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AAA Summer Internship Applications Available Feb. 6

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to offer two internship opportunities funded by member donations.

Internships are six weeks in length during the summer of 2015. Internships are unpaid however; interns will be provided housing and a meal/travel stipend.
Interns will spend approximately 40 percent of their time working onsite at the AAA offices in Arlington, VA, and the other 60 percent of their time working on-site at one of two locations described below.

Eligibility:
• Undergraduate students in their junior or senior year
• First Year Graduate students (completing the first year of graduate work by June 2014)

Applications will be accepted beginning on February 6, 2015.

Visit the AAA Summer Internship Program webpage for the application. Applications will be available on February 6, 2015. Application deadline is March 15, 2015.

Click here to support this Internship Program through a financial contribution.

Naval History & Heritage Command (NHHC) Internship
The Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) of the Naval History & Heritage Command (NHHC), the official history program of the Department of the Navy, is located at Washington’s historical Navy Yard. The office serves four main functions:

• Cultural Resource Management, Historic Preservation & Policy Development – Resource management involves implementing an overall cultural heritage policy, ensuring Navy remains in compliance with federal laws and regulations, forming a sunken military craft inventory, crafting individual site management plans, coordinating violation enforcement, coordinating human remains issues, and extensive collaboration with federal, state, local agencies, international counterparts, the non-profit sector, the private sector and the public to best manage sunken military craft.

• Archaeological & Historical Research – Intrinsically tied to the management of sunken military craft are the inventory, survey, assessment, documentation, research and monitoring of these ship and aircraft wrecks. NHHC undertakes archaeological research as a lead agency, as a collaborator, as a guide, and as a monitor and permit-issuer in the case of external archaeological surveys and/or actions that disturb sunken military craft.

• Artifact Conservation & Curation – All historic artifacts recovered from an underwater environment require some form of conservation and a proper curation environment to remain in a stable condition. NHHC, via its Archaeology & Conservation Laboratory, is directly responsible for nearly 14,000 artifacts originating from sunken military craft.

• Education, Public Relations & Information Dissemination – Public education and outreach is a fundamental mission component of NHHC as it helps promote the Navy’s heritage and preserve its sunken military craft from disturbance. Information dissemination occurs through channels such as publications, presentations, lectures, a web and social media presence, and press coverage is pursued on a regular basis.

Interns can expect to work on a variety of tasks depending on their research interests and office priorities, such as: preparing, undertaking, or following up on field investigations; conducting archaeological and historical research; reviewing, editing or preparing reports; synthesizing information and preparing policy or case study briefings; conserving artifacts; assisting with the UAB artifact inventory, management, and loan programs; coordinating partner and inter-agency correspondence; and participating in public outreach and education initiatives such as tours, lectures, presentations, and web presence.

National Museum of African Art Internship
The National Museum of African Art has the largest publicly held collection of traditional and contemporary African art in the United States. This collection includes more than 9,000 objects representing nearly every country in Africa dating from ancient to contemporary times, and includes sculpture, textiles, pottery, jewelry, photography, paintings, works on paper, and video art.

The museum’s mission is to foster the discovery and appreciation of the visual arts of Africa, the cradle of humanity.

The selected intern would be placed in the museum’s curatorial department, and their assignment would include object-based work related to a future exhibition.

An interest in African culture and art is required for this internship, as well as a background in curatorial practice and procedures.

AAA On-Site Activities
AAA activities will include the following:
• Research membership trends in the AAA; developing and drafting materials for 2016 National Anthropology Day; drafting text for Anthropology News (AN) newsletter articles and other activities as assigned.

Exclusive Programs & Discounts for Members Only

We are excited to start the New Year off with several exclusive member-only programs and discounts. In an effort to continue to provide future anthropologists with access to practical knowledge, we partnered with UMB Bank to offer a AAA Visa credit card. 100% of all royalties will support the AAA Intern Program which offers two undergraduate students the opportunity to participate in a six week program.

We are continuing our partnership with Mercer (formerly Marsh) to provide access to health, life, and dental insurance. Members will additionally begin to have discounted access to home and auto insurance through Liberty Mutual. Additional savings for travel and office supplies are accessible through Avis, Budget and Office Depot, respectively.

Learn More>>

 

AAA Credit Card
 Visa  100% of all royalties supports the AAA Intern Program.
Health, Life & Dental Insurance
 Mercer  Access Life Insurance,
Health Care,
Accidental Death & Dismemberment,
Long Term Care,
Disability Income,
Dental,
and Cancer Insurance
Auto & Home Insurance
 Liberty Mutual Receive special discounted
rate on Auto and Home Insurance.
Coming Soon!
Travel
 Avis Save up to 25% on your
next car rental.
 Budget Save up to 25% on your
next rental car. 
Office Supplies
office depot Save up to 80% at Office Depot, in-store or online.
FREE next day delivery on orders over $50!

AAA & CASCA To Hold Joint Conference in 2019

The American Anthropological Association is pleased to announce that together with CASCA (Canadian Anthropology Society/Société canadienne d’anthropologie), we will hold a joint conference November 20-24, 2019, in Vancouver, British Columbia. This conference will allow for the development of multiple forms of collaboration between the two associations. We are grateful to the joint committee whose work was critical to the getting the conference off the ground. Conference details forthcoming.

La CASCA (Canadian Anthropology Society/Société canadienne d’anthropologie) et la AAA (American Anthropological Association) tiendront un colloque commun à Vancouver (C.-B.) du 20 au 24 novembre, 2019. Ce colloque permettra de multiplier les possibilités de collaboration entre les deux associations. Nous remercions le comité conjoint qui nous a permis de le mettre sur pied. L’appel sera diffusé selon le calendrier habituel.

AAA Statement on Police Practices

AAA President Monica Heller releases public statement on police practices in the United States and calls upon anthropologists to help create equitable policing:

In the United States, too many black Americans are killed by officers of the law. As anthropologists, we must speak out whenever our common humanity gives way to discrimination, prejudice and violence. We must speak out whenever anyone acts in ways that accords the full rights of personhood to some but not all. In this case, these injustices are perpetrated by those who are trained to protect us all, requiring a radical re-examination of the processes and structures that produce these tragedies on a regular basis.

Anthropologists can, and do, contribute to this re-examination by showing how structural inequality makes racism and race-based violence commonplace, whether it is motivated by individuals’ conscious intent or not, and in particular how officers of the law come to perpetrate such violence. It is time now to join with others to undo that process. Because it stops today.

Department of Hispanic Studies Trinitiy College Dublin University: Pulling together or Pulling Apart (Call for Papers)

DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC STUDIES
TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY

PULLING TOGETHER OR PULLING APART

IDENTITY AND NATIONHOOD • SPAIN, EUROPE,
THE WEST

25 – 27 June 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

Increasing globalisation highlights the need to revisit the upsurge of Nationalism, and this three-day interdisciplinary conference will provide a forum for debate on sovereignty, nationhood, identity, and interrelated issues in Catalonia, the Basque Country, Galicia, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Belgium, France, Quebec, and elsewhere. Questions will include: why nationalism is so resilient; how notions of ‘self’ and ‘nation’ interpenetrate; economic, human rights, and social justice conflicts; whether and to what extent new definitions and approaches to nationhood and state may be needed in the context of a valid ‘European’ identity in the 21st century.
We invite papers on topics related to the main themes of the conference, to include perspectives on sovereign rights of nations • challenges of micro- and macro-nationalism to the supranational objective of creating a European identity • comparative approaches (historical, media, linguistic, philosophical, gender, anthropological, ethnographic, religious, socio-political…) • cultural rights and public space • radical and moderate nationalisms • territorial, political, and racial constructions of collective national identity • conflict resolution • myth and the nation • the arts in the construction of national identity • narratives of the front lines• forgiveness and reconciliation • other relevant topics.

Proposals (circa 250 words) in English or Spanish, together with a brief biographical note, should reach the conference organizers, Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer and Dr Nicola Rooney (confhisp@tcd.ie), by 12 February 2015. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Proposals from young researchers and postgraduate students are welcome. Acceptances will be notified by 27 March 2015.

For possible publication, revised versions should be sent for peer-review to confhisp@tcd.ie to arrive not later than 15 September 2015.

Further information (registration, accommodation, round-tables, events, etc.) will be available by mid-January on the conference website: http://www.tcd.ie/Hispanic_Studies/PTPA-conference/

A note from the American Anthropological Association: the AAA is not directly connected to the organization, vetting, or implementation of this conference.

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

karen

Dr. Karen Kelsky is the founder and principal of The Professor Is In, a blog and business dedicated to helping Ph.D.s turn their advanced degrees into jobs.  A former R1 tenured professor in Anthropology, and department head in the Humanities, Dr. Karen demystifies the unspoken rules that govern university hiring. In addition to blogging on every aspect of the job market, from building a competitive record and planning a publishing trajectory, to writing job applications, interviewing, and negotiating an offer, Dr. Karen works directly with clients on their individual job searches.  She also has a book in press with Random House, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job.   It comes out August 4, 2015.

In this webinar, I walk you through the basic expectations and potential pitfalls of the dreaded Campus Visit (sometimes called a Fly-Out) in Anthropology.There will be time for Q and A at the end, so bring questions!

We will examine:

 -The basic organization of a campus visit  -The job talk and Q and A
 -The single biggest pitfall for candidates  -The teaching demo
 -The initial arrangements and scheduling  -Handling meals gracefully
 -Preparing for the visit  -What to wear, especially in cold weather
– Meetings throughout the day

Check out the webinar here!

“Why I signed” (the petition for academic boycott of Israeli institutions)

Guest blog post by AAA member,  Steven Caton (Harvard U).

I have not been a fan of boycotts in the past, so why did I change my mind?

The Gaza war in June and the continuing settlement finally made me reconsider. All the hand wringing over the Palestinians and pronouncements critical of Israel and its policies were doing absolutely no good. I spoke to a number of colleagues and friends, two of them Israeli, and two of them not (no Palestinians I regret to say) about the pros and cons of the proposed boycott, and after contemplating what they said for several weeks, I finally decided to sign. In other words, I did not take this action lightly. I have thought longer and harder than ever about questions of academic freedom that boycotts raise, and whether it’s impossible to distinguish between boycotting institutions and individual scholars, as it is claimed by boycott opponents.

Let me try to tackle the issue of academic freedom first. Opponents of the boycott argue that the freedoms of individual academics will be jeopardized, Israeli, Palestinian, and even scholars like myself who might “self-censure” by not publishing in journals supported by Israeli academic institutions, and that the boycott will not only be counter-productive but wrong in principle. It’s hard for me to buy this argument, when the range of academic journals, publishers and internet sites are so numerous and various as to make it possible to communicate one’s research outside the boycotted venues. A more reasonable concern is whether by not attending Israeli conferences or not teaching in Israeli classrooms, one is weakening these institutions to the point where they will see a cut-back in support for, say, anthropology, and thus do damage to the discipline inside the country as well as to individual anthropologists working in these institutions who are critical of Israel’s policy towards Palestinians and other marginalized groups within the country. Or conversely, that I am denying the possibility of my own speaking out within Israel against Israel’s policies and the university system that supports them. Let’s face it, even if we were given the chance to make that point or debate it, it would be dismissed as a personal view. I’d rather forego the opportunity to debate the issues within Israel, where these things tend to get coopted or marginalized in any case, and align with my colleagues in condemning what I think is unjust, which I think is a much more powerful tactic.

Speaking more abstractly, there is the “infra-structural” or “material” argument that says academic freedom is dependent on certain conditions being operative, and of course I have to acknowledge the merits of this argument in that Palestinian scholars are being deprived of the material infra-structure they need to exercise their academic freedoms within Israel. Am I therefore being illogical by arguing that two wrongs make a right? That if Palestinians are being denied their academic freedom, then so should Israelis and others working in Israeli institutions?
The answer to that question gets to the other, whether it is possible to distinguish between institutions and individuals. The boycott does not say that an Israeli (or non-Israeli) working or teaching or otherwise doing research at an Israeli institution of higher learning ipso facto will be boycotted, it only says that the institution will be. Impossible to make this distinction in practice between institutions and individuals? Again, I have a hard time believing that it is impossible; difficult, at times, perhaps, but certainly not impossible. I have supervised several Israeli students and otherwise closely advised or mentored others, all of whom fall within the spectrum from right to left on the question of Israel’s policies, and I don’t see my practice changing. The question is the intellectual merits of the individuals and the proposed research, and also the degree to which the project is critical of existing injustices that fall within the scope of the topic. I suppose I can only make this judgment on the basis of the facts of the application but that is only all we ever have before us when making collaborative decisions such as these. Might the research I collaborate with be used later to support the oppressive policies of the Israeli state? Perhaps. But all of us take this risk with the research we publish once it is in the public domain. So, would I accept to work with a student (Israeli, Palestinian or other) from an Israeli university whose project explores a research topic within, say, Israel, but also looks at the question in a balanced way deploying critical anthropology at its best? Yes, absolutely I would work with him or her. Where I would have a problem is with someone who seems not to be aware of or averse to pushing a critical perspective, or is simply an apologist for one side or the other in the conflict. Where I would also have a problem is accepting an invitation from that student’s home institution to give a lecture or teach in the classroom.

To those who say there are better ways to address the very injustices that they too want to change, I ask that you please put them forward so that we can debate the proposal and decide whether we should support it. Give us the alternative. To those who say the boycott is ineffective, then propose something that is. To those who say that it will do more harm than good, it is hard to imagine how the present state of affairs can possibly be worse. But I hope the debate will allow us to explore what are obviously difficult and thorny issues.

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