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The 2014 Annual Meeting Mobile App has arrived!

Print I’m sure you’ve all be waiting with baited breath for the official release of this year’s annual meeting mobile application.  There are quite a few search-ability enhancements you’ll all appreciate. Be sure to take advantage of the communication and scheduling options as well.

I wanted to take some time specifically to address an issue we had last year, which was availability to recently registered attendees.  While we would like to provide you with instantaneous access to this amazing app, it isn’t always feasible.  I won’t bore you with details, but there will be a lag between the time you’ve registered and the time you have access to the mobile app. With any luck this will be mitigated to an hour or so. If you go a day without having access to the mobile app, then you might want to contact one of the staff (who will probably direct you to me).  You patience during this process is greatly appreciate, as we are a constantly evolving (and hopefully improving) association.

For example, I just ran the attendee list. So if you registered after 11/24/2014, then you will likely not be on the mobile app list until the next update is done, which will be tomorrow.

Without further delay, you can pick your app up on the iTunes Store or the Android Store. We don’t have a Windows App or one for Blackberry, but if there’s enough of a demand, I’ll try and get something together for next year.

Practicing, Applied & Public Anthropology: Sessions of Interest

Today’s guest blog post is by the Committee on Practicing, Applied and Public Interest Anthropology (CoPAPIA). NOTE: All rooms are at the Marriott Wardman Park, unless indicated otherwise. Check program for NAPA-sponsored workshops and to confirm times and places of listed sessions.

Wednesday, December 3

Paradox and Resolution in Consumer Research
8 pm—9:45 pm Delaware Suite B

Thursday, December 4

Producing Anthropology and Tourism: Practicing Anthropologists in the Tourism Sector
11 am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 5

Spinning Anthropology in the Anthropocene: Integrating Theoretical & Applied Approaches to Meet the Challenge of Climate Change
Part 1 9am—10:45 am Marriott Balcony B Part 2 2:30 pm—4:15 pm Harding Room

Pathways and Approaches to Practicing Anthropology in Veteran and Military Health Services Research
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Five Fields Update
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Delaware Suite B

Friday, December 5

9th Annual NAPA/AAA Careers Expo: Exploring Professional Careers
11am—4:00 pm Exhibit Hall C

Producing the Anthropology of Policy Across the Discipline
11am—12:45 pm Delaware Suite A (sponsored by CoPAPIA and ASAP)

Public Policy Forum on Indigenous Educational Policy in the U.S.
11am—12:45 pm Roosevelt Room 2

Producing Health Policy with Anthropology: Case Studies of Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Policy
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite A

Producing Anthropology in Evaluation: Connecting Culture, Equity, Value, and Program Effectiveness
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Marriott Balcony B

“Producing Anthropology” Through Community Engagement
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Maryland Suite C

Honoring J. Anthony Paredes (1939-2013): Ethnologist, Applied Anthropologist, and Friend
2:30pm—4:15 pm Wilson A

The Practice of Anthropology: Consider the Past, Focus on the Future
6:30 pm—8:15 pm Jackson Room

Saturday, December 6

Critical Issues in Anthropology: Constructing Local Practitioner Networks
9 am—10:45 am Washington Room 1 (sponsored by CoPAPIA)

Engaging Anthropology: Experiences from Scandinavia
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall East

Medical Anthropologists in Dept of Veteran Affairs: Our Network, Collaboration, and Methods
9 am—10:45 am Johnson Room

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Life in the Federal Government
9 am—10:45 am Thurgood Marshall South

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Private Sector Applications
11 am—12:45 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

NAPA Networking Event: Producing Connections through Conversations
1 pm—2:15 pm Marriott Ballroom Salon 2

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: International Development Opportunities
2:30 pm – 4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 5

The Practice of Anthropology in the National Capital Region: Student Experiences
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Roosevelt Room 1

Negotiating Public Policy: Actors, Knowledge, and Contested Political Fields
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Forum Room (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

But Is It Science? Producing Justice-Oriented Ethnography of Education for Varied Publics
2:30 pm—4:15 pm Palladian Ballroom (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

Sunday, December 7

The Relevance of Anthropology: Using Anthropological Theory & Methods to Address Complex Questions
8 am—9:45 am Taylor Room

Research Methods, Media Campaigns, and Collaboration: Innovative Approaches in Applied Anthropology
10 am—11:45 am Marriott Balcony B

Understanding Community in the [Applied] Anthropological Context
12 pm—1:45 pm Marriott Balcony B

Negotiating Boundaries and Contesting Terrain: Anthropological Knowledge in Legal Settings
12 pm—1:45 pm Virginia Suite B

 

Format for December 4th Members’ Open Forum on Engagement with Israel and Palestine

Today’s guest blog post is written by Ed Liebow, Executive Director.

Last July’s Anthropology News mentioned a variety of ways in which AAA leadership is trying to foster dialogue and information exchange among AAA members on anthropologically relevant issues related to Israel/Palestine. We mentioned there that an Open Forum would be held at the Annual Meeting; it has now been scheduled for Thursday 4 December, from 13:00 to 14:15 in the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Ballroom Salon 2. Our goal is to facilitate dialogue among AAA Members, bringing to bear on the conversation the culture of inquiry and analytical skills characteristic of our profession.

The frame for the discussion is: what issues related to Israel/Palestine are relevant to us as anthropologists, as members of a scholarly association, and to the AAA as an association of anthropologists?

Here is what you can expect at the Open Forum. The hall will be arranged with a number of tables; the hall is large and we can accommodate many small groups. You will be encouraged to sit with people you do not already know well. There will be introductory remarks from Monica Heller, the AAA President, a brief update on the work of the AAA Task Force on Engagement on Issues related to Israel/Palestine by the Task Force chair, AAA Past-President Don Brenneis, and a short explanation of the forum’s format by our lead facilitator, Tarek Maassarani. The process will include an opening round to build trust and familiarity amongst participants; several discussion rounds with prompts to share what questions, knowledge, perspectives, and experiences participants bring to the table; and a reflective closing round to share insights and their relevance beyond this one event.

Participants will also be given index cards that they can place in feedback boxes as they leave the room. Facilitators will be asked to fill out a reflection form immediately following the dialogue to help us better understand what happened at each table. If there is time, we might be able to hear from some of the facilitators before we need to vacate the room. Since the objective at this stage is to foster dialogue among members, we will check badges at the entrance. Executive Board members, Task Force members, Section Assembly leadership and AAA staff will likely attend as observers. We will ask the press to respect our privacy during the Forum, though we are happy for participants to speak to the press (or blog or tweet) before and after the event. We are also open to considering further such events, whether open only to members or not.

AES Graduate-Student Workshops at the 113th AAA Annual Meeting

American Ethnological Society

The American Ethnological Society is pleased to announce its ongoing series of graduate-student workshops. The workshops will take place during the American Anthropological Association’s 113th Annual Meeting in Washington DC.

Each workshop is limited to ten students. The workshops are free. To apply for a workshop, please send a 250-300-word description of your research project and its relationship to the workshop theme. Descriptions will be shared with other workshop participants in advance of the meeting. In addition, your faculty leader(s) may circulate one short piece for discussion.

Preference will be given to AES Student Members, though non-members are also encouraged to apply. Students can join the AES for $18.

To apply for a workshop, or if you have any questions, please contact: Andrew Hernann (ahernann@gc.cuny.edu). The deadline to apply is November 1, 2014.

We are pleased to offer the following five workshops:

Teaching Intro: Strategies for Reaching our Largest Public Audience
Faculty facilitator: Kenneth Guest (Baruch College CUNY/AES Treasurer)
Date: Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014
Time: 9:00 am-10: 45 am

More than 200,000 students take “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology” in the United States every year. This is by far anthropology’s largest public audience. It is where anthropology departments have their largest enrollments—and we may have these students for as many as 15 weeks. Facilitated by Prof. Kenneth Guest, author of the new textbook, Cultural Anthropology: A Toolkit for a Global Age (2014), this discussion considers strategies for engaging introductory students in deep learning about the way the world works using the tools of anthropology.

Ethnography for the 21st Century
Faculty facilitators: Joseph Masco (University of Chicago), Ken Wissoker (Editorial Director, Duke University Press)
Date: Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm-2:15 pm

Ethnography, by definition, seeks to describe and theorize culture. Words on the page, however, are a rather thin device relative to culture’s “thickness.” Nonetheless, despite the dramatic technological innovations of the past couple of decades, the written ethnography has remained largely unchanged. In this workshop, we explore the possibilities beyond the traditional written ethnography. We ask such questions as: How can ethnographers make use of both hardware and software, including e-readers, websites, etc.? How can we utilize technology to create an ethnography that better connects, informs and teaches increasingly techno-savvy undergraduates? Facilitated by Prof. Joseph Masco and Editorial Director Ken Wissoker, this workshop brings together experts in ethnography and technology and future ethnographers, critically engaging the potentials of this technoscape for the ethnographic genre.

Publishing in Anthropology: Tips on Academic Writing and Peer Review
Faculty facilitators: Angelique Haugerud (Editor, American Ethnologist/Rutgers University), Catherine Besteman (AE editorial board member/Colby College), Eric Gable (AE book review editor/University of Mary Washington), and other AE editorial board members.
Date: Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm-2:15 pm

In this workshop, Prof. Angelique Haugerud, Prof. Catherine Besteman, and Prof. Eric Gable offer advice on publishing in scholarly journals as well as for wider audiences. Topics include elements of successful academic writing, navigating the peer review process, what goes on behind the scenes in editorial boards and editorial offices, selecting journals and approaching editors, writing for edited volumes, preparing book reviews and book prospectuses, and how to get an article accepted in the American Ethnologist. This session will include time for participants to ask questions about a range of publishing processes and practices.

Writing Violence
Faculty facilitators: Carolyn Nordstrom (Notre Dame University), Sally Engle Merry (New York University)
Date: Friday, Dec. 5, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm-2:15 pm

All ethnographic writing poses challenges. A political act, ethnography raises questions of representation and (inter-)subjectivity. However, ethnography of violence and conflict encounters some particular issues. For instance: How to avoid fetishizing violence? How to alleviate the perpetrator-victim dichotomy? How to prevent accounts of violence from becoming white noise? How to prevent violence from becoming a trope in/for certain regions? Following up on last year’s successful graduate student roundtable, “Methodological and Ethical Issues in Ethnographic Research on Conflict and Violence,” co-facilitators Prof. Carolyn Nordstrom and Prof. Sally Engle Merry come together again in order to take a critical look at the difficulties of writing about violence.

Bridging the Gap: On Anthropology and Islamic Studies
Faculty facilitators: Engseng Ho (Duke University), Andrew Shryock (University of Michigan)
Date: Friday, Dec. 5, 2014
Time: 9:00 am-10:45 am

Trans-disciplinarity has been in vogue for the past decade, yet, the conversation in many ways remains confused and/or unapproachable. This is especially problematic for anthropologists of Islam. Anthropology tends to privilege “popular” or “syncretic” expressions of religion, often underplaying the influence of “orthodoxy” and central religious texts. As a result, anthropology frequently fails to create a space to learn or critically engage the literature and theoretical entry points that are central to Islamic Studies. The result: (1) an anthropology ill-equipped to consider more “formal” approaches to Islam, as well as their relationship to “popular” Islam; and (2) an anthropology unable to effectively communicate with Islamic Studies (and vice versa). In this workshop, Prof. Engseng Ho and Prof. Andrew Shryock discuss how we can make the two disciplines better resonate with one another. Specifically, we ask: How can anthropologists make better use of Islamic Studies; and can anthropological work effectively contribute to Islamic Studies? A fresh contribution to the discussion of trans-disciplinarity, this workshop explores how to resist disciplinary enclavement and engage broader analyses in theoretically meaningful ways.

Book Your Annual Meeting Hotel at a Discount

113th AAA Annual MeetingThe 2014 Annual Meeting will take place at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel and Omni Shoreham Hotel. Both hotels will host scholarly panels and roundtables, special events, and other activities during the week-long conference.

AAA has negotiated special rates for AAA attendees at both hotels. Reservations can be made online via the links below. These rates are limited. Don’t hesitate and book today!

Call for Submissions – Ethnographic Terminalia

Today’s guest blog post is by Fiona McDonald.

Ethnographic Terminalia 2014 Call for Submissions

Submission deadline: September 5th, 2014
to ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

We seek projects in any medium for inclusion in Ethnographic Terminalia 2014––The Bureau of Memories: Archives and Ephemera. This theme (two sides of the same coin) invites reflection on the archive and its discontents. Washington’s identity as the seat of American political power is amplified through its role as the locus of its own memorialization. Where there is history, there is haunting. By drawing on the archive’s unnerving, uncanny, and ephemeral specters, this exhibition is an effort to re-imagine and reposition archives as sites which not only have the capacity to produce and contest historical memory, but also generate significant gaps and blind spots.

Ethnographic Terminalia is an initiative that brings artists and anthropologists together to present emerging research through installation and exhibition. As a platform from which divergent modes and methodologies of inquiry are articulated, Ethnographic Terminalia asks what lies within and beyond disciplinary territories, and how those boundaries shape the representation of cultural practice. Now in its sixth year, Ethnographic Terminalia represents a diversity of material, conceptual, and creative engagements where anthropology and art intersect. Inhabiting gallery spaces and site-specific locations, these include sound, drawing, sculpture, photography, printmaking, video, film, Internet and multi- media works. Organized as a para-site and Installation project of the American Anthropological Association annual meeting, this year’s exhibition will be shown in Washington D.C. at Hierarchy, a new venue near the AAA meeting headquarters.

Submission Format and Guidelines:

Please compile the information below into one MSWord format (.docx or .doc) document (MAX 10 pages), preferably in the following order:

  • Personal contact information (email, phone, postal address)
  • Title of project
  • An artist’s or maker’s statement of project (up to 300 words)
  • A short biographical statement (100 words)
  • A technical proposal for installation of your piece and footprint with measurements (dimensions and technical requirements). Please be as specific as possible about any technologies that you will require or provide.
  • A current CV or résumé (no more than 2 pages)

Submissions should also include:

  • 3 digital images (sized 300 dpi 4”x6”) of the proposed piece
  • A link somewhere in your document to a website for video works, if applicable

Send submissions and queries directly to: ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

Works must arrive in Washington, D.C. between November 25th and 30th, 2014. If you are unable to work with these dates, please indicate this in your proposal so that alternative arrangements can be made. Please note that preference will be given to completed works. Funding is regrettably not available to support the travel costs of artists, the development of works, shipping, or insurance.

Ethnographic Terminalia 2014—Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Memories: Archives and Ephemera will run from December 3rd-7th, 2014. There will be a reception on Friday, December 5th, 2014 at 7pm at Hierarchy and other special events TBA (schedule is subject to change).

All applicants will be notified about the status of their submission by October 1st, 2014

PDF Download: International Call for Submissions

Book Your Annual Meeting Hotel at a Discount

113th AAA Annual MeetingThe 2014 Annual Meeting will take place at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel and Omni Shoreham Hotel. Both hotels will host scholarly panels and roundtables, special events, and other activities during the week-long conference.

AAA has negotiated special rates for AAA attendees at both hotels. Reservations can be made online via the links below. These rates are limited and will only last until November 11th. Don’t hesitate and book today!

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