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It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on World Anthropologies Undesignated Seat #9: Hsain Ilahiane and Kathleen O’Connor.

Committee member objectives are to identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations, to develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally, and to engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on World Anthropologies.

 

Hsain Ilahiane

Ilahiane_HsainI value the charge to and the objectives of the Committee on World Anthropologies and would be honored to serve on the committee as it endeavors to meet its mandate. I would like to work within this committee to:
1. foster deeper international collaboration;
2. promote the visibility of the theoretical and applied work of global south anthropologists;
3. explore ways to get global south students to attend, organize, and present at the AAA meetings; and
4. work to establish a global AAA presence in the form of online chapters.
I would like to leverage this opportunity to open the doors of the AAA to the world. I bring a set of world research experiences and networks to this seat. I carry out my research in Morocco and my areas of theoretical interest are development, poverty, globalization, economic anthropology, and political ecology throughout the Middle East. I have also carried out applied research in the United States, Mexico, Kenya, Uganda, and South Africa. I was a visiting senior social scientist at Intel Corporation in 2006-2007, and I have presented my work at conferences in the United States, Europe, Japan, and Africa.

Kathleen O’Connor

O'Connor_KathleenMy platform has two “planks”: the first is the issue of translation. I believe it is essential for anthropologists to translate our work and make it accessible to those with whom we have conducted fieldwork. I would strongly encourage AAA anthropologists to present research at conferences abroad, particularly in the host country. I have had the opportunity or presenting my Brazilian research in Brazil, in Portuguese, and it was an amazing experience to receive feedback from Brazilian colleagues. I believe that presenting our work to our hosts completes the ethnographic process by reporting what we learned, and allowing space for challenges, to make sure we get it right.
The second plank in my platform also follows the committee’s mandate to encourage global anthropologists to visit the US and present their work. If elected, I will work assiduously to find ways of facilitating this exchange through funding opportunities and networking. This year I participated on a panel at AAA attended by one of the top scholars in my research area, who came from the Netherlands. It was very exciting to meet someone I had been citing for years. Finally, increased interaction with global scholars serves a 21st century anthropology, which must adopt a fully global gaze.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on World Anthropologies Undesignated Seat #8: Theodore Bestor and Sandra Lopez Varela.

Committee member objectives are to identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations, to develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally, and to engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on World Anthropologies.

 

Theodore Bestor

Bestor_TedThroughout my career I have worked to expand close ties and collaborations among North American anthropologists and communities of anthropologists in East Asia. I was the founding president of the Society for East Asian Anthropology, and recently the President of the Association for Asian Studies. My goals are to promote greater degrees of communication and mutual interaction among scholars in diverse parts of the world and to encourage ways in which the AAA can facilitate ties to other anthropological organizations and academic communities.

Sandra Lopez Varela

Lopez Varela_SandraIn holding the archaeology chair at the Executive Board of the AAA, I have further the association’s efforts to expand a dialogue with our sister organizations to protect human rights and people’s heritage in these violent times around the world. This is not the first time in my professional career, that I have been given the responsibility to represent the values and interests of our academic community, without the frontiers of our geopolitical borders. Knowing and living the challenges that threshold and stronger economies face in today’s world has given me the opportunity to demonstrate to governments and institutions around the world, the benefits of increasing their financial support to research and education in the social sciences. In this context, we have worked ethically together to unite our worlds of knowledge for the benefit of our disciplines and society in general. Through these international dialogues, I have enhanced to those unfamiliar with the reach of anthropology that creating sustainable and responsible social models requires of its many approaches. It will be a great honor if I could have the opportunity to serve the CWA.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Labor Relations Undesignated Seat #2: Michael Duke and Lavanya Proctor.

Committee member responsibilities include:

• To provide the AAA Executive Board and AAA Meetings Department information about labor conditions relevant to the EB’s decisions about the scheduling of AAA annual meetings at the earliest possible stage of decision-making.
• To provide the AAA Executive Board information about labor conditions relevant to other EB decisions in regard to vendors and subcontractors, to the extent that it is feasible to do so.
• To seek information exchanges with other scholarly associations in regard to the above.
• To communicate regularly with the leadership of the EB, ACC, and AOC regarding significant issues relevant to the CLR’s charge.
• To provide the AAA membership with information about labor conditions relevant to anthropologists through such means as panels, meetings, and articles in the Anthropology Newsletter.
• When appropriate to provide the EB with information about labor conditions relevant to the employment of anthropologists and to advise them about possible positions and actions they might consider with respect to that information.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Labor Relations.

Michael Duke

Duke_MichaelAcross North America, workers and their families face stagnant wages, exploitative and unsafe working conditions, discrimination, and challenges to their right to organize. Workers in the hospitality industry are particularly vulnerable to these abusive labor practices. If elected to the Committee on Labor Relations, I will work tirelessly to ensure that the treatment of workers continues to play a central role in AAA’s event planning and purchasing decisions, and in the administration of the organization itself. Likewise, given the number of anthropologists employed as adjuncts, I will advocate for enhancing the Committee’s collaborative efforts with the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, in order to address the labor conditions of contingent faculty. Finally, in light of the critical mass of anthropologists working outside of academia, I will propose that a survey be developed to inform the AAA leadership about these members’ unique labor issues and concerns. I thank you for your support.

Lavanya Proctor

Proctor_LavanyaMy interests lie in the relationship between privileged forms of knowledge or statuses and access to socioeconomic opportunities, and in how this relationship perpetuates social inequalities. In today’s anthropological world, these inequities are reflected in the differences in the work situations between tenure-line and contingent faculty. These differences, in turn, profoundly affect the personal and professional lives of adjunct and contingent faculty. I am an active advocate, online and offline, for anthropology contingent faculty. I believe that the AAA’s efforts toward equity in labor issues must focus more on our own community, and I have been working with AAA leadership to address these issues. As a 2013 AAA Leadership Fellow, I gained insight into the workings of AAA governance. This fellowship also gave me the opportunity to advocate for contingent anthropologists at the 2013 meetings. If given the opportunity, I would like to be able to continue this advocacy more effectively from within the AAA leadership.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Public Policy Undesignated Seat #4: Jill Koyama and Sarah Ono.

Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  2. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  3. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
  4. To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Jill Koyama

Koyama_JillI study public policy as a field of activity, offering a cultural analysis that captures the complexity of policy processes. These ethnographic investigations are situated across three strands of inquiry. They are: the productive social assemblages of policy and practices; the controversies of globalizing policy; and the politics of language and newcomer policy. My research focus has moved from policy explicitly created to influence schooling, to the macroeconomic regulations and transnational maneuverings, such as immigration policy, that continue to impact the inequities in education and society.
I am also committed to bringing anthropological perspectives to bear on public policy dialogues. In 2013, at a conference entitled “The Future of Anthropology and Education” at Teachers College, I spoke about this commitment. In addition, I am utilizing social and popular media to reach a broader audience. Recently, an OpEd, based on my three-year study of refugees, was published in The Huffington Post. Follow me on Twitter @Koyamawonders.

A member of AAA, and the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE) since 2003, I have recently joined the newly-formed Association for Anthropology of Policy (ASAP). I am also an associate editor of Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), the journal of CAE.

Sarah Ono

Ono~SarahIf working for the federal government has taught me one thing, it is that there are drawbacks to working in silos. When I joined the VA, the pervasive reference to “silos” was a relatively foreign concept, with my strongest association being the skyline in rural America. As anthropologists I hope that we bring the holism of our methodology to our professional practice and I see CoPP as a way to support this. I value anthropology and anthropologists. We do something unique, important, and potentially powerful. Where we fall short is when we fail to engage outside of our discipline in open-minded and open-hearted ways – whatever these may prove to be. In 2011, I began co-editing a monthly column for Anthropology News, “Anthropology in the Public Sector”, as a way to strengthen connections between working as a public servant and maintaining my involvement with colleagues on theoretical and professional issues. I am invested in being an anthropologist, I am interested in serving my professional community, and I have seen how policy development is a dynamic process. If the counter to silos is bridges, then I aspire to be a bridge builder and CoPP Undesignated Seat #4 is a good place to start. Thank you for your consideration and your support.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Public Policy Undesignated Seat #2: Susan Coutin and Francis MacManamon.

Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  2. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  3. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
  4. To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Susan Coutin

Coutin_SusanHaving been president of the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology from 2011-2013, I am committed to discovering new ways that anthropological findings can be communicated in ways that impact policy decisions. The 2012 APLA business meeting featured a discussion of the forms that public anthropology can take in the current political climate, as well as career panels focusing on both academic and practicing careers. At the 2013 AAA meeting, APLA also sponsored a workshop on genres of public writing, and I participated in a public policy forum on U.S. immigration detention and deportation. My own research examines U.S. immigration policy and I have adopted an engaged approach by collaborating with legal service providers while doing fieldwork. On my own campus (UC Irvine), I was the founding director of the UCI Center for Law, Society and Culture, so I have experience organizing workshops and colloquia, and I am also Associate Dean of the Graduate Division, a position that enables me to publicize the public impact of doctoral students’ research. If elected to the American Anthropological Association’s Committee on Public Policy, I will work to enhance our members’ abilities to articulate the policy implications of their research in ways that bring anthropological work to new audiences.

Francis MacManamon

MacManamon_FrancisI have worked throughout my professional career for public agencies, first at the state-level and then for over thirty years for the National Park Service at regional and national levels. The development and implementation of public policies related to anthropological, archaeological, and cultural heritage issues was a common and important aspect of the jobs that I held. It is important for anthropological and archaeological knowledge and perspectives to be reflected and well-regarded in the activities and policies of public agencies. I have dealt with career administrators, descendent communities, experts in other disciplines, political appointees, and representative of various interest groups throughout my career. These experiences provide me with a broad perspective on how public policy is shaped, what policies are likely to be effective, and how positive policy results are achieved. Clearly, anthropological and archaeological knowledge and perspectives have much to contribute to public policy. Both the humanistic and scientific perspectives and aspects of this knowledge are important. In order to have the greatest positive benefit, they must be applied appropriately and with care. I believe that my knowledge, professional experience, skills, and ability will assist the members and staff of AAA in promoting the effective use of anthropology and archaeology in public policies.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Human Rights Undesignated Seat #8: Nicholas Copeland and Alayne Unterberger.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • To assist in organizing human rights forum, sessions, workshops or other events at AAA Annual Meeting;
  • To consider and respond to cases of alleged human rights abuse;
  • To educate anthropologists on human rights;
  • To educate policy makers and others outside of anthropology on anthropology’s perspective and contributions to human rights;
  • To work in coalition with other professional and human rights organizations to promote human rights.

Click here to learn more about the Committee for Human Rights.

 

Nicholas Copeland

Copeland_NickAs an anthropologist and activist, I am attuned to the politics and anti-politics of human rights in the neoliberal present. I have studied how the violence and exploitation built into liberal socio-economic orders and corporate business models are lived by rural Mayas and Wal-Mart employees, and how communities and activists creatively appropriate human rights discourse to press political demands, articulate distinctive conceptions of justice, valorize radical difference, and imagine alternate futures. I also investigate how states and other sovereigns selectively deploy human rights discourses to justify imperial interventions, pursue profit, manage critique, and to discredit and disperse dissent, and how these strategies create trade offs between individual and political rights on the one hand, and collective and material rights on the other. In my scholarship, activism, and instruction, I affirm a vision of human rights fundamentally incompatible with routinized inequality and material deprivation and emphasize connections between structural and political violence. I believe anthropologists can and should take a prominent role in public debates about human rights. Anthropological methods and analysis are uniquely suited to show connections between diverse struggles for rights and to contextualize conflicting rights claims by illuminating their histories, ethical foundations, and often very contradictory political effects.

Alayne Unterberger

Unterberger_AlayneMy platform rests on the importance that anthropology, especially applied and practicing anthropological projects, can and should play in protecting human rights. Human rights are fundamental to civil society, yet all too often anthropologists stand witness to flagrant human rights violations that include abuses such as sexual and human trafficking, wage theft/economic abuse, physical and emotional abuse. These violations happen in the US and not just in far-away lands as is often depicted in the media. As such, anthropologists have the unique responsibility, and power, to not only highlight such abuses but also their causes, consequences and prevention. As a member of the Committee for Human Rights (Undesignated Seat #8), I propose a two-fold approach to enhancing our contributions to human rights. First, I would highlight the important contributions of fellow anthropologists and how their work – often in collaboration with non-anthropologists – results in strengthening human rights, locally and globally. Secondly, since I have learned that most of my undergraduate students do not know about the UN Declaration on Human Rights, or what is protected therein, I feel that this committee is poised to take a lead in expanding students’ knowledge and appreciation for human rights as a matter of basic local and global humanitarianism and scholarship.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Human Rights Undesignated Seat #6: Jennifer L. Burrell and David Fazzino.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • To assist in organizing human rights forum, sessions, workshops or other events at AAA Annual Meeting;
  • To consider and respond to cases of alleged human rights abuse;
  • To educate anthropologists on human rights;
  • To educate policy makers and others outside of anthropology on anthropology’s perspective and contributions to human rights;
  • To work in coalition with other professional and human rights organizations to promote human rights.

Click here to learn more about the Committee for Human Rights.

 

Jennifer L. Burrell

Although anthropology’s relationship to human rights has historically been characterized by numerous tensions, our discipline is, at the same time, uniquely situated to understand those differences, to surmount them, and to advocate for the promotion and protection of human rights to larger publics. I bring a mixture of applied and conceptual experiences to the AAA’s Committee for Human Rights, including years of consultancy with the Argentine Forensic Anthropology team, advocacy for women’s and indigenous rights, decades of solidarity with Central America and interventions to human rights scholarship. I look forward to contributing the insights gleaned through these experiences to the AAA, to building coalitions with locally-based and international NGOs and human rights organizations, and to working with fellow CfHR committee members to effectively educate the AAA at large with regard to global rights situations and our ability to respond to them effectively.

David Fazzino

I am interested in food and energy systems sustainability with a background in anthropology, law and agroecology. My work in food systems includes the right to traditional foods in State and international policy with case studies in Arizona and Alaska. My work in energy systems incudes examination of biofuel development, the heat or eat crisis in Alaska and the role of nuclear power in Ukraine’s energy future. While in law school I examined agriculture law, environmental law, and intellectual property rights to see the extent to which these aligned with international human and indigenous rights law and policy. Development has been broadly associated with a number of projects designed to advance the human condition, through careful consideration of development interventions, primarily in the context of food and energy development, I work to illustrate the unintended impacts of development, including those which run counter to contemporary understandings of human rights. I intend on working with other members of the AAA’s Committee for Human Rights to advance understandings of human rights issues for differently situated individuals, and provide direction in appropriate responses to violations amongst members of the AAA.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

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