequality and violence engaged with- or ignored? Using these articles, how can anthropologists use ethnography to shed light on inequality and violence?
  • How have these articles intersected with your own research and/or research interests?
  • How are anthropologists across the four fields of anthropology writing about the social life of health, illness, medicine and health care? Beyond the articles presented in this issue of Open Anthropology, what additional research, theories and concepts will help us illuminate our views of health, illness, medicine and  health care?

Please submit your stories and/or photographs to Jennie at jsimpson@aaanet.org by April 30th. We look forward to your submissions!

Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Save the date for Webinar Wednesdays!

In 2014, the American Anthropological Association hosts a monthly webinar series on the third Wednesday of the month on a variety of topics to engage anthropologists.

Mark-Aldenderfer_2On March 19, 2014 at 2pm ET, AAA will host a webinar event with Dr. Mark Aldenderfer on the topic of The Bar is Very High:Academic Dossier Evaluation and What to Expect. The webinar will be of particular interest to anthropology graduate students, recent PhDs, as well as AAA Section Leadership and volunteers. The program will cover topics such as:

  • Crafting tenure dossiers and the importance of publishing records (including online publishing)
  • The realities of what PhDs can expect during the tenure evaluation process and being prepared
  • Department culture and the expectations of deans, chairs, admins and colleagues

Mark S. Aldenderfer is an American anthropologist and archaeologist. He is the Dean of the School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts at the University of California, Merced. He has served as Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, and the University of California, Santa Barbara.  Aldenderfer received his Ph.D. from Penn State University in 1977. He is known in particular for his comparative research into high-altitude adaptation and for contributions to quantitative methods in archaeology. He has also served as editor of several journals in anthropology and archaeology.

This webinar is free but registration is required.

Take a #StandForScience

The FIRST Act, introduced on Monday by Representative Larry Buschon (R-IN), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Research of the larger House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, fails to properly fund social science work at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and widens the nation’s innovation deficit. The FIRST Act would impede the mission of NSF and the nation’s research portfolio. Among other items, the bill:

1. Completely fails to meet the standards for science research and innovation that were set in the former version of the authorizing legislation, commonly referred to as the COMPETES Act;

2. Sets funding targets for for NSF and NIST that are not adequate to fund basic research; and

3. Includes a funding cut for the the Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE), the division of the NSF that is primarily responsible for funding anthropological research.

Help AAA #StandForScience by contacting your congressional representative to request full restoration of NSF’s authorized levels or vote NO to the FIRST Act (#VoteNoHR4186). Please use the Twitter hastags to voice your opinion as well.

To read a press release issued by the American Association Universities, click here. For a copy of the FIRST Act, click here.

If you would like more information about contacting your Member of Congress, or about the FIRST Act, please contact Damon Dozier, AAA Director of Public Affairs at ddozier@aaanet.org.

2014 Leadership Fellows Program

AAA is accepting applications to the 2014 Leadership Fellows Program. This program provides a unique opportunity for anthropologists early in their careers to learn about leadership opportunities within the association.  Each year a group of three to five fellows is paired with a mentor chosen from among AAA leadership.  Mentors are available to fellows throughout the year to answer questions related to AAA.  Fellows shadow their mentors at the AAA Annual Meeting in meetings of the Executive Board, Association Committees, and Section Committees. In addition, fellows are invited to attend the AAA Donors Reception and a Leadership Fellows Social bringing together past and present cohorts of fellows.

Past Fellows have told us that their experience in the program “demystified the decision-making processes,” “fostered a strong network for me of young anthropologists,” and “gave me a better sense as to how to manage the AAA meetings.” Many go on to assume leadership roles in sections and committees after their term as a Fellow. According to Rebecca Galemba (U Denver), 2012 Leadership Fellow, had she not participated in the Leadership Fellows Program, she might not have had the courage to apply for undesignated seat on the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology. Heide Castañeda (U South Florida), 2011 Leadership Fellow, credits the Leadership Fellows Program with helping her achieve tenure by bringing visibility to her interest in service and leadership within the larger discipline of anthropology.

Learn more about the benefits of the Leadership Fellows Program and submit your application online. Applications must be submitted by March 15.

All questions should be directed to Courtney Dowdall (cdowdall@aaanet.org).

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