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It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Human Rights Undesignated Seat #1: Merrill Singer and Betsy Taylor.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • To assist in organizing human rights forum, sessions, workshops or other events at AAA Annual Meeting;
  • To consider and respond to cases of alleged human rights abuse;
  • To educate anthropologists on human rights;
  • To educate policy makers and others outside of anthropology on anthropology’s perspective and contributions to human rights;
  • To work in coalition with other professional and human rights organizations to promote human rights.

Click here to learn more about the Committee for Human Rights.

 

Merrill Singer

Singer_MerillSeeking election to the Committee on Human Rights reflects my long-term involvement in research, teaching, writing and engagement in issues of social inequality and health. As a staff member of the Hispanic Health Council, a community-based research and direct service institution focused on health inequalities, the right to health (i.e., access to the resources needed to sustain wellbeing) was a core principle of our work. Consequently, we examined the structural causes of illness and sought to provide evidence that could inform rights-based struggles for improved health. This theme is reflected also in my publications, such as Drugs and Development: Global Impact on Sustainable Growth and Human Rights (Waveland 2009), Unhealthy Health Policy: A Critical Anthropological Examination (edited with Arachu Castro, Altamira Press, 2004), and The War Machine and Global Health (edited with Derrick Hodge, Roman-Littlefield, 2010). Currently, I serve on the Research on Global Health and Human Rights committee, of the Human Rights Institute, University of Connecticut. As a member of the Committee on Human Rights, I will support efforts to promote anthropological engagement with global human rights discourse, threats to human rights and justice, and debates about human rights versus alternative approaches to expanded social equity.

Betsy Taylor

Taylor_BetsyMy human rights work is grounded in decades of ethnographic and collaborative research with environmental and social justice movements in regions affected by extractive industry – particularly Central Appalachia and tribal communities in Northeast India. Universalizing rights discourses, I believe, need continual regrounding within substantive justice struggles, grounded in political ecological particularities and cultural contexts. I am collaborating with grassroots networks to conduct participatory action research that draws on international law and human rights discourses, for ‘bottom-up’ policy-making for transition from extraction-dependent regional economies (primarily coal and timber). A year ago, the Secretary of the US Dept of Interior appointed me to the steering committee of the US Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative. My recent research particularly focuses on emerging cross-regional dialogues in bottom-up policy in land rights, and community-based management of commons, including efforts to develop ‘community protocols’ to integrate customary law into national and international law. I have worked for three years, with the Human Rights and Social Justice Committee of the Society for Applied Anthropology. I believe that anthropology can play a unique and crucial role in national and international human rights circles – especially around questions of climate justice.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Undesignated Seat #3: Purnima Mankekar and Kristin Yarris.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Purnima Mankekar

Mankekar_PurnimaMy research is in the anthropology of gender and my career displays the convergence of my scholarship and activism. I have invested a great deal of energy at both my institutions, Stanford (1993-2006) and UCLA (2007-present), in monitoring and advocating for greater gender equity at all levels. I am committed to mentoring women students, students of color, and my junior women colleagues, and have a proven track record in this regard. I am a member of the UCLA senate as well as of the UC-wide senate where I monitor and advocate for gender equity, particularly with reference to women of color and queer/transgender students and faculty. I am now ready to apply my knowledge and experience to contexts wider than my home institution. As a long-standing member of the AAAs, I am excited about an opportunity to get more involved in the functioning of the organization, especially with regards to equity within our discipline. Being appointed to the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology will provide me with a terrific opportunity to do so. I look forward to being part of a team that is committed to working on gender equity issues in our discipline over the long term.

Kristin Yarris

Yarris_KristinI am committed to gender equity within our discipline and would use my research skills, professional experience and institutional position to help advance the CoGEA’s objectives. I believe the CoGEA should advocate for gender equity at various institutional levels within our discipline by working with students, tenure-track and non tenure-track faculty, administrative staff, practicing anthropologists and AAA governing bodies. I am committed to inclusivity in our discipline more broadly and support CoGEA’s efforts to achieve parity and equity for sexual, racial, ethnic, social class, and cultural minorities as well as for people living with disabilities. I would help advance CoGEA’s efforts to advocate for gender equity by researching the policies advanced by faculty and staff unions and other advocacy efforts and would seek to disseminate this information widely to AAA membership and beyond through the CoGEA. Other ideas I have for achieving gender parity within our discipline include advocating for family-friendly and healthy workplaces through leave and benefits policies, expanding institutional support for caregivers of dependent relatives, and monitoring gender disparities in specific outcomes such as time-to-tenure or ratio of tenured to non-tenured faculty in order to remedy these disparities.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Undesignated Seat #1: Maxine Oland and Sarah Surface Evans.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Maxine Oland

Oland_MaxineWhile our discipline claims some expertise in understanding the role of gender in cultures and institutions around the world, many anthropologists continue to face inequities in our own professional settings. My interest in serving on CoGEA is inspired by my personal experience–as an academic, an adjunct professor, and a mother–and by my conversations with young colleagues, who tell me stories of sexual harassment, and gender and sexuality-based discrimination across all subfields. My work with the Committee On The Status of Women in Archaeology (Society for American Archaeology) has brought attention to issues of motherhood and mentorship within the sub-discipline of archaeology. I seek a position on CoGEA to increase gender parity across anthropology more broadly. I am particularly interested in the ways that gender inequality intersects with class, race, ethnic identification, age, and sexuality, with life choices/ realities such as parenthood and marriage status, and with structural factors in our academic and professional institutions. Inequalities can be experienced at any level of career, but are of particular concern for young scholars and recent graduates, whose lack of professional power and mentorship puts them at the greatest risk of exploitation.

Sarah Surface Evans

Surface-Evans_SarahAs a female archaeologist, who has worked in the private sector, government, and academia, I have encountered many situations that underscore the immense work that remains to be done to ensure gender equity in our discipline. In 2011, I organized a round table (LEGACIES, SHIFTING REALITIES, AND (RE)INVENTING ROLES FOR WOMEN IN ARCHAEOLOGY) with Misty Jackson for the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association to initiate a frank and open discussion of gender bias and discrimination in archaeology. One of the outcomes of the round table was the creation of the Feminist Voices in Archaeology Blog, which is an online forum for sharing stories, creating a community, and building mentorship. While the blog has been somewhat successful, participation has been much less than we hoped for. It is all too clear to me that even anonymous digital spaces are not safe enough for this discussion. Consequently, I wish to serve on CoGEA in order to be able to foster a safe environment within the discipline and promote positive change in the anthropological community. To start, I would like to see the development of an AAA-sanctioned online forum and to use social media to increase mentorship and communication.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Student Seat: Holly Okonkwo and Tony Pomales.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Holly Okonkwo

Okonkwo_HollyIt is my pleasure to be selected as a candidate to run on the 2014 spring ballot for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Student Seat. I am running on the grounds of my intellectual and pedagogical commitment to foster diversity and more inclusive environments within the discipline and academy. Anthropology helped make the connections between the personal and the political by giving me the tools to not only understand my own positionality but also to question power relations, knowledge production and to confront discrimination. The field has allowed me to develop a voice when I often felt silenced and invisible. I am firmly committed to a career dedicated to exploring the experiences of women from diverse backgrounds and understanding how those experiences may better inform the discourse on institutions and diversity. As a member of the committee, I will utilize that same passion and commitment in supporting the mission of the American Anthropological Association in its pursuit of greater gender equity in the discipline and beyond.

Tony Pomales

Pomales_TonyThe AAA Committee on Gender Equity represents anthropology’s continued efforts toward collectively building an equitable research and work environment for all anthropologists, and also its commitment to creating and fostering equitable gender relations beyond the academy. This commitment requires a vision of gender as intersectional, so that accounts of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and other sites of difference-making factor into how gender is understood to be socially constructed and lived; thus making the committee more sensitive and alert to various forms of gender violence. My education in transnational feminism and critical race theory has prepared me to meet the responsibilities of this student seat. My graduate certification in Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies also has prepared and challenged me to formulate pedagogies for addressing issues of gender inequity in the classroom and in other settings. My dissertation research and work with aging sex worker-identified women in Costa Rica has also challenged me to develop a more critical understanding and awareness of gender discrimination and sexual abuse and the workings of power and violence, more broadly. Closer to home, my personal commitment to gender equity and social justice has also informed my work with students at a local high school who participate in a Gay Straight Alliance.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Ethics Committee Biological Seat: Julie Lesnik and Bethany Turner

The objective of the Committee on Ethics is a standing committee of the Association, which is responsible for the design and implementation of the Association’s ethics education and advisory program. The objectives of the ethics education program are (1) to increase the number of candidates for all degrees in anthropology receiving training in ethics before graduating; (2) to provide ongoing education in ethical issues for all AAA members; (3) to provide advice to AAA members facing/raising ethical dilemmas, and (4) to provide guidance to the Executive Board about AAA codes and guidelines.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Ethics.

 

Julie Lesnik

Lesnik_JulieI have a broad professional history in anthropology, which has furnished me with the experience necessary for a position on the Ethics Committee. I have taught at many different schools in Chicago including small, private establishments, large research-driven public universities, and a minority-serving institute. The student body as well as the faculty at every type of school faces their own challenges. Having worked in many different academic environments, I have an understanding of the challenges that need to be overcome in order to implement ethics training in various anthropology curricula. I have also worked on four field schools on three different continents. I have experience navigating many ethics problems that can present themselves in these settings, such as research team power dynamics, relations with local populations, and ethical treatment of human remains. I am able to advise AAA members who may be currently encountering these issues. Finally, I have been active in the AAA since 2008 and I look forward to contributing more in the years to come. Serving on the Ethics Committee would be a great way to engage with the membership and help promote awareness of the ethical dilemmas we all face in our chosen field.

Bethany Turner

Turner_BethanyI am a social bioarchaeologist working primarily in the Peruvian Andes to study patterns of diet, mobility, health, and identity among indigenous groups who lived in ancient imperial states such as the Wari and Inca, and under Spanish colonialism. I have also collaboratively studied human remains from archaeological contexts in Middle Woodland-Period Florida, Medieval Mongolia, Early-Christian Sudanese Nubia, and Emancipation-Period Georgia. All of these research contexts involved explicit and sustained efforts to engage in context-specific best practices, from excavation to compliance with NAGPRA and museum policies, to engagement with descent communities, to ongoing dialog regarding intrusive analysis and repatriation.

My training involved a strong and consistent focus on skeletal ethics and public engagement, which I now infuse into training and mentoring students in the field and lab. I believe that studying human remains is a privilege, one that imparts a heavy responsibility on the researcher to commit to the nuanced and dynamic nature of ethical practices. Because of this, I have published peer-reviewed book chapters centered on the ongoing negotiation of ethical issues in the study of ancient human remains in the US and abroad. I would translate these experiences and perspectives into productive contributions as a member of the AAA Committee on Ethics.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Ethics Committee Archaeology Seat: Kurt Dongoske and Mary Beth Trubitt

The objective of the Committee on Ethics is a standing committee of the Association, which is responsible for the design and implementation of the Association’s ethics education and advisory program. The objectives of the ethics education program are (1) to increase the number of candidates for all degrees in anthropology receiving training in ethics before graduating; (2) to provide ongoing education in ethical issues for all AAA members; (3) to provide advice to AAA members facing/raising ethical dilemmas, and (4) to provide guidance to the Executive Board about AAA codes and guidelines.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Ethics.

 

Kurt Dongoske

Dongoske_KurtMy professional ethics are grounded and shaped by my past 24 years of working with descendant Native American tribal communities (Zuni and Hopi) on a day to day basis. I am currently the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Pueblo of Zuni, where I also run the Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise. This experience has instilled in me a deep professional ethical responsibility to both the science of archaeology and the involvement of indigenous people in the research and narratives that archaeologists and other anthropologists construct about the past. To this end, I served as the chair of the Society for American Archaeology’s Committee on Native American Relations for 6 years (1997-2003) during which time I implemented efforts to sensitize the Society’s membership to the varied issues involved in the relations between Native Americans and archaeologists. In 1994 I co-authored an article entitled, “Ethics of Field Research for the Hopi Tribe,” that was published in the Anthropology Newsletter. I believe my past experience and current understanding of the ethical issues associated with working for and with indigenous communities has prepared me to productively contribute to the Committee on Ethics.

Mary Beth Trubitt

Trubitt_MaryBethAs an archaeologist for the Arkansas Archeological Survey, I conduct research, teach and mentor university students, and engage members of the public in preservation. My research centers on American Indian history in Arkansas and the eastern United States. Communicating the results and significance of anthropological research is part of my day-to-day work. Ethical issues arise when addressing various constituencies and balancing their various interests with site protection. I try to emphasize the importance of anthropology, of archaeology, of historic preservation, and of cultural heritage as I interact with students, colleagues, volunteers, descendants, property owners, and community members. I have served on several committees for the Society for American Archaeology, and I am past president of the Caddo Conference Organization. I have been a member of the American Anthropological Association since 1991. I welcome the opportunity to bring my experience to serve the AAA and represent the membership on the Committee on Ethics. I hope to work with the committee to develop new ways to foster ethics education in the profession, to promote ethics discussions in person, in print, and via internet, and to encourage awareness of anthropological ethics issues in the public sphere.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Nominations Committee Undesignated Seat#1: Teresita Majewski and Pamela Putenney

Responsibilities of the Nomination Committee include:

  • To organize information regarding candidates that have been nominated for any AAA elected position (nominees can be self-nominated or by an individual or group of members of the AAA)
  • To make sure that all necessary information has been received by the committee in time for the meeting (especially proof that the nominee has agreed to run and, should s/he win, accept the position)
  • To meet annually to discuss nominations
  • To make recommendations to the Executive Board regarding the candidates for each position
  • To utilize the specific guidelines established by the Executive Board when making recommendation

Click here to learn more about the Nominations Committee.

Teresita Majewski

Majewski_TeresitaA member of the AAA since graduate school, I served as a member-at-large of the Archaeology Division (AD) Executive Committee and as a member and then chair of the AD Nominations Committee. The committee received high praise from AAA staff who commented that the AD had one of the most active and effective nominating processes of the AAA divisions and sections. I can bring this experience to the AAA Nominations Committee and contribute to its success. My connections cross-cut the association and include practicing anthropologists, academics, museum anthropologists, and those in government service. As current co-chair of the newly established AAA Task Force on Cultural Heritage, I am working with AAA members from a wide range of constituencies. I also have extensive international connections, both in Latin America, Canada, and overseas. I have maintained my professional connections by presenting at various national, international, and regional meetings; by publishing regularly; and through professional service to the discipline. If elected, I am committed to working with my fellow committee members to provide the highest-quality nominees to carry out the AAA’s work and to encourage younger generations of anthropologists to contribute to the association’s success through service and innovation.

Pamela Puntenney

Putenney_PammelaThe current AAA agenda is far-reaching and significant reflecting the vitality and intelligence we bring to anthropology, be it academic or practitioners working in diverse settings. The leadership required to implement our goals hinges upon recruiting talent that has the ability to engage a complex range of audiences whether addressing the importance of science in anthropology, managing publications, jobs, or locating better meeting sites. Four goals I have for nominations include: 1) Encourage people to step forward that can work to bridge AAA’s initiatives; 2) strengthen the nomination pool through public outreach and communications activities; 3) further develop a responsive capacity in terms of strong nominations; 4) strategically support efforts to sustain recruiting over the long term. If elected, I will remain committed to the kind of activities this statement of advocacy entails: support of initiatives and activities to identify a pool of potential candidates; encouragement of continuing to build recruiting efforts within AAA; seek out enthusiastic colleagues eager to bring their talent and leadership skills to the tasks at hand and of course the support and encouragement of students and young professionals. I would enjoy the opportunity to serve you as a member of AAA’s Nominations Committee.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

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