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It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Public Policy Undesignated Seat #4: Jill Koyama and Sarah Ono.

Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  2. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  3. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
  4. To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Jill Koyama

Koyama_JillI study public policy as a field of activity, offering a cultural analysis that captures the complexity of policy processes. These ethnographic investigations are situated across three strands of inquiry. They are: the productive social assemblages of policy and practices; the controversies of globalizing policy; and the politics of language and newcomer policy. My research focus has moved from policy explicitly created to influence schooling, to the macroeconomic regulations and transnational maneuverings, such as immigration policy, that continue to impact the inequities in education and society.
I am also committed to bringing anthropological perspectives to bear on public policy dialogues. In 2013, at a conference entitled “The Future of Anthropology and Education” at Teachers College, I spoke about this commitment. In addition, I am utilizing social and popular media to reach a broader audience. Recently, an OpEd, based on my three-year study of refugees, was published in The Huffington Post. Follow me on Twitter @Koyamawonders.

A member of AAA, and the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE) since 2003, I have recently joined the newly-formed Association for Anthropology of Policy (ASAP). I am also an associate editor of Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ), the journal of CAE.

Sarah Ono

Ono~SarahIf working for the federal government has taught me one thing, it is that there are drawbacks to working in silos. When I joined the VA, the pervasive reference to “silos” was a relatively foreign concept, with my strongest association being the skyline in rural America. As anthropologists I hope that we bring the holism of our methodology to our professional practice and I see CoPP as a way to support this. I value anthropology and anthropologists. We do something unique, important, and potentially powerful. Where we fall short is when we fail to engage outside of our discipline in open-minded and open-hearted ways – whatever these may prove to be. In 2011, I began co-editing a monthly column for Anthropology News, “Anthropology in the Public Sector”, as a way to strengthen connections between working as a public servant and maintaining my involvement with colleagues on theoretical and professional issues. I am invested in being an anthropologist, I am interested in serving my professional community, and I have seen how policy development is a dynamic process. If the counter to silos is bridges, then I aspire to be a bridge builder and CoPP Undesignated Seat #4 is a good place to start. Thank you for your consideration and your support.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Public Policy Undesignated Seat #2: Susan Coutin and Francis MacManamon.

Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  2. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  3. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
  4. To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Susan Coutin

Coutin_SusanHaving been president of the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology from 2011-2013, I am committed to discovering new ways that anthropological findings can be communicated in ways that impact policy decisions. The 2012 APLA business meeting featured a discussion of the forms that public anthropology can take in the current political climate, as well as career panels focusing on both academic and practicing careers. At the 2013 AAA meeting, APLA also sponsored a workshop on genres of public writing, and I participated in a public policy forum on U.S. immigration detention and deportation. My own research examines U.S. immigration policy and I have adopted an engaged approach by collaborating with legal service providers while doing fieldwork. On my own campus (UC Irvine), I was the founding director of the UCI Center for Law, Society and Culture, so I have experience organizing workshops and colloquia, and I am also Associate Dean of the Graduate Division, a position that enables me to publicize the public impact of doctoral students’ research. If elected to the American Anthropological Association’s Committee on Public Policy, I will work to enhance our members’ abilities to articulate the policy implications of their research in ways that bring anthropological work to new audiences.

Francis MacManamon

MacManamon_FrancisI have worked throughout my professional career for public agencies, first at the state-level and then for over thirty years for the National Park Service at regional and national levels. The development and implementation of public policies related to anthropological, archaeological, and cultural heritage issues was a common and important aspect of the jobs that I held. It is important for anthropological and archaeological knowledge and perspectives to be reflected and well-regarded in the activities and policies of public agencies. I have dealt with career administrators, descendent communities, experts in other disciplines, political appointees, and representative of various interest groups throughout my career. These experiences provide me with a broad perspective on how public policy is shaped, what policies are likely to be effective, and how positive policy results are achieved. Clearly, anthropological and archaeological knowledge and perspectives have much to contribute to public policy. Both the humanistic and scientific perspectives and aspects of this knowledge are important. In order to have the greatest positive benefit, they must be applied appropriately and with care. I believe that my knowledge, professional experience, skills, and ability will assist the members and staff of AAA in promoting the effective use of anthropology and archaeology in public policies.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #3 of the Committee on Public Policy (CoPP). Committee member responsibilities include:

  1. To encourage sections and interest groups to develop policy-related activities that focus on particular areas of interest to their members, such as by interacting with section leadership and visiting business meetings, without infringing on the autonomy of these units;
  1. To enhance communication and cooperation between sections, interest groups, other elected committees, task forces, the AAA Public Affairs Office, and other parts of the AAA on policy issues that cross-cut particular domains, thereby encouraging links among their individual efforts. A key mechanism for realizing this goal is working with sections, interest groups, task forces, other AAA committees, and the AAA staff in organizing events for the AAA Annual Meeting, such as policy forums, particularly those that highlight issues that cross-cut specific policy domains;
  2. To enhance the visibility of anthropological contributions to public policy to audiences outside the AAA, including by creating opportunities for AAA members to enter into policy debates as well as to bring policy makers to AAA annual meetings and other sites in which they can interact with anthropologists;
To provide models for AAA members and units of effective participation in public policy, such as by placing examples of effective policy interventions on the COPP Web site and in contributions to Anthropology News and helping organize AAA sessions in which members reflect on their policy interventions and sponsor workshops and other events in which AAA members can gain relevant skills

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Public Policy.

Chip CCChip Colwell-Chanthaphonh

Anthropology has vital perspectives to contribute to public policy. From my work on protecting sacred sites, to museum repatriation, to the human rights of 9/11 families, I have become deeply aware of how sound public policies require the translation of anthropological insights. As a member of the Committee on Public Policy, I will be a keen advocate for the many policy issues confronting the AAA, and society, such as immigration law, climate change, education, economic equality, and health care. I pledge to help achieve our discipline’s aspirations particularly by ensuring the Committee continues to focus on fostering dialogues on the most pressing issues of our times, educating policy makers about anthropological contributions, and amplifying the impacts of AAA members who work in the arenas of practicing, applied, and public interest anthropology.

Tim_WallaceTim Wallace

In my role as the President of NAPA as well as a member of the Executive Board for the SfAA, and now as a member of the Executive Committee of the AAA Section Assembly, I have been able to work closely with a range of anthropologists and anthropological perspectives in understanding the issues facing anthropology and the need to make sure anthropological perspectives are included in the key public policy issues of our day, particularly in the areas of environmental sustainability, global warming, migration rights, human rights and social justice. Anthropologists must take an active role in the major issues that confront our globalized world. While the members of the AAA talk about the importance taking a principled stand, often we do not develop a sufficiently unified voice to confront the challenges to our world. The AAA is now at a critical juncture in our history where multiple agendas and priorities are emerging that sometimes appear conflicting. We must unify around a single voice to be effective. The Public Policy Committee is the essential forum where the AAA can develop a reasoned, practical response to these challenges. I am committed to working on the effective, timely and continuous production of activities and discussions that will accomplish this goal.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Last Chance to Nominate for the new AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) Committee on Public Policy (CoPP) has established a biennial award, the AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award, to honor anthropologists whose work has had a significant, positive influence on the course of government decision-making and action. Public policy is broadly defined to include measures created by any level of government and addressing the full range of contemporary human problems. Starting this year, the award will be conferred every other year in rotation with the AAA Solon T. Kimball award. Winners will be invited to give a lecture at the AAA annual meeting where their award will be announced and they will receive $500 and a commemorative plaque.

The nomination deadline is February 1.

Click here for submission details.

New AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) Committee on Public Policy (CoPP) has established a biennial award, the AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award, to honor anthropologists whose work has had a significant, positive influence on the course of government decision-making and action. Public policy is broadly defined to include measures created by any level of government and addressing the full range of contemporary human problems. Starting this year, the award will be conferred every other year in rotation with the AAA Solon T. Kimball award. Winners will be invited to give a lecture at the AAA annual meeting where their award will be announced and they will receive $500 and a commemorative plaque.

The nomination deadline is February 1.

Click here for submission details.

Your Chance To Name An AAA Award

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) Committee on Public Policy (CoPP) has established a biennial award, the AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award, to honor anthropologists whose work has had a significant, positive influence on the course of government decision-making and action. Public policy is broadly defined to include measures created by any level of government and addressing the full range of contemporary human problems. Starting in 2013, the award will be conferred every other year in rotation with the AAA Solon T. Kimball award.

The CoPP is interested in naming the new award after a prominent anthropologist whose work in the area of public policy has contributed greatly to the discipline. If you’d like to nominate a person whom you believe the award should be named after, please send your suggestion, along with a two paragraph description of the person’s work and achievements, to publicpolicyaward@aaanet.org by July 23, 2012.

New AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) Committee on Public Policy (CoPP) has established a biennial award, the AAA Anthropology in Public Policy Award, to honor anthropologists whose work has had a significant, positive influence on the course of government decision-making and action. Public policy is broadly defined to include measures created by any level of government and addressing the full range of contemporary human problems. Starting in 2013, the award will be conferred every other year in rotation with the AAA Solon T. Kimball award.

The CoPP is interested in naming the new award after a prominent anthropologist whose work in the area of public policy has contributed greatly to the discipline. If you’d like to nominate a person whom you believe the award should be named after, please send your suggestion, along with a two paragraph description of the person’s work and achievements, to publicpolicyaward@aaanet.org by July 23, 2012.

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