• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 16,849 other followers

Are You the Next Editor-in-Chief?

The American Anthropological Association seeks applications for a new Editor-in-Chief of the discipline’s flagship journal, the American Anthropologist, for a four-year term beginning July 1, 2016. Now in its second century of continuous publication, the American Anthropologist publishes articles, reviews, and commentaries from the diverse anthropological community. It is the most widely circulated anthropology journal published by the American Anthropological Association and showcases the breadth of the discipline.

Editorship of the journal provides a unique opportunity for an anthropologist to be a central player in anthropological scholarship shaping the discipline’s identity, impacting the future of anthropology, and initiating and participating in transnational dialogues. The editor is not expected to have expertise in all subfields of anthropology, but to be interested in creatively developing vital conversations within and across fields and national boundaries that will invigorate and contribute positively to the landscape for the transmission of knowledge and collaborative engagement. Applicants are encouraged to develop innovative and creative approaches that will allow them as Editor-in-Chief to put their own stamp on the journal. Editors are encouraged to solicit articles and contributions for special sections, and to develop issues of the journal that highlight critical topics in anthropology and in public debate. As the publishing field continues to develop the editor should also embrace new digital forms for scholarly content and build best practices for collaborative editorial team engagement. Above all, the AAA Executive Board seeks an Editor-in-Chief who will maintain the journal as a leader in intellectual and scholarly advances.

For complete position details and application information, click here.

2014 AAA Photo Contest

If you could define your work in a single picture, what would it look like?

AAA members work all around the world, in the most diverse cultures imaginable, and we want to showcase them.  If you attended the annual meeting last year in Chicago, you may have noticed a calendar waiting in your complimentary bag with some truly gorgeous pictures—drawing not just from cultural anthropology, but also archaeology, linguistic, biological and political fields.

We’d like to do it again this year, drawing from a new batch of photographs provided by you, our membership.  Photographs can be anything you believe relates to your work; the photographs may not portray any nudity or illicit activity.

Contestants may submit their work in one of three categories: people, places, practice.  Along with your photograph, include a caption for your work, and a brief autobiographical statement of no more than 150 words.  Your biography will not affect your likelihood of being featured in the calendar—we just like to learn a little bit more about our active members. Photographs must be your own, and you must be a current member of the AAA.  Winning photos in the calendar will be printed at 11×8, so be sure the resolution is good enough to print at those dimensions.

For complete contest details and submission information, click here.

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on World Anthropologies Undesignated Seat #9: Hsain Ilahiane and Kathleen O’Connor.

Committee member objectives are to identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations, to develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally, and to engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on World Anthropologies.

 

Hsain Ilahiane

Ilahiane_HsainI value the charge to and the objectives of the Committee on World Anthropologies and would be honored to serve on the committee as it endeavors to meet its mandate. I would like to work within this committee to:
1. foster deeper international collaboration;
2. promote the visibility of the theoretical and applied work of global south anthropologists;
3. explore ways to get global south students to attend, organize, and present at the AAA meetings; and
4. work to establish a global AAA presence in the form of online chapters.
I would like to leverage this opportunity to open the doors of the AAA to the world. I bring a set of world research experiences and networks to this seat. I carry out my research in Morocco and my areas of theoretical interest are development, poverty, globalization, economic anthropology, and political ecology throughout the Middle East. I have also carried out applied research in the United States, Mexico, Kenya, Uganda, and South Africa. I was a visiting senior social scientist at Intel Corporation in 2006-2007, and I have presented my work at conferences in the United States, Europe, Japan, and Africa.

Kathleen O’Connor

O'Connor_KathleenMy platform has two “planks”: the first is the issue of translation. I believe it is essential for anthropologists to translate our work and make it accessible to those with whom we have conducted fieldwork. I would strongly encourage AAA anthropologists to present research at conferences abroad, particularly in the host country. I have had the opportunity or presenting my Brazilian research in Brazil, in Portuguese, and it was an amazing experience to receive feedback from Brazilian colleagues. I believe that presenting our work to our hosts completes the ethnographic process by reporting what we learned, and allowing space for challenges, to make sure we get it right.
The second plank in my platform also follows the committee’s mandate to encourage global anthropologists to visit the US and present their work. If elected, I will work assiduously to find ways of facilitating this exchange through funding opportunities and networking. This year I participated on a panel at AAA attended by one of the top scholars in my research area, who came from the Netherlands. It was very exciting to meet someone I had been citing for years. Finally, increased interaction with global scholars serves a 21st century anthropology, which must adopt a fully global gaze.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on World Anthropologies Undesignated Seat #8: Theodore Bestor and Sandra Lopez Varela.

Committee member objectives are to identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations, to develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally, and to engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on World Anthropologies.

 

Theodore Bestor

Bestor_TedThroughout my career I have worked to expand close ties and collaborations among North American anthropologists and communities of anthropologists in East Asia. I was the founding president of the Society for East Asian Anthropology, and recently the President of the Association for Asian Studies. My goals are to promote greater degrees of communication and mutual interaction among scholars in diverse parts of the world and to encourage ways in which the AAA can facilitate ties to other anthropological organizations and academic communities.

Sandra Lopez Varela

Lopez Varela_SandraIn holding the archaeology chair at the Executive Board of the AAA, I have further the association’s efforts to expand a dialogue with our sister organizations to protect human rights and people’s heritage in these violent times around the world. This is not the first time in my professional career, that I have been given the responsibility to represent the values and interests of our academic community, without the frontiers of our geopolitical borders. Knowing and living the challenges that threshold and stronger economies face in today’s world has given me the opportunity to demonstrate to governments and institutions around the world, the benefits of increasing their financial support to research and education in the social sciences. In this context, we have worked ethically together to unite our worlds of knowledge for the benefit of our disciplines and society in general. Through these international dialogues, I have enhanced to those unfamiliar with the reach of anthropology that creating sustainable and responsible social models requires of its many approaches. It will be a great honor if I could have the opportunity to serve the CWA.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Labor Relations Undesignated Seat #2: Michael Duke and Lavanya Proctor.

Committee member responsibilities include:

• To provide the AAA Executive Board and AAA Meetings Department information about labor conditions relevant to the EB’s decisions about the scheduling of AAA annual meetings at the earliest possible stage of decision-making.
• To provide the AAA Executive Board information about labor conditions relevant to other EB decisions in regard to vendors and subcontractors, to the extent that it is feasible to do so.
• To seek information exchanges with other scholarly associations in regard to the above.
• To communicate regularly with the leadership of the EB, ACC, and AOC regarding significant issues relevant to the CLR’s charge.
• To provide the AAA membership with information about labor conditions relevant to anthropologists through such means as panels, meetings, and articles in the Anthropology Newsletter.
• When appropriate to provide the EB with information about labor conditions relevant to the employment of anthropologists and to advise them about possible positions and actions they might consider with respect to that information.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Labor Relations.

Michael Duke

Duke_MichaelAcross North America, workers and their families face stagnant wages, exploitative and unsafe working conditions, discrimination, and challenges to their right to organize. Workers in the hospitality industry are particularly vulnerable to these abusive labor practices. If elected to the Committee on Labor Relations, I will work tirelessly to ensure that the treatment of workers continues to play a central role in AAA’s event planning and purchasing decisions, and in the administration of the organization itself. Likewise, given the number of anthropologists employed as adjuncts, I will advocate for enhancing the Committee’s collaborative efforts with the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, in order to address the labor conditions of contingent faculty. Finally, in light of the critical mass of anthropologists working outside of academia, I will propose that a survey be developed to inform the AAA leadership about these members’ unique labor issues and concerns. I thank you for your support.

Lavanya Proctor

Proctor_LavanyaMy interests lie in the relationship between privileged forms of knowledge or statuses and access to socioeconomic opportunities, and in how this relationship perpetuates social inequalities. In today’s anthropological world, these inequities are reflected in the differences in the work situations between tenure-line and contingent faculty. These differences, in turn, profoundly affect the personal and professional lives of adjunct and contingent faculty. I am an active advocate, online and offline, for anthropology contingent faculty. I believe that the AAA’s efforts toward equity in labor issues must focus more on our own community, and I have been working with AAA leadership to address these issues. As a 2013 AAA Leadership Fellow, I gained insight into the workings of AAA governance. This fellowship also gave me the opportunity to advocate for contingent anthropologists at the 2013 meetings. If given the opportunity, I would like to be able to continue this advocacy more effectively from within the AAA leadership.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

New Virtual Issue of PoLAR: Law and Inequalities- Global and Local

lsa_flyer-lsa-virtual-issue_page_1Coinciding with the 50th Anniversary Law and Society Association (LSA) conference, PoLAR launches its fourth virtual issue, “Law and Inequalities- Global and Local” today! This exciting issue features 10 articles previously published in PoLAR that will be accessible for free through September. Additionally, the virtual issue features open-access postscripts by authors that provide reflections and updates on the authors’ research or related events that have taken place since the publication of the original article. An interview with legal anthropologists, Sally Engle Merry and Susan Bibler Coutin will also be available after the LSA conference. In this interview, conducted by two of PoLAR’s Digital Editorial Fellows, Sean Mallin and Stacy Topouzova, Merry and Coutin will discuss the themes and events of the LSA conference in relation to their joint American Ethnological Association/Association of Political and Legal Anthropology Presidential Address, “Technologies of Truth in the Anthropology of Conflict.”

Table of Contents

Griffiths, Anne (2000) “Gender, Power, and Difference: Reconfiguring Law from Bakwena Women’s Perspectives.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 23(2): 89-106.

Castro, Robert (2007) “Plying the Liberty Trade: Law, Empire-Building, and the Enforcement of Antislavery Scriptures in the Reconstruction of New Mexico.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 30(1): 109-130.

Jeffery, Laura (2006) “Historical Narrative and Legal Evidence: Judging Chagossians’ High Court Testimonies.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 29(2): 228-253.

Terrio, Susan (2003) “You’ll Get Your Day in Court: Judging Delinquent Youth at the Paris Palace of Justice.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 26(2): 136-164.

Newendorp, Nicole (2011) “Contesting “Law and Order”: Immigrants’ Encounters with “Rule of Law” in Postcolonial Hong Kong.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 34(1): 95-111.

Idrus, Rusaslina (2010) “From Wards to Citizens: Indigenous Rights and Citizenship in Malaysia.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 33(1): 89-108.

Speed, Shannon and Alvaro, Reyes (2002) “In Our Own Defense: Rights and Resistance in Chiapas.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 25(1): 69-89.

Rubin, Jonah (2008) “Adjudicating the Salvadoran Civil War: Expectations of the Law in Romagoza.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 31(2): 264-285.

Bunt, Laura (2008) “A Quest for Justice in Cusco, Peru: Race and Evidence in the Case of Mercedes Corimanya Lavilla.” PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review 31(2): 286-302.

To access the issue, click here.

 

For more information on the 50th Anniversary Law and Society Association conference (May 29th-June 1st, 2014), click here. Of note, APLA members Robin Conley and Justin Richland have created a new Collaborative Research Network, “Ethnography, Law & Society.” The kickoff business meeting will be held at the LSA conference on Thursday, May 29th, 3:30-4:30 pm in Boardroom 3.

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Public Policy Undesignated Seat #4: Jill Koyama and Sarah Ono.

Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  2. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  3. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
  4. To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Jill Koyama

Koyama_JillI study public policy as a field of activity, offering a cultural analysis that captures the complexity of policy processes. These ethnographic investigations are situated across three strands of inquiry. They are: the productive social assemblages of policy and practices; the controversies of globalizing policy; and the politics of language and newcomer policy. My research focus has moved from policy explicitly created to influence schooling, to the macroeconomic regulations and transnational maneuverings, such as immigration policy, that continue to impact the inequities in education and society.
I am also committed to bringing anthropological perspectives to bear on public policy dialogues. In 2013, at a conference entitled “The Future of Anthropology and Education” at Teachers College, I spoke about this commitment. In addition, I am utilizing social and popular media to reach a broader audience. Recently, an OpEd, based on my three-year study of refugees, was published in The Huffington Post. Follow me on Twitter @Koyamawonders.

A member of AAA, and the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE) since 2003, I have recently joined the newly-formed Association for Anthropology of Policy (ASAP). I am also an associate editor of Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), the journal of CAE.

Sarah Ono

Ono~SarahIf working for the federal government has taught me one thing, it is that there are drawbacks to working in silos. When I joined the VA, the pervasive reference to “silos” was a relatively foreign concept, with my strongest association being the skyline in rural America. As anthropologists I hope that we bring the holism of our methodology to our professional practice and I see CoPP as a way to support this. I value anthropology and anthropologists. We do something unique, important, and potentially powerful. Where we fall short is when we fail to engage outside of our discipline in open-minded and open-hearted ways – whatever these may prove to be. In 2011, I began co-editing a monthly column for Anthropology News, “Anthropology in the Public Sector”, as a way to strengthen connections between working as a public servant and maintaining my involvement with colleagues on theoretical and professional issues. I am invested in being an anthropologist, I am interested in serving my professional community, and I have seen how policy development is a dynamic process. If the counter to silos is bridges, then I aspire to be a bridge builder and CoPP Undesignated Seat #4 is a good place to start. Thank you for your consideration and your support.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 16,849 other followers