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“Back to School” Field Trip to the Chicago Field Museum

Today’s guest blog post is by Kamela Heyward-Rotimi. Kamela Heyward-Rotimi is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for African and African American Research at Duke University.  She is a visiting research scholar in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Obafemi Awolowo University in Nigeria, and is an adjunct affiliate in the Department of Anthropology at University of Massachusetts at Amherst.  Her research interests include race, gender, science, digital media, and education.  She is presently working on a manuscript that looks at the impact of Internet Fraud, also known as “419” or “Yahoo-Yahoo”, in the lives of everyday Nigerian communities.

Anthropologists are reconstituting ways to communicate anthropology with communities that host our meetings. At the 112th AAA Annual Meeting, anthropologists did just that in the Anthropologists Back to School initiative.

The past two AAA annual meeting themes addressed the imagined place of anthropology and the place of anthropology in our communities in the 21st century.  In line with this reflexive inquiry of contemporary anthropology, anthropologist and public intellectual Johnnetta Betsch Cole challenged her anthropology colleagues to reach out to the youngest members of the host cities of our AAA meetings.  The program chairs for the 2013 AAA meetings, Alaka Wali and Dana-Ain Davis, responded to the challenge and invited anthropologists to participate in the Anthropologist Back to School initiative in Chicago.

Dr. Cole’s invitation to partner with her in the Anthropologists Back to School initiative brought earlier lessons of “giving back” to communities, and engaged anthropology full circle for me.   My initial consideration of what is public anthropology would occurred after Dr. Cole’s inaugural address to the student body as the President of Spelman College.  In that speech she stressed that we budding professionals and scholars had a responsibility to our West End neighbors.  She challenged each of us to get involved with community service in the West End area, the area that both the Spelman community and the West End communities shared.   Community involvement was not a new concept for me but one I largely associated with civic and grassroots organizations, not higher institutions or anthropology.  The possibility of an anthropology advocating for community development challenged my previous understandings of anthropology as an immutable discipline.  I questioned how to pair my activism with my new found interest in anthropology; I never stopped asking where a “community involved” anthropology fits within the definition of anthropology.

In many ways, questioning the positionality of anthropology in society benefits from the legacy of anthropologists across subfields who have questioned anthropology’s role in addressing societal problems (Blakey 1998; Borofsky 2005; Cole 2009; Gwaltney 1980; Harrison 1991; Mead 2004; Sanday 1976).  It is increasingly clear, both in our research and everyday lives, that current understandings of society and anthropology require anthropologists’ active contribution.  The rapid exchange of information on digitized forums and open content online encyclopedias which shape peoples’ interpretation of everyday life highlight an opportunity and responsibility for anthropologists to be a part of these conversations in multiple mediums.  The conversations at the Anthropologist Back to School initiative presented a public space to engage in conversations about anthropology with young community members.

The Anthropologist Back to School initiative involved anthropologists representing all subfields engaging with students of all ages in and around exhibits at Loyola University, The University of Illinois at Chicago’s Latino Cultural Center and The Field Museum.

At the Field Museum site I found it meaningful to talk with young students about what it means to be an anthropologist, anthropological concepts, world cultures, and how to critically digest images in popular culture.  It was especially significant to share this time with colleagues who were also engaged in sharing their narratives of anthropology, and to anxiously admit that we hoped our presentations were relevant to these very young communities of primary and secondary school learners.

At the Field Museum, anthropologists engaged with local students in connection with various presentations they had prepared on a range of topics:  racial categories and diversity, ethnographic practices and fieldwork and interviewing techniques, vernacular and contemporary African culture; African innovation through the ages; Ghanaian culture, Adinkra symbols and ideographs; and African cities.  I discovered, as did my colleagues, that it was great fun talking with groups of cross learners.

I joined Dr. Cole in the Africa exhibit for our presentation, “Africa Connected,” where we discussed African stereotypes vs. contemporary African life and digitally connected African communities.  Dr. Cole began our presentation with a critical discussion of current perceptions of Africa based on tropes of a primitive and Dark Continent. I then shared contemporary images of West Africans digitally connected through social media and various new media technologies.  Our goal was to initiate a dialogue about Africa for young learners who are far too often instructed from curricula that codifies Africa and nations of the South as subpar civilizations.  An example of this kind of instruction was shared with me by a parent whose teen age son attends a magnet high school in southeast Chicago. This student’s ninth grade history teacher said the following to his class: “Colonialists brought a gift to West Africa, the gift of reading and writing.”  Many of our discussions with student groups ranging from 5th grade through 10th grade reflected this troubling popular misunderstanding of the history of colonialism in Africa and first world/third world dichotomies that are traded as fact. It was encouraging to see that students who may well have been exposed to distorted and factually incorrect information about African people and cultures were willing to listen to ethnographic and anthropological data depicting a more complex African existence.

One of the most memorable moments for Dr. Cole and me was our conversation with a 5th grade class and their teacher Ms. West*.  The students of this 5th grade class expressed informed perspectives about the diverse and dynamic realities on the African continent. The students’ responses caused me to revise the unofficial script I found myself following when talking with previous classes.  When we asked children from other visiting classes their impressions of Africa they generally listed diversity of animals, poverty, and ‘primitive societies.’  However, when the students of Ms. West’s class were asked the question, “What do you know about Africa?” A little girl responded with little hesitation: “It is an interesting place with smart people.” Her comment was immediately followed by a fellow classmate’s observation, “And, West Africans are using the Internet.”  Because their responses differed greatly from the responses given by fellow students also educated in Chicago area schools, I assumed that Ms. West’s class was sharing information they gained outside of the classroom.  Which prompted me to break with the script and ask, “Where did you learn all of these things?”  The students unanimously replied, “Ms. West is teaching us about Africa.”  Following our presentation, I asked Ms. West to briefly speak with Dr. Cole and myself. We first commended her for presenting a perspective of Africa seldom presented at the primary level in American Public school curricula.  She said, “This perspective you all and the other anthropologists presented about Africa is not in the units I am told to cover in my class. So, I referred to sources outside of the mandated Common Core Curriculum to find information that talks about positive views of Africa.  This is a part of my lessons on world history.”  Finally, she added that she would like to incorporate these kinds of analyses in her lesson plans.  After sharing with her some websites with images of contemporary Africa, Ms. West said she was inspired to widen her search for more complex stories of other countries.

Those conversations with the students, their teachers and side debriefs with participating colleagues reinforced the importance of a responsible anthropology that gives back and assumes an active role in understandings of culture writ large and in the margins.  The Anthropologists Back to School initiative allows me to extend my community engagement to the host cities of the AAA meetings.  Coincidently, in the past year some of my own community involvement included work with students from pre-K through college both at home and abroad.  In Nigeria I spoke with recently graduated secondary school students about anthropology and demystifying notions of democratic wealth of all American citizens.  In Durham, NC I conducted an interactive presentation for pre-K through high school aged students that addressed the presence of cultural symbols in our everyday lives.  And, on my way to the 111th AAA meetings in San Francisco and during a visit to my childhood home, Los Angeles, I was invited to speak to the young women of the Women’s Leadership Project, a feminist service learning program based at two LAUSD high schools in South Los Angeles.  My topic affirmed questions I asked of anthropology as an undergraduate; I discussed the perfect fit of anthropology for women of color who are community advocates.  I look forward to the continuation of the Anthropologists Back to School initiative and opportunities for anthropologists to engage with local communities during our AAA meetings in Washington, D.C..

*pseudonym

See You Next Year!

AAA2013Thank you for participating in the 112th AAA Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL.

Safe travels as you return home.

Stay tuned for the 113th AAA Annual Meeting Call for Papers coming soon. The 113th AAA Annual Meeting will be held in Washington D.C. from December 3 to December 7, 2014.

Anthropology Matters

Mullings_LeithCome to the Waldorf Room (3rd Floor – Chicago Hilton) tonight for the AAA Presidential Address. On the topic of Anthropology Matters, AAA President Leith Mullings will begin the Address at 6:15pm.

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest – Installation today!

Have you added this Installation to your personal scheduler yet? Add this one this afternoon:

Sponsored by the Society for North American Anthropology

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest: A
Community/Activist Dialogue

In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in
receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the
funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation
brings together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community
activists in conversation. Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday, November 21  4:00-6:00 Jane Addams Hull-House Museum The
University of Illinois at Chicago 800 S. Halsted (M/C 051) Chicago, IL
60607-7017 Organizers: Molly Doane, Ida Susser, Susan Hyatt, SANA

Contact at site:
Molly Doane mdoane@uic.edu

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

The panel includes:
Ida Susser: Introduction

Andy Newman: (Wayne State University): The Crisis in Detroit

Jane Collins (UW-Madison): The Madison uprising

Adrienne Alexander (AFSCME): Chicago perspectives

Jamie Owen Daniel (field service director for the Illinois Federation of
Teachers and Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies): Chicago perspectives

Jim Field (Chicago Coalition for the Homeless)

Christine Noschese (Filmmaker): Clips from Metropolitan Avenue

The event will take place in the Hull House dining hall, where Jane Addams
shared ideas with the leading labor organizers, activists, and
intellectuals of her day. The Hull House Museum features innovative
exhibits that connect the social concerns and activism of today to the
political issues of the early twentieth Century. “Redefining Democracy:
Jane Addams and the Hull House Settlement” and “Unfinished Business: Home
Economics in the 21st Century” will be open 10am-4PM for those interested
in visiting before the event

Tonight’s the Night! AAA Plenary Session – ReImagining Education

Tonight is the Plenary Session! Below is a repost of the special message written by Plenary guest, Malcolm London:

Today’s guest blog post is by Malcolm London. London called the Gil-Scott Heron of this generation by Cornel West, is a young Chicago poet, activist & educator. Malcolm appears on PBS for the first TED Talk television program with John Legend & Bill Gates. Malcolm has shared stages with actor Matt Damon & Lupe Fiasco as a part of the The People Speak, Live! cast. Appears on Season 2 of TVOne’s Verses & Flow. Winner of Louder Than A Bomb Youth Poetry Festival 2011 and once a member of the Youth Adult Council at Steppenwolf Theatre. He is now a member of UCAN’s National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention & Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission. A passionate educator through Young Chicago Authors & Northwestern Legal Clinic apart of Rights to Power project where he visits communities introducing poetry workshops and performances linked to juvenile & social justice to hundreds of youth every year.

Malcolm LondonNo building has a story without a foundation. If we are building a future where the sky’s the limit, one without ceilings, one where all our children are heading in the right direction–upward–we must have a strong foundation. Join panelist Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, Lila Leff,  founder of Umoja Student Development Corporation, Dr. Sofia Villenas, Associate Professor at Cornell University and myself, TED Speaker and educator through Young Chicago Authors and Northwestern Legal Clinic, as we discuss the necessary need for our culture, our true histories and our stories to be the foundations of our everyday curriculums. I encourage you to come out to the American Anthropological Association’s 112th Annual Meeting plenary session located at Hilton Hotel International Ballroom North (720 Michigan Avenue) November 20th, Wednesday evening at 6:00pm as we reimagine education.

We will be joined by four incredibly talented students I’ve been working with for the past two years from Simeon Career Academy’s poetry club, Writers Never Die, started by school counselor Patrick Kirkwood and teacher Lisa Roule, who will perform spoken word pieces at the AAA Plenary. As a Chicagoan and young organizer in this beautiful city, with beautiful buildings, I know its’ crumbling. Only half of the public school students’ graduate (that’s a failing grade) and public funding has and is taking a hard hit in this city, and nationally. While my work as an activist is to find out who is doing the punching, on this evening we will come together to inspire, challenge, invigorate and engage in fruitful dialogue as anthropologist, educators, students, parents, all loving human beings in hopes to continue to build toward the sky, while remembering and re-examining our histories, our foundations so we can reimagine our stories, and our education.

Join the This is Anthropology Team at the Annual Meeting!

Over 390 anthropologists have joined the AAA’s new public outreach website, www.thisisanthropology.org since it launched in November 2012! Thanks to all of you who already contributed photos and profiles to the website. This is Anthropology is always a work in progress and it is not too late to join. The development team for This Is Anthropology will be at the annual meeting in Chicago with even more new ways for you to participate. We hope you’ll join us at the events below:

Opening Reception

Join us at our booth during the Opening Reception in the Exhibit Hall on Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 from 6:15-7:30 PM. In addition to the food and fun of the reception, we will be on hand with This is Anthropology swag (while supplies last!) and we’ll have our cameras rolling to capture some impromptu video interviews.

This is Anthropology Booth

Even if you can’t join us at the reception, stop by our booth in the Exhibit Hall to learn more about the website and how you can be a part of This is Anthropology. It’s never too late to create a profile on the site or to share TIA in your community.

Reaching A Broader Public: The “This Is Anthropology” Project Roundtable

Join Jason Miller and Charlotte Noble on Friday, Nov. 22, 2013 from 12:15-1:30 PM in Hilton Conference Room 4M for a roundtable about the This is Anthropology project. After a brief discussion of the origin and goals of the site, we will open the floor for comments, feedback and a brainstorming of ideas for how to disseminate anthropology to a broader public.

Video Project

Finally, be on the look out for our roving camera crew during the meeting. We’re looking for anthropologists to answer one of five questions about anthropology on camera. The footage will be used to create short videos about what anthropology is, anthropological skills and careers and how to become an anthropologist.

Have further questions? Contact the TIA team at thisisanthropology@aaanet.org or participate in our conversations at #thisisanthro on Twitter!

AAA Plenary Session – ReImagining Education

Today’s guest blog post is by Malcolm London. London called the Gil-Scott Heron of this generation by Cornel West, is a young Chicago poet, activist & educator. Malcolm appears on PBS for the first TED Talk television program with John Legend & Bill Gates. Malcolm has shared stages with actor Matt Damon & Lupe Fiasco as a part of the The People Speak, Live! cast. Appears on Season 2 of TVOne’s Verses & Flow. Winner of Louder Than A Bomb Youth Poetry Festival 2011 and once a member of the Youth Adult Council at Steppenwolf Theatre. He is now a member of UCAN’s National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention & Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission. A passionate educator through Young Chicago Authors & Northwestern Legal Clinic apart of Rights to Power project where he visits communities introducing poetry workshops and performances linked to juvenile & social justice to hundreds of youth every year.

Malcolm LondonNo building has a story without a foundation. If we are building a future where the sky’s the limit, one without ceilings, one where all our children are heading in the right direction–upward–we must have a strong foundation. Join panelist Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, Lila Leff,  founder of Umoja Student Development Corporation, Dr. Sofia Villenas, Associate Professor at Cornell University and myself, TED Speaker and educator through Young Chicago Authors and Northwestern Legal Clinic, as we discuss the necessary need for our culture, our true histories and our stories to be the foundations of our everyday curriculums. I encourage you to come out to the American Anthropological Association’s 112th Annual Meeting plenary session located at Hilton Hotel International Ballroom North (720 Michigan Avenue) November 20th, Wednesday evening at 6:00pm as we reimagine education.

We will be joined by four incredibly talented students I’ve been working with for the past two years from Simeon Career Academy’s poetry club, Writers Never Die, started by school counselor Patrick Kirkwood and teacher Lisa Roule, who will perform spoken word pieces at the AAA Plenary. As a Chicagoan and young organizer in this beautiful city, with beautiful buildings, I know its’ crumbling. Only half of the public school students’ graduate (that’s a failing grade) and public funding has and is taking a hard hit in this city, and nationally. While my work as an activist is to find out who is doing the punching, on this evening we will come together to inspire, challenge, invigorate and engage in fruitful dialogue as anthropologist, educators, students, parents, all loving human beings in hopes to continue to build toward the sky, while remembering and re-examining our histories, our foundations so we can reimagine our stories, and our education.

Add Installations To Your #AAA2013 Schedule

AAA2013Installations (a remix and rebirth of “InnoVents” and “Salons” introduced to the AAA Annual Meetings program in recent years) invite anthropological knowledge off the beaten path of the written conference paper. Like work shared in art venues, presentations selected as part of the AAA Installations program will draw on movement, sight, sound, smell, and taste to dwell on the haptic and engage AAA members and meeting attendees in a diverse world of the senses. Installations are curated for off-site exhibition and tied to the official AAA conference program. They offer attendees an opportunity to learn from a range of vested interests not typically encountered or easily found on the traditional AAA program. Installations are meant to disrupt who and what we tend to see at the Annual Meetings, helping attendees encounter new people and to do different kinds of things at the intersections of anthropological arts, sciences, and cultural expression.

To register for the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting, click here. Most Installations do not require additional registration; however, there are a few that do and are indicated below.

Wednesday, November 20

2-0010 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

2-0195 ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
12:00 – 03:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

2-0660 SHADOWS THEN LIGHT: CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE FOR IMMIGRANT JUSTICE
05:30 – 07:30 Latino Cultural Center Univ of IL 803 S. Morgan St., Lecture Center B2
Abstract: We present to you an art installation birthed from struggle, hoping that it may point us to new freedoms guided by stories and vivencias of the undocumented community. Join us with the UIC Latino Cultural Center for an evening of art, poetry and storytelling for immigrant justice.

Thursday, November 21

3-0316 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

3-0925RETHINKING REPRESENTATIONS AND ACTION AT the FIELD MUSEUM
02:00 – 04:00 Field Museum
Abstract: We will use the Contemporary Urban Collections project and Restoring Earth exhibition to illustrate museum practice that aims to re-present the Chicago region, drawing people into new patterns of civic action. A dialogue will consider the effectiveness of such approaches and wider themes of constancy and change in the civic role of museums.

3-1160 AUSTERITY, INEQUALITY, AND RESISTANCE in the URBAN MIDWEST: A COMMUNITY/ACTIVIST DIALOGUE
04:00 – 06:00 Jane Addams
Abstract:In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation bring together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community activists in conversation.

3-1245 GOING PUBLIC WITH LITERARY ETHNOGRAPHY IN THE WINDY CITY: ANTHROPOLOGISTS AND CHICAGO ARTISTS BUILD NEW GENRES AND A NEW FUTURE.
08:00 – 10:00 Offsite; Columbia College So Michigan Ave Chicago IL 60605
Abstract: For decades anthropologists have been experimenting with a variety of blurred genres including ethnographic poetry and fiction, memoirs, performances, or a pastiche of multiple forms. In this special event creative anthropologists showcase new hybrid forms of ethnography and artistry in pursuit of the slippery, ever-changing concept of culture.

Friday, November 22

4-0291 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

4-0305 “WITHOUT MUSIC, THERE IS NO JOY, WITHOUT JOY, THERE IS NO MUSIC,” DJEMBE DRUMMING AND THE GLOBAL IMPACT OF MANDINGUE CULTURE
10:00 – 11:30 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This presentation consists of a demonstration of traditional Mandingue rhythms and their meanings in the context of a West African culture more than 1000 years old. The performance will be interspersed with interactive discussion exploring issues raised by the global impact of the djembe drum over the past fifty years.
Especial presentation at Hilton, Second Floor  Grand Ballroom on stage 10:00 AM-11:30AM

4-0315 THE LEGACY of Anthropology’s ENGAGEMENT WITH POLICY: A HISTORY in PICTURES AND TEXTS
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract Not Provided

4-0320 TRADE IS SUBLIME: A SCENOGRAPHIC PROPOSITION FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH AT THE WTO, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Trade is Sublime is a video installation that ponders the ontology of multilateral trade and the sustainability of the WTO as a trade regime. The installation was developed as a modality to revisit ethnographic research conducted at the WTO between 2008 and 2010, and was displayed at the WTO in Geneva in June, 2013 as a prompt for deepening those insights.
Especial presentation at  Hilton,  Second Floor  Grand Ballroom on stage 12:00PM-1:00PM

4-0325 SITES OF MEDIATION: A VISUAL ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE MARVELOUS REAL EXHIBITION (2013/4) SITIOS DE MEDIACIÓN: ARQUEOLOGÍA VISUAL DE LO REAL MARAVILLOSO (2013/4)
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Sites of Mediation is a multi-sited, bi-lingual (English/Spanish) digital photographic work. Through a visual stratigraphy of image and text, it explores four critical stages or successive, dialectical mediations in the making of an exhibition. It invites publics to extend the critical history of the exhibition by using social media to reflect on and remediate the concept, aesthetics and conceits of the archaeology.

4-0330 TOWARDS A LEGIBLE ANTHROPOLOGY: AIRING OUR DIRTY LAUNDRY
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This installation challenges anthropologists to confront the all-too-common disconnect between our work as writers and the communities we study. Passersby are invited to contribute to the clotheslines, where rags and old T-shirts air our writerly frustrations—our “dirty laundry” in the form of scribbled haikus or minimalist prose.

4-0335 HAWAI‘I BEYOND THE WAVE, HAWAI‘I BEYOND THE POSTCARD
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Visitors are invited to ‘paradise’ through the sensual impression of postcards, sounds of waves, and interview clips from my fieldwork on Kaua‘i. The act of writing postcards to other destinations of this travelling installation (Vienna, Vancouver, and Kaua‘i) creates dialogue between visitors on issues such as paradise, sustainability, and biotechnology.
Especial presentation at Hilton, Second Floor Grand Ballroom on stage 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

4-0340 ENGAGING THE FUTURE THROUGH ENGAGING THE PAST: A MULTI-MEDIA INTERPRETIVE EXPERIENCE ON THE “ROAD OF DEVELOPMENT”
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This multi-media, interactive installation invites participants to move along the development road, stopping to look at, listen to, taste and feel how a diverse group of community members, anthropologists and artists interpret particular events related to development forces: religion, education, healthcare, infrastructure, changing economies, environments, foods and more

4-0345 PRESERVATIONAL DETERMINISM; PRESERVATION of MIND
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Due to pressing issues of abandoned parcels and foreclosure in inner city neighborhoods, Cleveland, Ohio has become part of a conversation on lost space that was once sacred, and now misplaced. This installation aims to physically show the strife this property endured, and the grandeur it once held.

4-0350 DESIGNING CRITICAL CONVERSATION
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract Not Provided

4-0541 ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
12:00 – 06:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

4-1151 RECEPTION-ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
06:00 – 09:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

Saturday, November 23

5-0010 THE ANTHROPOLOGIST IN THE WHITE CITY: TOURING CHICAGO’S 1893 WORLD’S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION *Registration required*
08:00 – 09:00 Hilton, Third Floor, PDR 1
Abstract: The Anthropologist in the White City: Touring Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition offers an in-depth examination of landmarks and landscapes from the most important world’s fair in American history. Led by several experts, participants will become immersed in people, places, and things associated with the birth of American anthropology.

5-0255 ENGAGING the PUBLIC in the ANTHROPOLOGY of EDUCATION: CHICAGO AS INVOCATION AND CONTEXT *Registration required*
08:00 – 01:30 Field Museum
Abstract: This special innovent at the Field Museum considers the study and practice of education in Greater Chicago and around the world. There, educational anthropologists and local educators will address four topics: (1) migration and education; (2) schooling and the economy; (3) schools as community centers, and (4) out-of-school learning. All welcome, but advance registration required.

5-0290 MURALS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN LITTLE VILLAGE, CHICAGO
09:00 – 12:00 Offsite; La Catedral Cafe 2500 S Christiana Ave Chicago IL 60623
Abstract: This installation invites anthropologists into the heart and senses of Little Village to collaborate with well-known Environmental activists and artists in Chicago in the creation of a mural for a traveling exhibit. In the process, participants will co-imagine forms of academic/activist/student collaborations informed and shaped around haptic and sensory engagement.

5-0291 THE ANTHROPOLOGIST IN THE WHITE CITY: TOURING CHICAGO’S 1893 WORLD’S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION *Registration required*
09:00 – 01:00 Offsite
Abstract: The Anthropologist in the White City: Touring Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition offers an in-depth examination of landmarks and landscapes from the most important world’s fair in American history. Led by several experts, participants will become immersed in people, places, and things associated with the birth of American anthropology.

2-0296 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

5-0845 THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED CHICAGO WORKSHOP AND DISCUSSION: PARTICIPATORY THEATER TECHNIQUES FOR FOSTERING EMPOWERED COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO PUBLIC SCHOOL CLOSINGS
01:45 – 03:30 Hilton, Fifth Floor, Conference Room 5E
Abstract Not Provided

5-0985 THEORETICAL UTOPIAS’ ROUNTABLE: THE PROBLEM of EDUCATION in MASS SOCIETIES – WHAT IS to be DONE?
02:30 – 05:30 Offsite; University of Chicago- Contact Organizer (gbakke@wesleyan.edu) for tickets
Abstract: An informal, pie-eating, abstract-thinking, “kitchen-table” event, this year’s topic is the reform of the university system– not gathering to complain! Rather, we aim for open, creative and convivial conversation.Visions for realistic reform are just as welcome as improbable notions for totally systemic overhaul! Pie will be provided.

5-1125 TRACINGS OF TRAUMA: CREATING NEW OBSERVERS
04:00 – 05:45 Hilton, Fifth Floor, Conference Room 5E
Abstract: This is an experiment in engaged anthropology aimed at new forms of public practice. Through involving the audience, as a third voice in the translation of Iraq veterans’ narratives of war, this participatory performance challenges the notion of loss in reinterpreting experience.

Sunday, November 24

6-0276 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

6-0280 INFRASTRUCTURE AND OBSOLESCENCE IN THE URBAN U.S.
10:00 – 01:00 Offsite
Abstract: Off-site tour of infrastructure on Chicago’s mid-South Side, followed by lunch and informal discussion at New Projects space (www.new-projects.org). All sites accessible by CTA transit. Reservations kindly requested by November 1st for details and 2 short discussion texts. Participants can join after this date, but must contact Marina Peterson: petersom@ohio.edu.

Where are you going with your career?

AAA2013Meet professional anthropologists and explore career options at the NAPA/AAA Careers Expo!

NAPA/AAA Careers Expo – Exploring Professional Careers

Friday, November 22 – 11:00AM-4:00PM
Chicago Hilton, Salon C, Exhibit Hall 

Talk with professional anthropologists working in government, for-profit and non-profit organizations.   Archaeologists, medical anthropologists, cultural anthropologists.  Careers in cultural resources, health and human services, high tech, design and promotion, policy making, and more!

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest

Have you added this Installation to your personal scheduler yet? It is one not to miss.

Sponsored by the Society for North American Anthropology

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest: A
Community/Activist Dialogue

In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in
receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the
funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation
brings together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community
activists in conversation. Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday, November 21  4:00-6:00 Jane Addams Hull-House Museum The
University of Illinois at Chicago 800 S. Halsted (M/C 051) Chicago, IL
60607-7017 Organizers: Molly Doane, Ida Susser, Susan Hyatt, SANA

Contact at site:
Molly Doane mdoane@uic.edu

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

The panel includes:
Ida Susser: Introduction

Andy Newman: (Wayne State University): The Crisis in Detroit

Jane Collins (UW-Madison): The Madison uprising

Adrienne Alexander (AFSCME): Chicago perspectives

Jamie Owen Daniel (field service director for the Illinois Federation of
Teachers and Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies): Chicago perspectives

Jim Field (Chicago Coalition for the Homeless)

Christine Noschese (Filmmaker): Clips from Metropolitan Avenue

The event will take place in the Hull House dining hall, where Jane Addams
shared ideas with the leading labor organizers, activists, and
intellectuals of her day. The Hull House Museum features innovative
exhibits that connect the social concerns and activism of today to the
political issues of the early twentieth Century. “Redefining Democracy:
Jane Addams and the Hull House Settlement” and “Unfinished Business: Home
Economics in the 21st Century” will be open 10am-4PM for those interested
in visiting before the event

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