• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 17,225 other followers

AAA Members Receive ACLS Fellowships

Congratulations to the 2014 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship Recipients!

Since 1957, more than 9,500 scholars have held ACLS fellowships and grants. ACLS fellowships and grants are awarded to individual scholars for excellence in research in the humanities and related social sciences. The peer-review process used to select ACLS Fellows enables distinguished scholars to reach broad consensus on standards of excellence in humanities research.

In the 2013-14 competition year, ACLS made awards totaling over $15 million to nearly 300 scholars selected from over 3,000 submitted applications.

Bowles, Jennifer S. / Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship
Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Hands on the Green Leaf: Everyday Dwelling in Argentina´s Yerba Mate Country

Fowles, Severin / ACLS Fellowship
Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Barnard College
Comanche New Mexico: An Archaeology

Graeter, Stefanie / Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship
Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology, University of California, Davis
Lead to the Laboratory: The Ethics and Science of Lead Exposure Politics in Central Peru.

Makley, Charlene / ACLS Fellowship
Professor, Anthropology, Reed College
The Politics of Presence: State-Led Development, Personhood and Power among Tibetans in China

Mariner, Kathryn A. / Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship
Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology, University of Chicago
Intimate Speculation: The Flows and Futures of Private Agency Adoption in the United States

Osburg, John / ACLS Programs in China Studies
Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Rochester
Tibetan Buddhism and Moral Personhood in Contemporary China

Oushakine, Serguei A. / Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship
Associate Professor, Anthropology; Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University
Disowned History: Soviet Pasts in the Afterlives of Empire

Spackman, Christy / Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship
Doctoral Candidate, Food Studies, New York University
Transforming Taste: Aesthetics in Medicine and Food

Wilcox, Emily E. / ACLS Fellowship
Assistant Professor, Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
National Movements: Socialist Postcoloniality and the Making of Chinese Dance

Zee, Jerry Chuanghwa / Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship
Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
The Windy State: Dust Storms and a Political Meteorology of Contemporary China

Voting on the 2014-2015 Webinar Series

As many of you know, the AAA has begun a monthly webinar series exploring the many facets of anthropology– both in professional development and topical studies.  We’re taking a little break for the summer, but look to start up again sometime in the Fall.  The professional development webinars have been pretty much ironed out, we’ll be dishing out advice on publishing your first journal article, presenting at the annual meeting, utilizing SPSS (and other quantitative software) in grant proposals, and developing a field blog (as well as many other useful topics).

However, we’ll be implementing something new in this phase: two webinars a month. The second webinar will focus on topical subjects, and we need your help to determine areas of interest.  I’ve set up an open ended survey on All Our Ideas.  What does this mean? It means, the AAA staff had a few ideas we thought would work out pretty well, but obviously the possibilities are endless, so if you want to see something happen, write it in, and other people will be able to vote on it just the same.

Since we’re basically setting up an open Mic, I would ask that people remain cordial and serious in this endeavor, no profanity in potential webinar titles.  We’d rather not take any ideas down, but if absolutely necessary we will. These choices should also be more thematic realms, rather than specific ideas– as once the voting is completed, we’ll then have to go search for someone interested in doing a webinar on the subject. It is not the AAA’s responsibility to track down your favorite anthropologist for a Q&A, but we’d be happy to run a webinar about the field of anthropology he or she works in.

You’ll find the survey here: http://www.allourideas.org/2014aaawebinars.

2014 AAA Photo Contest

If you could define your work in a single picture, what would it look like?toy-camera125x100

AAA members work all around the world, in the most diverse cultures imaginable, and we want to showcase them.  If you attended the annual meeting last year in Chicago, you may have noticed a calendar waiting in your complimentary bag with some truly gorgeous pictures—drawing not just from cultural anthropology, but also archaeology, linguistic, biological and political fields.

We’d like to do it again this year, drawing from a new batch of photographs provided by you, our membership.  Photographs can be anything you believe relates to your work; the photographs may not portray any nudity or illicit activity.

Contestants may submit their work in one of three categories: people, places, practice.  Along with your photograph, include a caption for your work, and a brief autobiographical statement of no more than 150 words.  Your biography will not affect your likelihood of being featured in the calendar—we just like to learn a little bit more about our active members. Photographs must be your own, and you must be a current member of the AAA.  Winning photos in the calendar will be printed at 11×8, so be sure the resolution is good enough to print at those dimensions.

For complete contest details and submission information, click here.

Social Scientists and the Minerva Project

Anthropologist David Price (St. Martin’s U) speaks to RT TV about the work of social scientist in the Minerva Project:

RT TV - David Price

 

New Archaeology Division Grants for Archiving Digital Data

AD Grant for Archiving Digital Data

To assist members of the AD in the preservation and dissemination of their data, images, and documents, the Archaeology Division of the AAA has established a grant program to support the archiving of digital archaeological data and documents in tDAR, an international digital repository. Reports and data shared through tDAR are made accessible on the web and their long-term preservation is ensured.

Five $200 grants are available annually for AD members to cover the upload fees in tDAR. $200 covers the upload fees for 6 files totaling up to 60 MB.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY SEPTEMBER 1st to the President Elect (see Officers for contact information), via e-mail (as a word document or PDF attachment-please include your last name in the name of the attachment). They should include the following:

• Your contact information
• A 2-page, single-spaced explanation of the files to be uploaded and their importance for the discipline.

Digital files contributed to tDAR through the grant program must be documented as completely as possible using tDAR’s web-based resource entry forms.

Applicants will be notified of the decisions by October 1st. Successful applicants will be able to access a voucher in tDAR for the grant amount.

AD Grant Program for Archiving Legacy Digital Data

In addition to the regular digital archiving program, the AD has established one annual $1000 grant for the archiving of larger quantities of legacy data that are likely to be lost without efforts made to preserve them.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY SEPTEMBER 1st to the President Elect (see Officers for contact information), via e-mail (as a word document or PDF attachment-please include your last name in the name of the attachment). They should include the following:

• Your contact information
• A 4-page, single spaced explanation of the project whose data, documents, etc. are to be preserved, the importance of this body of research, and the documents, datasets, etc. that are to be archived .

$1000 covers the upload fees for 33 files totaling up to 330 MB. Digital files contributed to tDAR through the grant program must be documented as completely as possible using tDAR’s web-based resource entry forms.

Applicants will be notified of the decisions by October 1st. Successful applicants will be able to access a voucher in tDAR for the grant amount.

Science and Technology Studies and Agricultural Anthropology: Todd A. Crane in the New Issue of Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment

This month, Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment publishes its latest journal issue, Tending the Field: Special Issue on Agricultural Anthropology and Robert E. Rhoades. The issue brings together a collection of articles that expand upon Rhoades’s work in agricultural anthropology. Of particular note for readers interested in participatory and collaborative research is Todd A. Crane’s contribution, “Bringing Science and Technology Studies into Agricultural Anthropology: Technology Development as Cultural Encounter between Farmers and Researchers.”

Crane argues for a unique and innovative twist to the “farmer-back-to-farmer” (FB2F) approach in the development of agricultural technologies. In the FB2F approach, outlined by Robert Rhoades and Robert Booth in 1982, the development of technologies begins and ends with farmers, considering their perspectives and considerations in developing technologies, as well as their evaluation, adaptation, and integration of proposed technologies. Crane updates this model by proposing that empirical social research on scientists’ institutional cultures and technical practices additionally be considered in applied agricultural research- a proposal that creatively integrates perspectives from science and technology studies (STS) into the FB2F approach. “Unpacking the “back-to” part of “farmer-back-to-farmer” means acknowledging researchers as stakeholders in the process, just as much as farmers are,” Crane writes. This proposal is of both applied and theoretical interest. As Crane argues:

Conducting empirical social research on scientists’ technical practices, social organization, and institutional norms- alongside the same research done with farmers- will enable a better theorization of how and why certain forms of applied agricultural research work (or do not work), which should in turn enable applied research strategies to become more effective. Furthermore, by including both farmers and research scientists in the analytical lens, we can also better understand the “hows” and “whys” of cultural encounters that occur when farmers and scientists work together (47).

To read this article through open-access, click here. Read the full issue of Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment on AnthroSource.

2014 AAA Photo Contest

If you could define your work in a single picture, what would it look like?toy-camera125x100

AAA members work all around the world, in the most diverse cultures imaginable, and we want to showcase them.  If you attended the annual meeting last year in Chicago, you may have noticed a calendar waiting in your complimentary bag with some truly gorgeous pictures—drawing not just from cultural anthropology, but also archaeology, linguistic, biological and political fields.

We’d like to do it again this year, drawing from a new batch of photographs provided by you, our membership.  Photographs can be anything you believe relates to your work; the photographs may not portray any nudity or illicit activity.

Contestants may submit their work in one of three categories: people, places, practice.  Along with your photograph, include a caption for your work, and a brief autobiographical statement of no more than 150 words.  Your biography will not affect your likelihood of being featured in the calendar—we just like to learn a little bit more about our active members. Photographs must be your own, and you must be a current member of the AAA.  Winning photos in the calendar will be printed at 11×8, so be sure the resolution is good enough to print at those dimensions.

For complete contest details and submission information, click here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 17,225 other followers