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Add Installations To Your #AAA2013 Schedule

AAA2013Installations (a remix and rebirth of “InnoVents” and “Salons” introduced to the AAA Annual Meetings program in recent years) invite anthropological knowledge off the beaten path of the written conference paper. Like work shared in art venues, presentations selected as part of the AAA Installations program will draw on movement, sight, sound, smell, and taste to dwell on the haptic and engage AAA members and meeting attendees in a diverse world of the senses. Installations are curated for off-site exhibition and tied to the official AAA conference program. They offer attendees an opportunity to learn from a range of vested interests not typically encountered or easily found on the traditional AAA program. Installations are meant to disrupt who and what we tend to see at the Annual Meetings, helping attendees encounter new people and to do different kinds of things at the intersections of anthropological arts, sciences, and cultural expression.

To register for the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting, click here. Most Installations do not require additional registration; however, there are a few that do and are indicated below.

Wednesday, November 20

2-0010 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

2-0195 ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
12:00 – 03:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

2-0660 SHADOWS THEN LIGHT: CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE FOR IMMIGRANT JUSTICE
05:30 – 07:30 Latino Cultural Center Univ of IL 803 S. Morgan St., Lecture Center B2
Abstract: We present to you an art installation birthed from struggle, hoping that it may point us to new freedoms guided by stories and vivencias of the undocumented community. Join us with the UIC Latino Cultural Center for an evening of art, poetry and storytelling for immigrant justice.

Thursday, November 21

3-0316 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

3-0925RETHINKING REPRESENTATIONS AND ACTION AT the FIELD MUSEUM
02:00 – 04:00 Field Museum
Abstract: We will use the Contemporary Urban Collections project and Restoring Earth exhibition to illustrate museum practice that aims to re-present the Chicago region, drawing people into new patterns of civic action. A dialogue will consider the effectiveness of such approaches and wider themes of constancy and change in the civic role of museums.

3-1160 AUSTERITY, INEQUALITY, AND RESISTANCE in the URBAN MIDWEST: A COMMUNITY/ACTIVIST DIALOGUE
04:00 – 06:00 Jane Addams
Abstract:In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation bring together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community activists in conversation.

3-1245 GOING PUBLIC WITH LITERARY ETHNOGRAPHY IN THE WINDY CITY: ANTHROPOLOGISTS AND CHICAGO ARTISTS BUILD NEW GENRES AND A NEW FUTURE.
08:00 – 10:00 Offsite; Columbia College So Michigan Ave Chicago IL 60605
Abstract: For decades anthropologists have been experimenting with a variety of blurred genres including ethnographic poetry and fiction, memoirs, performances, or a pastiche of multiple forms. In this special event creative anthropologists showcase new hybrid forms of ethnography and artistry in pursuit of the slippery, ever-changing concept of culture.

Friday, November 22

4-0291 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

4-0305 “WITHOUT MUSIC, THERE IS NO JOY, WITHOUT JOY, THERE IS NO MUSIC,” DJEMBE DRUMMING AND THE GLOBAL IMPACT OF MANDINGUE CULTURE
10:00 – 11:30 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This presentation consists of a demonstration of traditional Mandingue rhythms and their meanings in the context of a West African culture more than 1000 years old. The performance will be interspersed with interactive discussion exploring issues raised by the global impact of the djembe drum over the past fifty years.
Especial presentation at Hilton, Second Floor  Grand Ballroom on stage 10:00 AM-11:30AM

4-0315 THE LEGACY of Anthropology’s ENGAGEMENT WITH POLICY: A HISTORY in PICTURES AND TEXTS
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract Not Provided

4-0320 TRADE IS SUBLIME: A SCENOGRAPHIC PROPOSITION FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH AT THE WTO, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Trade is Sublime is a video installation that ponders the ontology of multilateral trade and the sustainability of the WTO as a trade regime. The installation was developed as a modality to revisit ethnographic research conducted at the WTO between 2008 and 2010, and was displayed at the WTO in Geneva in June, 2013 as a prompt for deepening those insights.
Especial presentation at  Hilton,  Second Floor  Grand Ballroom on stage 12:00PM-1:00PM

4-0325 SITES OF MEDIATION: A VISUAL ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE MARVELOUS REAL EXHIBITION (2013/4) SITIOS DE MEDIACIÓN: ARQUEOLOGÍA VISUAL DE LO REAL MARAVILLOSO (2013/4)
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Sites of Mediation is a multi-sited, bi-lingual (English/Spanish) digital photographic work. Through a visual stratigraphy of image and text, it explores four critical stages or successive, dialectical mediations in the making of an exhibition. It invites publics to extend the critical history of the exhibition by using social media to reflect on and remediate the concept, aesthetics and conceits of the archaeology.

4-0330 TOWARDS A LEGIBLE ANTHROPOLOGY: AIRING OUR DIRTY LAUNDRY
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This installation challenges anthropologists to confront the all-too-common disconnect between our work as writers and the communities we study. Passersby are invited to contribute to the clotheslines, where rags and old T-shirts air our writerly frustrations—our “dirty laundry” in the form of scribbled haikus or minimalist prose.

4-0335 HAWAI‘I BEYOND THE WAVE, HAWAI‘I BEYOND THE POSTCARD
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Visitors are invited to ‘paradise’ through the sensual impression of postcards, sounds of waves, and interview clips from my fieldwork on Kaua‘i. The act of writing postcards to other destinations of this travelling installation (Vienna, Vancouver, and Kaua‘i) creates dialogue between visitors on issues such as paradise, sustainability, and biotechnology.
Especial presentation at Hilton, Second Floor Grand Ballroom on stage 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

4-0340 ENGAGING THE FUTURE THROUGH ENGAGING THE PAST: A MULTI-MEDIA INTERPRETIVE EXPERIENCE ON THE “ROAD OF DEVELOPMENT”
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: This multi-media, interactive installation invites participants to move along the development road, stopping to look at, listen to, taste and feel how a diverse group of community members, anthropologists and artists interpret particular events related to development forces: religion, education, healthcare, infrastructure, changing economies, environments, foods and more

4-0345 PRESERVATIONAL DETERMINISM; PRESERVATION of MIND
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract: Due to pressing issues of abandoned parcels and foreclosure in inner city neighborhoods, Cleveland, Ohio has become part of a conversation on lost space that was once sacred, and now misplaced. This installation aims to physically show the strife this property endured, and the grandeur it once held.

4-0350 DESIGNING CRITICAL CONVERSATION
10:00 – 03:00 Hilton, Second Floor, Grand Ballroom
Abstract Not Provided

4-0541 ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
12:00 – 06:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

4-1151 RECEPTION-ETHNOGRAPHIC TERMINALIA 2013: CHICAGO “EXHIBITION AS RESIDENCY—PROCESS, COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY”
06:00 – 09:00 Offsite; Washington Park Arts Incubator. University of Chicago 301 E Garfield Blvd Chicago IL 60637
Abstract: Ethnographic Terminalia is a curatorial collective that exhibits new forms of anthropology engaged with contemporary art practice. Playfully exploring reflexivity and positionally, we ask what lies within and what lies beyond disciplinary territories. This year, “Exhibition as Residency–Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” brings together internationally-based artists and anthropologists for a five-day residency in which to perform, exhibit, and experiment with collaborative research practices in a public space.

Saturday, November 23

5-0010 THE ANTHROPOLOGIST IN THE WHITE CITY: TOURING CHICAGO’S 1893 WORLD’S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION *Registration required*
08:00 – 09:00 Hilton, Third Floor, PDR 1
Abstract: The Anthropologist in the White City: Touring Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition offers an in-depth examination of landmarks and landscapes from the most important world’s fair in American history. Led by several experts, participants will become immersed in people, places, and things associated with the birth of American anthropology.

5-0255 ENGAGING the PUBLIC in the ANTHROPOLOGY of EDUCATION: CHICAGO AS INVOCATION AND CONTEXT *Registration required*
08:00 – 01:30 Field Museum
Abstract: This special innovent at the Field Museum considers the study and practice of education in Greater Chicago and around the world. There, educational anthropologists and local educators will address four topics: (1) migration and education; (2) schooling and the economy; (3) schools as community centers, and (4) out-of-school learning. All welcome, but advance registration required.

5-0290 MURALS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN LITTLE VILLAGE, CHICAGO
09:00 – 12:00 Offsite; La Catedral Cafe 2500 S Christiana Ave Chicago IL 60623
Abstract: This installation invites anthropologists into the heart and senses of Little Village to collaborate with well-known Environmental activists and artists in Chicago in the creation of a mural for a traveling exhibit. In the process, participants will co-imagine forms of academic/activist/student collaborations informed and shaped around haptic and sensory engagement.

5-0291 THE ANTHROPOLOGIST IN THE WHITE CITY: TOURING CHICAGO’S 1893 WORLD’S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION *Registration required*
09:00 – 01:00 Offsite
Abstract: The Anthropologist in the White City: Touring Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition offers an in-depth examination of landmarks and landscapes from the most important world’s fair in American history. Led by several experts, participants will become immersed in people, places, and things associated with the birth of American anthropology.

2-0296 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

5-0845 THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED CHICAGO WORKSHOP AND DISCUSSION: PARTICIPATORY THEATER TECHNIQUES FOR FOSTERING EMPOWERED COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO PUBLIC SCHOOL CLOSINGS
01:45 – 03:30 Hilton, Fifth Floor, Conference Room 5E
Abstract Not Provided

5-0985 THEORETICAL UTOPIAS’ ROUNTABLE: THE PROBLEM of EDUCATION in MASS SOCIETIES – WHAT IS to be DONE?
02:30 – 05:30 Offsite; University of Chicago- Contact Organizer (gbakke@wesleyan.edu) for tickets
Abstract: An informal, pie-eating, abstract-thinking, “kitchen-table” event, this year’s topic is the reform of the university system– not gathering to complain! Rather, we aim for open, creative and convivial conversation.Visions for realistic reform are just as welcome as improbable notions for totally systemic overhaul! Pie will be provided.

5-1125 TRACINGS OF TRAUMA: CREATING NEW OBSERVERS
04:00 – 05:45 Hilton, Fifth Floor, Conference Room 5E
Abstract: This is an experiment in engaged anthropology aimed at new forms of public practice. Through involving the audience, as a third voice in the translation of Iraq veterans’ narratives of war, this participatory performance challenges the notion of loss in reinterpreting experience.

Sunday, November 24

6-0276 FRAGMENTS: GLIMPSES OF HAITIAN LIFE THREE YEARS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
09:00 – 05:00 Field Museum
Abstract: Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake,” curated by Mark Schuller for the Anthropology Museum at Northern Illinois University, is on display at The Field Museum exclusively for the AAA Annual Meetings. It explores the life histories and living conditions of the 279,000 Haitian people still living “under the tents” four years after Haiti’s earthquake.

6-0280 INFRASTRUCTURE AND OBSOLESCENCE IN THE URBAN U.S.
10:00 – 01:00 Offsite
Abstract: Off-site tour of infrastructure on Chicago’s mid-South Side, followed by lunch and informal discussion at New Projects space (www.new-projects.org). All sites accessible by CTA transit. Reservations kindly requested by November 1st for details and 2 short discussion texts. Participants can join after this date, but must contact Marina Peterson: petersom@ohio.edu.

Where are you going with your career?

AAA2013Meet professional anthropologists and explore career options at the NAPA/AAA Careers Expo!

NAPA/AAA Careers Expo – Exploring Professional Careers

Friday, November 22 – 11:00AM-4:00PM
Chicago Hilton, Salon C, Exhibit Hall 

Talk with professional anthropologists working in government, for-profit and non-profit organizations.   Archaeologists, medical anthropologists, cultural anthropologists.  Careers in cultural resources, health and human services, high tech, design and promotion, policy making, and more!

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest

Have you added this Installation to your personal scheduler yet? It is one not to miss.

Sponsored by the Society for North American Anthropology

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

Austerity, Inequality, and Resistance in the Urban Midwest: A
Community/Activist Dialogue

In light of the recent placement of Detroit and other Michigan cities in
receivership as well as the battles over public service unions and the
funding of public services in Wisconsin and Illinois, this installation
brings together critical anthropologists, filmmakers and community
activists in conversation. Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday, November 21  4:00-6:00 Jane Addams Hull-House Museum The
University of Illinois at Chicago 800 S. Halsted (M/C 051) Chicago, IL
60607-7017 Organizers: Molly Doane, Ida Susser, Susan Hyatt, SANA

Contact at site:
Molly Doane mdoane@uic.edu

Photo courtesy of Molly Duane

Photo courtesy of Molly Doane

The panel includes:
Ida Susser: Introduction

Andy Newman: (Wayne State University): The Crisis in Detroit

Jane Collins (UW-Madison): The Madison uprising

Adrienne Alexander (AFSCME): Chicago perspectives

Jamie Owen Daniel (field service director for the Illinois Federation of
Teachers and Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies): Chicago perspectives

Jim Field (Chicago Coalition for the Homeless)

Christine Noschese (Filmmaker): Clips from Metropolitan Avenue

The event will take place in the Hull House dining hall, where Jane Addams
shared ideas with the leading labor organizers, activists, and
intellectuals of her day. The Hull House Museum features innovative
exhibits that connect the social concerns and activism of today to the
political issues of the early twentieth Century. “Redefining Democracy:
Jane Addams and the Hull House Settlement” and “Unfinished Business: Home
Economics in the 21st Century” will be open 10am-4PM for those interested
in visiting before the event

Susan Hyatt: An Anthropologist Back to School

Today’s guest blog post is written by Dr. Susan B. Hyatt.  Dr. Hyatt is currently an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). During the 1980s, she spent 8 years working as a community organizer in South Chicago, which is where she first developed her interest in  community collaborative projects. Dr. Hyatt has volunteered to lead a program in the Anthropologists Back to School initiative. Her program will take place at The Field Museum. This new initiative seeks volunteers to lead and assist programs at various host sites throughout Chicago on Wednesday, November 20 from 9am to12pm. Share your passion of anthropology while giving back to this year’s host city – Chicago. Learn more about how you can participate in Anthropologists Back to School and register today!

Photo courtesy IUPUI

Photo courtesy IUPUI

I am looking forward to participating in the Anthropologists Back to School initiative at the Field Museum in Chicago on November 19th.  My workshop will be based on a collaborative ethnographic project I carried out in Indianapolis, which brought together university students, a synagogue, a community center and a Black Baptist Church in an endeavor we called, “The Neighborhood of Saturdays.”

In 2010, Anthropology students from my institution, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) began conducting oral history interviews with former residents of what had once been one of the most multi-ethnic neighborhoods in Indianapolis—the near Southside.  We focused on two groups who had occupied that space between 1920-1960— the children of Jewish immigrants whose families hailed from cities formerly located in the Ottoman Empire in the early years of the 20th century, and African Americans whose families arrived from the south during the Great Migration.  During the 1950s, many of the Jewish families began moving to the more affluent northside neighborhoods where many of the Jewish communal institutions had already relocated.  Ten years later, the remaining African American community was displaced by the construction of an interstate highway that bisected the old neighborhood, destroying both residential properties and a once-vibrant commercial strip.

Photos courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Photos courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Former African-American and Jewish neighbors largely lost contact with one another after the highway came through.  Once a year, however, the African-American former southsiders continued to gather in a small park in the old neighborhood for a reunion picnic, held on the first Saturday in August.  I learned about the reunion picnics and began attending them in 2008 with the idea that students enrolled in my Ethnographic Methods class would collect life histories about the old Southside and about the reunions, which were then in their 35th year. I had assumed that the neighborhood had long been primarily African-American, however in my interviews at that first picnic, several folks shared with me their recollections of how special they felt it had been to grow up in a multi-ethnic neighborhood, especially in that earlier historical era, and they reminisced in particular about their former Jewish neighbors and about the many Jewish-owned businesses that had once thronged the main thoroughfare, Meridian St.

Through a chance encounter, I met later met a member of one of those Southside Jewish families and she put me in touch with others.  Both communities were excited and enthusiastic about coming back together to work with the students toward the goal of writing a book about their community.  We changed the name of the project from “First Saturday in August” to “The Neighborhood of Saturdays,” which incorporated references to both the picnic and to the Jewish observance of the Sabbath on Saturdays.

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Over a two-year period, Jewish and African-American Southsiders gathered regularly with the students to record their life stories and to talk about the on-going research and plan the book.  In addition to carrying out the oral history interviews, students also engaged in archival research about the neighborhood and they organized several events we called “scan-a-thons.”  The scan-a-thons were held at a community center, at the synagogue and at the Black church, where we invited people to bring old photographs, church bulletins, newspaper articles and other memorabilia about the neighborhood which we scanned using laptops and portable scanners.  All of that material was organized and catalogued by our university library’s Digital Scholarship team and it is now available on a library web site, along with some of the publicity that the project garnered, including an article from the New York Times and a recent story on our local NPR affiliate.

Last February, we self-published the book, The Neighborhood of Saturdays: Memories of a Multi-Ethnic Neighborhood on Indianapolis’ Southside.  Elders who were involved in the project have continued to organize events around the city to share their memories of growing up together and to reflect on their experiences reuniting after more than 50 years to work on the book.

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

Photo courtesy of Angela Herrmann

The students and I were surprised to learn that during an era when Jim Crow was a de facto aspect of life in Indianapolis, in the “neighborhood of Saturdays,” people had once come together across racial and religious boundaries to forge friendships that were revived by our research project. For my Back to School workshop, I plan to share some stories about this project and to perhaps show the students some short videos of our elders talking about the old neighborhood.  I hope to help them think about how urban neighborhoods change through time, and to understand how we can use strategies like mapping, interviewing and scanning old photographs to discover stories that might surprise us today. Like Sabiyha Prince, I also hope that some of them will think about working on their own neighborhood history projects, and about perhaps organizing their own story-telling sessions and even scan-a-thons with their family elders and neighbors.   If nothing else, hopefully they will learn that the communities where they live now and that they take for granted in their current incarnations may once have looked very different, and that they can use some of the strategies we used to uncover their own neighborhood’s “hidden history.”

Going to Chicago? Hotel Room Discounts end tomorrow – Book Now!

CC_Aerial_Trump_DuSableHarbor_Small

The deadline to book your hotel at a discounted rate is this Wednesday, October 23rd.  The 112th Annual Meeting in Chicago will be held November 20-24, 2013. Scholarly sessions and special events will take place at the Chicago Hilton, Renaissance Blackstone and Essex Inn. Two more hotels have been recently added to help accommodate attendees.  Hurry to book your room today!

Going to Chicago? Hotel Room Discounts end 10/23 – Book Now!

CC_Aerial_Trump_DuSableHarbor_Small

The deadline to book your hotel at a discounted rate is this Wednesday, October 23rd.  The 112th Annual Meeting in Chicago will be held November 20-24, 2013. Scholarly sessions and special events will take place at the Chicago Hilton, Renaissance Blackstone and Essex Inn. Two more hotels have been recently added to help accommodate attendees.  Hurry to book your room today!

Now is the time to register for workshops!

Today’s guest blog post is by Dr. Sabrina Nichelle Scott.  Dr. Scott is a consumer anthropologist, and she is the Chair of the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology (NAPA) Workshops Committee.

Workshops registration is now available for the AAA Annual Meeting in Chicago.  There are forty-three workshops sponsored by various sections of AAA with fifteen of those workshops offered by NAPA.  Workshops are scheduled from Thursday, November 21, 2013 through Saturday, November 23, 2013.

Workshop 9842: NAPA Workshop On the Design Process: Design Thinking, Tools, and Methods
Time/Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013: 8:00 AM-10:00 AM
Workshops Abstract: What is ‘design thinking’ and why is it important to anthropologists? Like anthropologists, designers conduct research, collecting, analyzing, and synthesizing data. However, the process, methods, and tools used by designers are unique in many ways. The design process is characterized by the intense use of visualization (i.e., mind-mapping, story boarding, diagramming, white boarding, journey-mapping, and conceptual models) and tools ranging from post-its and sharpies to graphic software programs like the Adobe Creative Suite. The design process is nonlinear and iterative, with designers often engaging in multiple rounds of research, sharing initial insights with ‘users’ (study participants) and validating solutions through prototype testing. Learning how designers approach research projects can provide fresh insights for anthropologists as well as new tools and methods for data collection, analysis, and synthesis. This workshop will introduce the design process and the RASP model (research, analysis, synthesis, prototyping) used by many designers. We will discuss how to apply design thinking and demonstrate tools and methods that focus on how data can be used to inform and frame concept space, to generate options and solutions, and to design prototypes.
Organizer:  Christine Z Miller (Savannah College of Art and Design)

Workshop 9741: NAPA Workshop On What’s Your PITCH? Who’s In Your Network?
Time/Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013: 10:15 AM-12:15 PM
Workshops Abstract: In this interactive workshop, “What’s Your Pitch? Who’s in Your Network?” you will learn strategies for engaging people and launching yourself professionally. First, the workshop covers the what, who, when, where, and how of networking. It will help you increase the size of your existing professional network and suggest ways of keeping track of those with whom you interact. Second, the focus of the workshop is designed to help you make a compelling case for why a firm, non-profit, government agency, non-governmental organization, or university department should place their bets on you – whether as an employee, contractor, consultant, or student intern. You will create and practice your “elevator pitch,” a brief summary that if done well captures people’s imagination and offers them a window into your potential. You will also develop talking points for a longer narrative that can be used when time is less of an issue. The workshop presenters will provide advice and coaching to help you capitalize on network ties and communicate successfully with your expanding network. This workshop would be useful for students, practitioners, academically-based individuals, and those in career transition.
Organizer:  Sabrina Nichelle Scott (Lillian Rosebud)

Workshop 9649: NAPA-NASA Workshop:  Applying to Graduate School, Faculty and Student Perspectives
Time/Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013: 12:30 PM-2:30 PM
Workshops Abstract: This workshop addresses the process of application to graduate programs in anthropology. While the main emphasis will be on the preparation of the application package, other topics to be discussed include selecting the right program, visiting departments, following up with programs, and making an informed decision, among others
Organizers:  Nancy Y Romero-Daza (University of South Florida)
Presenters:  Alexander J Orona (Cambridge University) and Kelli Hayes (University of South Florida)

Workshop 9849: NAPA Workshop On Marketing Oneself As An Anthropologist in a Variety of Interdisciplinary Settings
Time/Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013: 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
Workshops Abstract: This workshop addresses career opportunities in interdisciplinary settings such as government, community-based, corporate, and non anthropology academic departments. Based on the presenter’s work experience and non-traditional career trajectory, she will cover how to interview for these positions and ultimately be successful in them. This interactive workshop is two hours long. In this workshop, the presenter will address how to research these opportunities as well as how to interview effectively once they find them. The presenter will then provide participants with strategies for carving one’s niche in the position. Lastly, the presenter will discuss how to maintain an active role in the world of anthropology while also working to establish one’s identity in another disciplinary realm.
Organizer:  Amy Raquel Paul-Ward (Florida International University)

Workshop 9051: NAPA Workshop On Making a Publishable Field-Site Map
Time/Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013: 2:45 PM-4:45 PM
Workshops Abstract: Regardless of one’s subject of research, anthropological data are gathered in specific geographic places. When the time comes to publish a manuscript or monograph, or even give a presentation, most anthropologists are without the skills necessary to produce a publishable map, and resort to finding either a more general map from the internet, or requesting permission to use another scholar’s map. This two-hour workshop will introduce anthropologists to 1) the basic design principles of map-making; 2) the data sources needed and how to acquire them; and 3) basic software usage. Following this overview, participants will work through a module to become familiar with the software and design process. Participants will then use these basic skills and the data they bring to the workshop to begin producing a map of their field-site. Participants will need to bring their own laptop computers, and download both freely available software and data sets prior to the workshop. Download instructions and suggestions for obtaining data will be provided ahead of the workshop to registered participants. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to use these introductory skills and software knowledge to gather additional data to enrich their field-site maps, and understand the principles and techniques necessary to produce a publishable field-site map.
Organizer:  David D Meek (University of Georgia)

Workshop 9751: NAPA Workshop On Making A Difference: Planning for Your Anthropological Engagement At Various Career Stages
Time/Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013: 3:30 PM-5:30 PM
Workshops Abstract: This workshop helps students, mid-career, retiring anthropologists and others consider turning points and transitions in their careers. A planning process will help you articulate a strategy for anthropologically addressing issues that you feel passionate about. We will discuss how you can use your anthropological background and skill-set to form an action plan to bring about social change on issues that are important to you. The workshop leader, an author of an anthropological career development book, will frame these topics for you and guide you in starting the planning process. Next you will do some individual planning and writing. You will begin to assess why you have chosen specific issues, the role working on these issues currently has in your life and to what extent you are satisfied with your engagement. Then you can consider how you would potentially like that level of commitment to change over time, what next steps are, and how you will use your anthropological training and experience in future involvement. We will share these reflections and responses together. You will also receive feedback about how to go forward in further planning for your anthropological engagement and achieving your goals. The workshop is two hours long.
Organizer:  Sherylyn H Briller (Wayne State University)

Workshop 9415: NAPA Workshop On Effective Negotiating for Anthropologists
Time/Date: Friday, November 22, 2013: 8:00 AM-10:00 AM
Workshops Abstract: In all academic negotiations the goal is to gain the best possible compensation package while remaining within an appropriate range of requests and preserving excellent relations with the hiring department and future colleagues. Because even small increases in a job compensation package can yield enormous returns over the course of an individual’s career, negotiating is an invaluable skill to master for any anthropologist on or off the tenure track. Yet negotiating is one of the least understood elements of the job search, and academics are often uncomfortable with the practice, in some cases hesitating to appear grasping in the face of a coveted offer, and in other cases having no idea of the nature and scope of things that may be requested. In this workshop I explain the norms of negotiating the academic job offer. First, I discuss the basic elements of the tenure track offer, including salary, teaching release time, start-up funds, research funding, conference travel funding, spousal hires, summer salary, etc. I explain how to evaluate an offer, the general norms of academic job offers, and the scope for negotiation of offers at different ranks of institutions, for different types of positions. Second, I discuss written and verbal techniques of negotiation and the common pitfalls that beset the inexperienced negotiator. I pay special attention to self-sabotaging habits common to women in particular, and use role play to demonstrate best practices.
Organizer:  Karen Kelsky (The Professor Is In)

Workshop 9589: NAPA/NASA Workshop On Undergraduate and Graduate Funding
Time/Date: Friday, November 22, 2013: 10:15 AM-12:15 PM
Workshops Abstract: Information on funding for undergraduate and graduate students will be presented. Public and private sources of funding will be discussed along with opportunities for field-based research and field schools. Non-traditional fundraising, crowd funding, and non-academic funding will also be examined. Tips and best practices for successful proposals will be offered.
Organizer:  David A Himmelgreen (University of South Florida)

Workshop 8841: NAPA Workshop On Mixed Method Evaluations: Qualitative Or Quantitative Or What?
Time/Date: Friday, November 22, 2013: 12:30 PM-2:30 PM
Workshops Abstract: Anthropologists often join evaluations as “qualitative” members of teams in mixed method projects. This workshop will address the technical challenges of participating in interdisciplinary projects that merge qualitative and quantitative methods in mixed method evaluations. But what is the role of the anthropologist on such projects? Ethnographer? Text analyst? “Human factors” expert? Referee? And what do we need to know about quantitative methods to do this work? We will explore the theoretical and methodological concerns that affect the design of mixed-method evaluations, the negotiations that are needed to blend methods to focus on the same issues, and analysis methods that articulate different species of data into a single body of evidence. The workshop will be participatory and will include group work to design a mixed-method project.
Organizer:  Mary Odell Butler (Reston)

Workshop 9890: NAPA Workshop On (FREE) Software For Writing and Managing Fieldnotes: Flex DATA Notebook For PCs
Time/Date: Friday, November 22, 2013: 2:45 PM-4:45 PM
Workshops Abstract: The FLEx Data Notebook is designed for writing and managing fieldnotes. This workshop is an interactive demonstration of basic features for this free software. The Data Notebook comes with standardized and customizable templates for data input and several ways to search, retrieve, and review data. Multi-language and script technologies allow its use in almost any linguistic environment in the world. In its latest release, the Data Notebook has been embedded in SIL’s FieldWorks Language Explorer – FLEx (Ver 7.2.7). Best of all, FLEx is free! Downloaded are available from the SIL server at: http://fieldworks.sil.org/download/fw-727. System requirements: FLEx is designed for the Windows operating system. A Linux-compatible release is available. A Mac version is not available, but the program is functional on Macs with a Windows partition.
Organizers:  James Tim M Wallace (NC State University) and G Tomas Woodward (SIL International)

Workshop 9698: NAPA Workshop On Heritage Tourism: Theory and Praxis
Time/Date: Saturday, November 23, 2013: 8:00 AM-10:00 AM
Workshops Abstract: This workshop is for graduate students and faculty working on issues of tourism and/or heritage. Participants maybe either initiating research or doing post-fieldwork analysis. The workshop provides a critical understanding of the history of heritage tourism, theoretical framings, and methodological approaches. There is a workshop course “book” with bibliographies, syllabus, handouts, and interactive exercises. Participants have the opportunity to discuss their own projects and raise questions about the application of ideas and strategies developed in the workshop. The goal is for participants to be able to take these tools and apply them directly to their own ongoing research by developing new kinds of research questions and modes of study that correspond to the assessment of this interdisciplinary field presented in this workshop.
Organizers:  Quetzil E Castaneda (OSEA Open School Ethn Anth) and James Tim M Wallace (NC State University)

Workshop 9552: NAPA Workshop On Stress Management and Building Self-Esteem for Students and Beginning Professionals
Time/Date: Saturday, November 23, 2013: 10:15 AM-12:15 PM
Workshops Abstract: This workshop will help students and beginning professionals learn how to develop and practice stress management and self-esteem-building skills, which are essential for career development whether one is an academic or practicing anthropologist. The presenter will set the stage by sharing real-life examples that underscore the importance of self-knowledge and maintaining balance in one’s personal and professional lives. The balance of the workshop will involve small-group work and collective sharing of insights. Dr. Teresita Majewski, RPA, FSA, vice president and chief operating officer of Statistical Research, Inc., will lead the workshop. Her experience has spanned more than 25 years in academic and practicing settings, and she has balanced her anthropological career with civic and professional service and a full personal life, often by employing creative and sometimes unconventional (by anthropological standards) strategies. But even the paths of the most-successful professionals are not smooth. The goal of the workshop is to introduce participants to the tools necessary to make the transition from “unsure/”insecure” undergraduate/graduate student to “confident professional,” while weathering the inevitable challenges and setbacks by understanding and managing external and internal stresses.
Organizer:  Teresita Majewski (Statistical Research, Inc.)

Workshop 9313: NAPA Workshop On Preparing Undergraduates To Practice Anthropology
Time/Date: Saturday, November 23, 2013: 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
Workshops Abstract: Preparing undergraduates to use anthropology after graduation requires pedagogy aimed at building the skills most sought after by employers, and helping students to communicate their skills effectively. This workshop will connect desired outcomes for students to classroom exercises and techniques. Attention will be given to ways of intentionally building skills from introductory courses to senior seminars. These techniques can be used in courses on applied anthropology, but can also be integrated into anthropology courses without an applied focus. The workshop will be designed with input from current practicing anthropologists from both the academy and outside, and advice from employers of anthropology undergraduates.
Organizer:  Anne Goldberg (Hendrix College)

Workshop 8697: NAPA Workshop On Data Sanitization:  Rituals and Responsibilities
Time/Date: Saturday, November 23, 2013: 2:45 PM-4:45 PM
Workshops Abstract: This one-day workshop will provide an introduction to Data Sanitization – the process of cleaning confidential information from various types of data sets and digital files. Using basic procedures accessible to computer users at all levels of skill, the course will introduce participants to: (1) the risks that unsanitized data can cause to informants and research subjects; (2) the types of private information that can be gleaned from unsanitized data files; (3) basic methods for stripping metadata from digital files; (4) basic methods for masking and substituting sensitive spreadsheet data in Excel; (5) and general best-practices for data security.
Organizer:  Isaac J Morrison (Sentimentec)

Workshop 9952: NAPA Workshop On Program Logic Models: A Tool For Evaluators and Project Planners
Time/Date: Saturday, November 23, 2013: 3:30 PM-5:30 PM
Workshops Abstract: Program logic models are a frequently used tool in evaluation, and are often required by funders in submitted grant proposals. This workshop is for practicing anthropologists who are new to this tool or somewhat familiar with it, and will include alternate formats for logic models and use with community groups. Appropriate forms of logic models can be used for framing discussions as part of ongoing participatory process evaluation, as part of an “empowerment evaluation” approach, as well as specifying targeted outcomes and supporting more realistic estimates of when these can be expected. The relationship of logic models to program theory and theory of change approaches to evaluation will be discussed. Participants who may be involved with projects where logic models are being developed are encouraged to come with questions to share or materials for feedback. Handouts and references will be provided. This workshop is sponsored by the Evaluation Anthropology Interest Group of the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology.
Organizer:  Eve C Pinsker (University of Illinois at Chicago)

You can register on-site, but guarantee your seat in advance by registering online.  I look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

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