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It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for the undesignated seat of the Committee on Ethics. The objective of the Committee on Ethics is a standing committee of the Association, which is responsible for the design and implementation of the Association’s ethics education and advisory program. The objectives of the ethics education program are (1) to increase the number of candidates for all degrees in anthropology receiving training in ethics before graduating; (2) to provide ongoing education in ethical issues for all AAA members; (3) to provide advice to AAA members facing/raising ethical dilemmas, and (4) to provide guidance to the Executive Board about AAA codes and guidelines.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Ethics.

Scott HutsonScott Hutson

My ethical commitments roughly follow Anthony Appiah’s insistence on ethical principles that are both rooted and cosmopolitan. As a qualification for this position, I have served twice as a judge for the Ethics Bowl at the Society for American Archaeology meetings (2007, 2009). Insofar as anthropologists’ relations with indigenous people are an important part of anthropological ethics, a second qualification includes my having lived and worked in indigenous communities as part of my field research but also as a result of chance circumstances not related to research.  More specifically, I have worked with native Maya people in Mexico for the last 15 years, and have also spent months living in indigenous communities in Peru, the United States, and elsewhere. Finally, as a teacher, I have made ethical considerations a central part of my undergraduate and graduate courses.

Robert TrotterRobert Trotter II

I see the future of anthropology as very bright, high impact, and high potential, based on my own career and those of my close friends and associates, and even or especially on the careers of others in what might be called the loyal theoretical opposition.  I have been the very fortunate recipient of more than 60 externally funded research projects from such diverse sources as NIH, NSF, CDC, WHO, and foundations. These projects have resulted in the publication of 10 books,  15 monographs,  45 chapters in books, over 75 referred articles, and some miscellaneous other publications (reviews, poems, films, etc.).  I have served on the Board of Directors for the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA), The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), and the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology  (NAPA, President 1988-1990).  I have also twice served as chair of my anthropology department, through times of growth and challenge (which can also produce growth).  I have theoretical and pragmatic experience in forming and maintaining successful partnerships with institutions (governmental, academic, and corporate) and communities (domestic and international).  The American Anthropological Association is on an excellent trajectory to enhance anthropological science and humanistic endeavors.  I would like to be a positive part of that trajectory.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for the linguistic seat of the Committee on Ethics. The objective of the Committee on Ethics is a standing committee of the Association, which is responsible for the design and implementation of the Association’s ethics education and advisory program. The objectives of the ethics education program are (1) to increase the number of candidates for all degrees in anthropology receiving training in ethics before graduating; (2) to provide ongoing education in ethical issues for all AAA members; (3) to provide advice to AAA members facing/raising ethical dilemmas, and (4) to provide guidance to the Executive Board about AAA codes and guidelines.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Ethics.

Christopher BallChristopher Ball

The recent revision of the American Anthropological Association’s Ethics Code presents new opportunities for the Committee on Ethics’ education and advisory programs. I aim to contribute to implementation of ethics education within the discipline and beyond, as well as continuing development of ethical guidelines for professional conduct. In particular I bring to the committee expertise on the specific ethical issues raised by research involving language, including student research conducted with non-native speakers of English, professional member research in diverse sociolinguistic scenes, and the difficulties of informed consent and linguistic translation. I am a linguistic anthropologist who conducts field research with speakers of indigenous languages of Latin America and with Japanese speakers in rural Japan. My research experience has influenced my commitment to the construction of ethical models for the representation of language and other forms of expression within anthropology and in public discourse. This is reflected in my writing on endangerment of indigenous languages as well as social and political inequalities experienced by speakers of marginalized varieties of dominant state languages. I am also committed to building ethical awareness into undergraduate and graduate curriculum involving ethnographic and related research methodologies.

Steven BlackSteven Black

My scholarship, based on ethnographic research with marginalized Zulu speaking South Africans living with HIV/AIDS amid stigma, includes a focus on ethical practice in data analysis, publication, and fieldwork. In my work I have become familiar with how South Africans face stigma through language and music. These communicative processes are inherently ethical. In my scholarship I address questions of how morality and ethics are constituted in everyday lives and how neoliberal discourses shape understandings of ethical action. In addition to shared anthropological concerns about research participant anonymity, in publications I am cognizant of the problem of showing faces of people who might be stigmatized as a result. This is a difficult issue given the central use of visual materials in my data analysis. During fieldwork, I face issues such as how to truthfully represent my work to South Africans who might stigmatize research participants and questions about how the mantra “do no harm” should be interpreted in this context. I also work to contribute to the lives of the marginalized, stigmatized individuals with whom I work. I feel that linguistic anthropology offers unique viewpoints on ethics, and I would welcome the opportunity to represent these perspectives on the ethics committee.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for theundesignated seat of the Nominations Committee. Responsibilities of the Nomination Committee include:

  • To organize information regarding candidates that have been nominated for any AAA elected position (nominees can be self-nominated or by an individual or group of members of the AAA)
  • To make sure that all necessary information has been received by the committee in time for the meeting (especially proof that the nominee has agreed to run and, should s/he win, accept the position)
  • To meet annually to discuss nominations
  • To make recommendations to the Executive Board regarding the candidates for each position
  • To utilize the specific guidelines established by the Executive Board when making recommendation

Click here to learn more about the Nominations Committee.

Barbara LeMasterBarbara LeMaster

I would like the opportunity to serve on the nominations committee. My broad interests include a professional AAA membership, and membership in various AAA sections and interest groups (American Ethnological Society, Council on Anthropology and Education, Society for Linguistic Anthropology, Society for the Anthropology of Europe, Society for Visual Anthropology, Anthropology of Children and Childhood Interest Group, Human Sexuality and Anthropology Interest Group, Interest Group for the Anthropology of Public Policy, and Interest Group on NGOs and Nonprofits). My training is in the four-fields (undergraduate and M.A.), with specialization in linguistic anthropology for the PhD, and a post-doctoral fellowship in medical anthropology. I have held several leadership positions, including CSULB Anthropology Department Chair. Previously I served on the COSWA committee, was one of the authors of the “Academic Climate Report of the Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology” (2008), and on the advisory committee to the 2010 report, “The Changing Face of Anthropology: Anthropology Masters Reflect on Education, Careers, and Professional Organizations”. I have received federal (NSF) and private funding (e.g., Spencer Foundation), and secured an endowment for our department. In short, I have broad-based academic and non-academy anthropology-related work experiences that may serve well in this position.

Tulasi SrinivasTulasi Srinivas

From 2007-2011 I was on the board of the New England Maritimes region of the American Academy of Religion, ending as its President, and I realized that true leadership is crucial. Its capacity must be cultivated if an organization is to grow dynamically. My experiences as an AAA member has led me to understand that identifying, assessing and recommending strong, emergent and experienced candidates with character, while giving full consideration to the scholarly diversity, the planning goals, and the leadership needs of the Association is pivotal to the growth and welfare of the organization. I am deeply committed to understanding the solutions, the effective discussions, and workings of the various committees while encouraging diverse voices and skills to best serve on them. I see building an excellent slate of candidates as a subtle exercise in finding harmony of experienced solutions and challenging new ideas simultaneously. Attending to best processes towards the balance of skills, experience, independence and knowledge to support the Nominations Committee towards fulfillment of its goals is fundamental. If elected  I will bring this perspective to the Nominations Committee, and I hope to fulfill all my duties and obligations with trust, confidentiality and humour.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for the archaeology seat of the Nominations Committee. Responsibilities of the Nomination Committee include:

  • To organize information regarding candidates that have been nominated for any AAA elected position (nominees can be self-nominated or by an individual or group of members of the AAA)
  • To make sure that all necessary information has been received by the committee in time for the meeting (especially proof that the nominee has agreed to run and, should s/he win, accept the position)
  • To meet annually to discuss nominations
  • To make recommendations to the Executive Board regarding the candidates for each position
  • To utilize the specific guidelines established by the Executive Board when making recommendation

Click here to learn more about the Nominations Committee.

Rani AlexanderRani Alexander

As a Mesoamerican archaeologist and ethnohistorian, I welcome the opportunity to serve as the Archaeology Seat of the AAA Nominations Committee. I am deeply committed to equitable representation of the diverse subdisciplines, research specializations, and practical applications within anthropology. I will strive for greater balance within the leadership of the association among anthropologists who work in academic, applied, and international contexts. From 2006-2008 I served as Archaeology Division (AD) Secretary and worked with members of the AD nominations committee to recommend candidates for the AD and the AAA Executive Board electoral slates. I also served as the contributing editor for the AD to Anthropology News. Currently I am a member of the AD Nominations Committee. I am also a member of the Committee on the Americas/Comité de las Américas, charged to make recommendations to the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) Executive Board concerning ways to enhance the society’s effectiveness in its international engagement throughout the Americas. In addition, I have served as program committee member for both the SAA and the American Society for Ethnohistory. I look forward to working closely with the members of the AAA Executive Board and the AAA staff to maintain strong leadership within the organization.

Helen PollardHelen Pollard

I have previously served the Archaeology Division, AAA, as as member of the Nominations Committee, 2003-2007, and as member and then Chair, Kidder Award Committee 2007-2008. Following this I have served as a member on the Committee on the Americas, 2008-2013, of the Society for American Archaeology. Professional societies can function only by service and the process of nominations is critical to representing the membership at all levels. For archaeology within the AAA this has never been more crucial.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for the cultural seat of the Nominations Committee. Responsibilities of the Nomination Committee include:

  • To organize information regarding candidates that have been nominated for any AAA elected position (nominees can be self-nominated or by an individual or group of members of the AAA)
  • To make sure that all necessary information has been received by the committee in time for the meeting (especially proof that the nominee has agreed to run and, should s/he win, accept the position)
  • To meet annually to discuss nominations
  • To make recommendations to the Executive Board regarding the candidates for each position
  • To utilize the specific guidelines established by the Executive Board when making recommendation

Click here to learn more about the Nominations Committee.

Kathleen Fine-DareKathleen Fine-Dare

If elected to the Nominations Committee (Cultural Seat) I would make every effort to encourage members from small anthropology programs and from underrepresented backgrounds to become involved in AAA governance.  I believe it is particularly important to draw in sociocultural anthropologists who have significant four+ field knowledge and experience with both scholarly and publicly engaged interactions so that the association may become better connected internally.  Because I have three decades of college teaching and faculty governance experience in areas of internal and external peer evaluation, scholarly collaboration, and interaction with colleagues both within and outside the Americas, my network of colleagues and experience is broad and centripetal.  I have served several times on the Fulbright national undergraduate review committee and currently evaluate grant proposals for Wenner Gren.  I am or have recently been a member of several AAA sections (e.g., ABA, AES, AFA, AIA, CMA, SCA, SLACA, SUNTA, SVA, and GAD/FOSAP), and have organized and delivered five AAA panels.  For these and other reasons I believe I have a broad enough vision of the cultural anthropological wing of the AAA and the ways it intersects with the other subfields to serve well as a member of the NC.

Richard ChaconRichard Chacon

I feel that I am qualified to serve on the Nominations Committee’s Cultural Seat for the following reasons: I have served on numerous university wide committees, as well as promotion and tenure review panels. I have organized sessions at the AAAs in 2009, 2005, and in 2003.
I am fully supportive of the AAA’s efforts at promoting anthropological perspectives and the autonomy of native peoples. As a result of such concerns, in 1995, I founded the non-profit “Alto Corrientes Health Care Fund” in order to help Amazonian Achuar peoples meet their health care needs. Since, 2009 to the present, I serve on the Board of Directors overseeing the International Center of York County (ICYC) which provides immigrants with the tools needed for becoming independent and productive members of the community. I also organize events for the “No Room for Racism Taskforce” designed to promote mutual respect and understanding among all community residents. Additionally, since 2004, I serve as Project Anthropologist the “The Catawba Nation Research Project” which supports efforts promoting tribal autonomy. Lastly, I bring years of dedication as a field anthropologist working with indigenous communities along with a steadfast commitment to the AAA as our flagship organization.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for the Section Assembly Executive Board  Seat: Deborah Pellow and Ramona Perez.

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Deborah PellowDeborah Pellow

My work is specifically socio-cultural but I am strongly committed to the interconnectivity of anthropology’s sub-fields and interdisciplinary studies. Three approaches predominate in my research: gender, ethnicity and space/place studies, cross-cut by politics. Early in my career, I worked as an applied anthropologist in Chicago, but my primary geographic area is Ghana. Currently my focus is the bridge generation of Dagomba educated elite relocated to Accra, their attachment to the hometown area and its consequences. The AAA faces enormous challenges ahead as the interests of new academic and lay publics become more consequential to anthropological inquiry. Robust section assembly participation in AAA governance, to which I am committed, will help reposition the discipline. As president of SUNTA, I enjoyed working with other section leaders. The new role for a representative of the Section Assembly on the Executive Board will be very useful in bringing issues under discussion in the Section Assembly directly to the EB and vice versa. It will strengthen the section organization in general and facilitate the robust exercise of governance for the entire organization. I work well with others – I was successful as the Program Chair and then President of SUNTA – and would enjoy the opportunity to engage with the Executive Board on behalf of the Section Assembly.

DP, Nidia and Nadia at Magdalena's Quincenera 2008Ramona Perez

I have served on the SLACA board for the last 15 years, most recently (2008-2013) in the roles of President (elect – past).  I consider my greatest accomplishments to be shared governance between the Board and its members, collaborations with other Societies and Associations, and in creating new avenues for recognition of our emerging scholars.  I have served on the Labor Commission for the EB (2008-2012) and in the Presidents’ Working Group that redefined governance for the SA.  A key outcome of the Working Group was transparency and shared governance through active participation in the EB; this seat is one of two that resulted from our work.  I have a strong background in governance, ethics, and collaboration as evidenced through my research agenda, service to the AAA and in my roles as Chair of the IRB for SDSU, Chair of the University Graduate Curriculum Cmtee, and in my administrative roles as director of two academic programs.  If elected to represent the SA, I will continue to strive for shared governance, fair and equitable representation of the SA and its constituencies through collaboration, and in closing the communication gap over differing needs between the EB, SA, and our shared constituencies.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for Executive Board Practicing/Professional Seat: Elizabeth Briody and Teresita Majewski.

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Elizabeth BriodyElizabeth Briody

One issue AAA faces is attracting and retaining practitioners.  More needs to be done to understand and implement offerings and membership benefits of interest to them – particularly career development.  AAA practitioners could serve as liaisons between the AAA and specific graduate programs, extending an invitation for AAA membership, providing introductions to members, and getting students and recent graduates involved in section committees and association initiatives. We also could learn why practitioners leave the AAA by asking them.  I have extensive experience in linking practitioners to academia and to AAA.  I am an adjunct professor at four universities.  Since 2009, I have served on the AAA’s Committee on Practicing, Applied, and Public Interest Anthropology (CoPAPIA) where I worked on improving the preparation of anthropology graduates for the non-academic job market.  In addition, I have been actively involved in addressing practitioner needs within the AAA for 25 years, including serving as NAPA President, co-founding the NAPA Mentor Program, and creating the awards-winning AAA video Anthropologists at Work: Careers Making a Difference. These experiences would help navigate the complexities of the AAA’s practitioner challenge.  I would like to bring my energy, perspective, and creativity to the AAA Executive Board’s Practicing/Professional seat.

Teresita_MajewskiTeresita Majewski

I have been a member of AAA since graduate school and have spent my entire career as a practicing professional. My service to the AD and other organizations has provided me with relevant experience and the skills to be an effective board member. As president of the American Cultural Resources Association (ACRA), which represents 150 U.S. firms and more than 3,000 employees, and in private sector heritage management, I have dealt with the full range of issues that affect practicing professionals in business environments, including best practices, ethics, human resources, client relations, finances, and professional development. Under my leadership, ACRA has increased membership, developed an effective government relations program, provided continuing education opportunities for members, and strengthened ties with sister professional organizations. I have been active in NAPA initiatives, including the Career Expo, and taught a stress-management workshop for students and young professionals. If elected, I am committed to representing practicing professional anthropologists wherever they are working and to encouraging the AAA to endorse academic and other programs and opportunities for young professionals and students who want to become practicing professionals. By doing so, the AAA can further expand the reach and relevance of anthropology to its members and beyond.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for Executive Board Minority Seat: Sonya Atalay and Bernard Perley.

Members of the AAA Executive Board (EB) help to set the vision and strategic direction of the association, safeguard the organization’s assets, and ensure the fiscal, legal and ethical integrity of the association. EB members also translate the shared values and interests of the members into organizational plans and programs, determine desired organizational outcomes, and assess progress in achieving those outcomes. Click here for complete position details.

Sonya_AtalaySonya Atalay

Like many of us, perhaps, two things drew me to anthropology: intellectual curiosity about human behavior and a deep-rooted concern about the problems and injustices apparent in our world. As a Native American, I walked through the door of anthropology with a healthy dose of skepticism about the disciplines’ ability to achieve its aims of understanding all aspects of human society in ways that ‘do no harm’ while at the same time increasing public understanding; putting knowledge to work to solve real world problems; and even addressing injustices. Within the AAA we set high goals for our profession, and I think it’s important to maintain a critical gaze about what anthropology is, where the discipline’s headed, and where work remains. Some of the challenges I see for anthropology are internal, others require us to reframe and reassert our relevance to multiple external audiences. I will bring to the Executive Board leadership experiences as a member of the AAA Committee on Minority Issues as well as in chairing and as a member of Society for American Archaeology committees. I have familiarity with public policy as a member of the National NAGPRA Review Committee, and a commitment to engaged research crossing two sub-fields, both cultural anthropology and archaeology.

Bernard PerleyBernard Perley

I, Bernard Perley, am asking for your vote to become your Minority Seat representative on the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association.  As a Native American and an anthropologist I am committed to making the American Anthropological Association a professional organization that welcomes and encourages minority participation at all levels.  Having served as an officer for SANA and AIA I am aware of the need to address issues of race and racism in anthropology.  As your representative for the Minority Seat I promise to work toward increasing the presence and participation of minority voices and visions in Anthropology.  I promise to work closely with current Executive Board members and I promise to take a leadership role as we help all our minority scholars find their professional voices in anthropology. I also promise to serve all my fellow anthropologists as we collectively identify productive and promising paths toward greater minority representation and professional development. This is an exciting time for our organization as increasing numbers of young minority scholars seek professional careers in anthropology and I look forward to welcoming them into an inclusive professional community.   I hope to do so by serving as your Minority Seat representative.  Thank you.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

It’s time to vote in the 2013 elections. Log-in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates. Today’s feature are the candidates for President-Elect: Deborah Nichols and Alisse Waterston

The responsibilities of the President-Elect include:

  1. Serves as Chair of the Long Range Planning committee.
  2. Represents AAA at the President’s request.
  3. In the absence of the President, fulfills those duties as noted in the President’s job description.
  4. Carries out such other duties as may be assigned by the President or by the Executive Board.
  5. Serves as an ex-officio member of AAA committees (excluding nominations committee).

Click here for complete position details.

Deb NicholsDeborah Nichols

My work as an anthropologist and engagement with the AAA has been shaped by being part of a four-field anthropology department throughout my career that began doing contract archaeology. Being an anthropologist extends the intellectual breadth of my archaeological research on political economy, early states, and urbanism. The breadth of anthropology is both its greatest strength and greatest challenge. The AAA publication program provides an umbrella for anthropology’s rich variety. It should be the foremost vehicle to engage and present new anthropological understandings and knowledge and to speak to broader audiences within and beyond our discipline. If we see change as an opportunity, digital technology offers possibilities to enrich our publications, sustain their diversity and expand access as we address financial challenges. I would bring to the Presidency a broad and international engagement with anthropology, first-hand knowledge of the association, and leadership experience. I have been elected as section president and Section Assembly Convener, and I have chaired the Association’s Operating Committee and the Committee for the Future and Print and Electronic Publishing. I have served on editorial boards including for American Anthropologist, the Annual Review of Anthropology, the Society for Economic Anthropology, and Ancient Mesoamerica.

Alisse WaterstonAlisse Waterston

I would welcome the responsibility to lead AAA through the next period as it engages new possibilities in scholarly publishing, faces labor and funding crises in higher education, and more fully participates in public and policy discussions.  My leadership roles—Executive Board, ACC Chair, CFPEP Chair, Editor/Open Anthropology, Annual Meeting Program Chair, SANA Board—have provided me deep understanding of the association, and the concerns and aspirations of members and sections.  My various roles as an academic, applied, and activist anthropologist have prepared me for the challenges ahead. I consider the following issues key: 1) the future of scholarly publishing; 2) relationships and communication—internal to the association and external to AAA; 3) the labor market for anthropologists, contingent labor practices, graduate student opportunities, and prospects for applied, practicing anthropologists; 4) the future of the annual meeting, including principles to guide decisions related to it; and 5) anthropology’s role in the political, economic and social crises of our times, including militarism, poverty, and inequality. I will build on the achievements of past leadership to further the discipline’s global and local ties, and foster anthropology as an intellectual, creative and innovative discipline inside and outside the academy. I would be honored to lead the effort on these important issues, and would do so with great energy and enthusiasm.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

2013 AAA Elections Going on Now

Photo courtesy of WDET

Photo courtesy of WDET

It’s time to cast your vote in the 2013 AAA Elections.

The ballot is open. AAA members can log-in through AnthroGateway and click on the VOTE NOW button to access the ballots in which you are eligible to vote. The ballot will remain open until  May 31st at 5pm EST.

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