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It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Voting ends today at 5pm EST. Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we are taking a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #7 of the Committee on World Anthropologies. Committee member objectives are to identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations, to develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally, and to engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on World Anthropologies.

Zoe CrosslandZoe Crossland

My research in Madagascar, the UK and Argentina takes me to three continents, and has encouraged an interest in how anthropological knowledge and techniques circulate outside the US, as well a concern to find ways to foster scholarly exchange internationally. In looking for ways to cultivate conversations between colleagues and students in different parts of the world I have usually seized particular opportunities as they presented themselves, seeking funding on an impromptu basis, as grants become available. While this kind of action has some limited impact, I am interested in working within the institutional structure of the AAA to find more consistent and sustainable ways to promote international collaboration.

The AAA is particularly well-placed to do this, given its wide reach and its membership’s varied experiences. In thinking about global inequalities and discrepancies in the intellectual work of anthropology I would value the chance to work with colleagues in the context of the AAA. I hope in this way to build upon my own experiences developing collaborative international fieldwork, conference grants, and publications; and to learn more about the possibilities for fostering access and collaboration across all dimensions of scholarship, including teaching, research and dissemination.

Ritu KhanduriRitu Khanduri

Serving on the Committee on World Anthropologies (CWA) will offer an opportunity to further my commitment to the Committee’s objectives, namely, to enhance and increase interaction with US and international anthropologists, and benefit anthropology globally. The CWA has identified three areas in which these objectives may be pursued: conference participation across the globe, broader publication in the CWA column, and access to research publications. My research and writing engage globalization processes, media, science and gender in the context of colonial and contemporary India. In addition, I have already begun working toward achieving the CWA’s objectives since having been selected as AAA’s Leadership Fellow in 2010. For more than a year, as a Leadership Fellow I have managed and edited the Anthropology News column titled, “J Drive.” This monthly column highlights the work and research of early career scholars in non-US institutions, and where applicable, collaborators in the US. As a member of the CWA, I look forward to serving in a larger capacity, continuing my work promoting the research of international scholars, and collaborating with colleagues to advance the CWA’s initiatives.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Voting ends tomorrow (Friday) at 5pm EST. Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we are taking a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #6 of the Committee on World Anthropologies. Committee member objectives are to identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations, to develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally, and to engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on World Anthropologies.

Florence_BabbFlorence Babb

I share the Committee on World Anthropologies’ commitment to developing broad international alliances, particularly in the global South.  I am active in the AAA, recently serving on the Executive Board and as Section Assembly Convenor, Chair of the Association Operations Committee, member of the Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology, President of the Association for Feminist Anthropology, and board member for SLACA and AFA. As a life member of the interdisciplinary Latin American Studies Association, I have been Chair of the Sexualities Section and a member of the Gender Section board.  I participate in international conferences including the Americanist congress and IUAES as well as regional meetings abroad, and find these to be among my most gratifying experiences.  Moreover, I have considerable collaborative experience with my southern colleagues in Latin America, publish often in Spanish, and travel to meetings on three continents.  My long-term research emphasizes gender, race, indigeneity, and nation as critical elements in understanding culture and power globally, and I would bring this perspective to my work on the CWA.  I would be honored to work with the committee to productively decenter US anthropology and help build what are called to our south “otros saberes,” or other knowledges.

Monica SmithMonica Smith

In many world regions, archaeology is front-page news. Local constituents ranging from educators and architects to farmers, developers, and business owners all engage in public dialogues about tangible heritage. Knowledge about the past can be an excellent entrée into wide-ranging discussions about identity-formation, the development of social status and privilege, access to formal institutions of learning and culture (including museums as well as schools), and environmental impacts. Over the past twenty years, I have worked on international collaborative excavation and survey projects in Europe, North Africa and South Asia; the contacts that I have sustained in the course of these projects have enabled me to listen to and engage with local perceptions of the value of archaeological research and heritage preservation. Our colleagues around the world have much to offer to the AAA’s mission of anthropological awareness, with a freshness of approach grounded in both local experience and global realities. Given the Association’s many publication and presentation opportunities, the AAA can and should be the leading forum for all fields of anthropology, and it would be a pleasure to serve on the committee whose explicit goal is to serve as a liaison between the AAA and other international anthropological organizations.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #3 of the Committee on Public Policy (CoPP). Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  1. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  2. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Chip CCChip Colwell-Chanthaphonh

Anthropology has vital perspectives to contribute to public policy. From my work on protecting sacred sites, to museum repatriation, to the human rights of 9/11 families, I have become deeply aware of how sound public policies require the translation of anthropological insights. As a member of the Committee on Public Policy, I will be a keen advocate for the many policy issues confronting the AAA, and society, such as immigration law, climate change, education, economic equality, and health care. I pledge to help achieve our discipline’s aspirations particularly by ensuring the Committee continues to focus on fostering dialogues on the most pressing issues of our times, educating policy makers about anthropological contributions, and amplifying the impacts of AAA members who work in the arenas of practicing, applied, and public interest anthropology.

Tim_WallaceTim Wallace

In my role as the President of NAPA as well as a member of the Executive Board for the SfAA, and now as a member of the Executive Committee of the AAA Section Assembly, I have been able to work closely with a range of anthropologists and anthropological perspectives in understanding the issues facing anthropology and the need to make sure anthropological perspectives are included in the key public policy issues of our day, particularly in the areas of environmental sustainability, global warming, migration rights, human rights and social justice. Anthropologists must take an active role in the major issues that confront our globalized world. While the members of the AAA talk about the importance taking a principled stand, often we do not develop a sufficiently unified voice to confront the challenges to our world. The AAA is now at a critical juncture in our history where multiple agendas and priorities are emerging that sometimes appear conflicting. We must unify around a single voice to be effective. The Public Policy Committee is the essential forum where the AAA can develop a reasoned, practical response to these challenges. I am committed to working on the effective, timely and continuous production of activities and discussions that will accomplish this goal.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #6 of the Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology (CMIA). Committee member objectives are to: promote participation of underrepresented populations in anthropology by creating a climate where ideas from all individuals are equally considered, rather than viewed through a racialized frame; foster professional advancement by minorities in anthropology; promote intellectual awareness within the discipline and Association of issues that face minority anthropologists; and help define anthropology’s role in national discourse on cultural diversity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology.

Kristin Monroe

Kristin MonroeI believe my background and interests are a good fit for the position of member of the CMIA. In my departmental service, I am helping to initiate curricular changes intended to attract minority students to anthropology through, for example, my development of a “Sports and Society” course that focuses substantively on issues of race and gender and will draw students from across the campus as part of the university’s general education program. At the graduate level, my interest in minority recruitment led me to co-convene an ad hoc Diversity Committee and to develop ties with the graduate admissions office that have involved participation in diversity recruitment and retention workshops. From my experience as a ‘minority within a minority’, as one of the very few non-heritage anthropologists of color working in Middle Eastern studies, I have developed a commitment to expanding the range of academic, career, and public engagement possibilities for minority anthropologists. Finally, I would bring a broad vision of diversity to my role with the CMIA, a vision that includes the experiences of non-traditional and first-generation students. I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to the objectives of the CMIA as a fully engaged and participatory board member.

Krystal Smalls

Krystal SmallsAs a female, black-identified anthropologist who is a close ally of the LGBTQ community, it is extremely important to me that the professional and personal experiences of other minoritized anthropologists become a central concern of AAA. Having personally experienced the isolation many minoritized anthropologists endure in the discipline, I am committed to furthering conversations about, and practical efforts towards, clearing out spaces for these scholars so that their talents and theoretical contributions can be fully realized and ultimately utilized by the discipline. I see addressing the particular concerns and experiences of minoritized anthropologists as integral in our collective dedication to interrogating our discipline and the knowledge industry as a whole.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #1 of the Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology (CMIA). Committee member objectives are to: promote participation of underrepresented populations in anthropology by creating a climate where ideas from all individuals are equally considered, rather than viewed through a racialized frame; foster professional advancement by minorities in anthropology; promote intellectual awareness within the discipline and Association of issues that face minority anthropologists; and help define anthropology’s role in national discourse on cultural diversity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology.

Flordeliz Bugarin

Florie BugarinAs a cultural anthropologist and archaeologist, I specialize in Africa and the African Diaspora.  I focus on the heritage and culture of African Americans, Gambians, South African Xhosa, and Filipino Americans.  I also bridge historical archaeology, heritage management, and international development.  Throughout my work, I support community-driven initiatives, focus on minority concerns, and participate in activities geared towards increasing diversity in our profession. As a faculty member at Howard University, an HBCU, I have made concerted efforts to actively recruit Africans, African Americans and other minority students into anthropology.  I have organized conferences and workshops, raised funds for scholarships and assistantships, and developed field schools and student internships.  I have also built a consistent service record devoted to diversity issues.  As Chair of the Gender and Minority Affairs Committee for the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA), I have attended workshops on diversity and anti-racism to generate new programmatic strategies.  I have also supported a successful mentorship program. A seat on the AAA Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology (CMIA) will allow me to continue similar work and make significant contributions in minority affairs.  My experiences and goals mirror the agenda of the CMIA: to encourage more minorities to join the AAA, inspire all AAA members to actively strive towards a diverse community, and define anthropology’s role in the discourse of cultural diversity.

Satish Kedia

Satish KediaOver 15 years of professional experience in academia blended with a practitioner role as the director of research and evaluation centers have provided me with a unique perspective on challenges facing minority scholars, not only within the discipline but also in other practitioner roles. It continues to be a daunting task for the discipline to attract minorities, both locally and globally. Equally, we still find ourselves bewildered as to how to actively include minorities at all levels of training, research, and teaching and to create space for their voices as part of the sustained intellectual discourse. Needless to reiterate, it is a moral responsibility for us to recognize and amend the situation by constructively engaging and acting on these issues. By its very nature of the discipline, we must embrace diversity, not only rhetorically but in all our actions. If elected, I will actively promote engagement with international scholars and students through focused outreach efforts, facilitate minority student mentoring and shadowing, and advocate for exchange programs among national and international minority scholars. Given my lived experiences as an Asian American, I will bring additional insights and commitment to these issues and help devise innovative ways to engage ourselves with all segments of the population.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #7 of the Committee for Human Rights (CfHR). Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • To assist in organizing human rights forum, sessions, workshops or other events at AAA Annual Meeting;
  • To consider and respond to cases of alleged human rights abuse;
  • To educate anthropologists on human rights;
  • To educate policy makers and others outside of anthropology on anthropology’s perspective and contributions to human rights;
  • To work in coalition with other professional and human rights organizations to promote human rights.

Click here to learn more about the Committee for Human Rights.

Audrey Cooper

Audrey CooperAs a linguistic anthropologist interested in connections between language usage, social policy, and language-centered social change/movements, I am drawn to serve on the committee for human rights because I believe this committee to be a vital forum for establishing a model for language rights both within the organization, and the field as a whole. Conducting research with signed language users in the United States and southern Vietnam, I am particularly interested in the ways that the latter are marked according to body (not linguistic) statuses, as well as how body practices are disciplined and regulated according to normative social, political, and economic hierarchies produced within specific locales, national contexts, and transnational arrangements. Social “inclusion” of deaf persons is among the “hot” terrains now garnering global human rights attention. Yet the perspectives of signed language users is rarely represented; rarer still are they used to problematize disability inclusion policies, among other human rights-related concerns. As a member of this committee I believe I would contribute a perspective on language that promotes not only critical parsing of relevant issues, including how we talk about rights and the impacts of assumptions grounded in those forms of talk, but ways of addressing material concerns through everyday communication.

Tricia Gabany-Guerrero

Tricia Gabany-GuerreroI will work to bring the voice of the American Anthropological Association to the forefront of contemporary and heritage human rights issues at national and international levels.  I believe that I can contribute to the committee because of my volunteer and professional experiences with human rights and other non-governmental organizations in the U.S. and Latin America.  I also have experience working with congressional offices that resulted in successful legislation on human rights in Sub-Saharan Africa.  My research and field experience includes working for indigenous organizations in Mexico.

I believe that the AAA needs to create a critical advocacy and policy presence that informs the public and policymakers with research-based evidence regarding human rights issues around the globe. In my opinion, anthropologists in advocacy, research and education should be incorporated in initiatives that are brought before the AAA for action.  My hope is that I can serve the membership of the AAA, but more than that, serve the goals of the organization to advocate for human rights where our voices are most needed.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #5 of the Committee for Human Rights (CfHR). Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • To assist in organizing human rights forum, sessions, workshops or other events at AAA Annual Meeting;
  • To consider and respond to cases of alleged human rights abuse;
  • To educate anthropologists on human rights;
  • To educate policy makers and others outside of anthropology on anthropology’s perspective and contributions to human rights;
  • To work in coalition with other professional and human rights organizations to promote human rights.

Click here to learn more about the Committee for Human Rights.

K. Anne Pyburn

K Ann Pyburn I am interested in serving on this committee because I have an academic interest in the relationship between heritage and human rights and would like to encourage more of my peers with an interest in heritage to move from postcolonial critique to political activism. As a student of research ethics, economic development and cultural property I am aware of the potential for good intentions to inspire neocolonialism and familiar with the often spectacular failures of top-down development programs. But it seems to me that the remedy for these errors as well as the impetus toward activism lies in anthropology and that it is unfortunate that our professional reticence has allowed programs and policies to be set without the benefit of anthropology. As a member of this committee I would work to raise awareness of human rights issues, which is the committee charge, but would emphasize reasoned consideration of strategies that have been or might be successful in addressing human rights violations. I would also promote discussion and debate through forums and workshops about the meaning of activism within the several subfields of anthropology and the responsibility entailed in the privilege of being an anthropologist.

Jeanne Simonelli

Jeanne SimonelliWorking for human rights means working for the rights of all: women, men and communities in the broadest sense.  Civil rights, economic and environmental justice, rights to land and life are all part of this package.  There is little about anthropology, and of all of its subdiscipines that doesn’t touch on, provide evidence for, or help unravel the puzzle of human existence, contributing to the application of anthropological perspectives in active support of human rights issues.  As an applied cultural anthropologist, I have worked with this directly, in Chiapas, Mexico with the Zapatistas, where human rights violations are identifiable and vivid.  Closer to home, work in Canyon de Chelly has emphasized the right of the Dine (Navajo) to land and culture.  More recently, I am involved with the battle for ‘civil fracking rights,’ as New Yorkers and others fight for home rule and the ability to maintain their lives and environment.  As a member of the AAA Human Rights committee, I will work to make sure anthropological knowledge informs and influences policy surrounding all dimensions of the struggle for human rights.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

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