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Changes to the AAA Publishing Program

Have you heard about the upcoming changes to the AAA Publishing Program? Below is an excerpt from newest issue of Anthropology News, featuring a piece by AAA Director of Publishing, Oona Schmid.

In November 2013, the AAA Executive Board (EB) adopted a series of recommendations from the Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing (CFPEP) that embrace new ways of producing and distributing its journals and endeavor to get the association’s publishing program on sustainable footing. These changes also ensure the association will have resources for new innovation (see “Mind the App Gap”). Specifically, the EB moved that member print copies (for all the titles covered in the Wiley-Blackwell service level agreement) will become fully digital starting in 2016. Individual members will be able to buy at cost a print subscription to any journal published by sections that member has joined. The EB authorized creation of a publishing oversight working group within CFPEP, a working group that will have three section representatives. And finally, the EB required that sections who would like to be included in any 2016 Request for Proposals to publishers would need to submit five-year plans (covering 2016–20), which will be reviewed by a Publishing Oversight Working Group of CFPEP. Even though the publishing contract does not expire until the end of 2017, we need to plan to either renew or locate a new partner in 2016.

Much like fieldwork, the publishing world is a work in progress. These changes do not represent a break with the past, rather, they show the ongoing advancement of the publishing program, a necessary progression that will improve the accessibility and visibility of our journals in response to changes in the publishing environment faced by newspapers, university presses, and other scholarly societies.

The evolution of the AAA publishing program can be divided schematically into three stages.pub model

Read the entire article in Anthropology News. Have questions? Check up the recently updated Publishing FAQs.

Last day to vote for your favorite photo

Voting in the 2013 AAA Photo Contest is now open to current AAA members through today, September 30, 2013.The voting system displays thumbnails of each photo. To review galleries with larger images of the entries, please visit the Knowledge Exchange section of Anthropology News.

You may also link directly to galleries of each of the categories:

Voters will be able to select 9 out of 39 photos in the People category, 6 out of 24 photos in the Place category, and 5 out of 19 photos in the Process and Practice category. Winning photos will be displayed at the annual meeting in Chicago and will also appear in Anthropology News.

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to encourage members to share their field experiences and demonstrate the breadth of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists are pursuing today, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.

Ready to vote? Click here .

Questions?If you have any questions or comments, email Amy Goldenberg at photos@aaanet.org.

Vote for your Favorite Photo

Voting in the 2013 AAA Photo Contest is now open to current AAA members through September 30, 2013.The voting system displays thumbnails of each photo. To review galleries with larger images of the entries, please visit the Knowledge Exchange section of Anthropology News.

You may also link directly to galleries of each of the categories:

Voters will be able to select 9 out of 39 photos in the People category, 6 out of 24 photos in the Place category, and 5 out of 19 photos in the Process and Practice category. Winning photos will be displayed at the annual meeting in Chicago and will also appear in Anthropology News.

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to encourage members to share their field experiences and demonstrate the breadth of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists are pursuing today, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.

Ready to vote? Click here .

Questions?If you have any questions or comments, email Amy Goldenberg at photos@aaanet.org.

Vote for your Favorite Photo

Voting in the 2013 AAA Photo Contest is now open to current AAA members through September 30, 2013.The voting system displays thumbnails of each photo. To review galleries with larger images of the entries, please visit the Knowledge Exchange section of Anthropology News.

You may also link directly to galleries of each of the categories:

Voters will be able to select 9 out of 39 photos in the People category, 6 out of 24 photos in the Place category, and 5 out of 19 photos in the Process and Practice category. Winning photos will be displayed at the annual meeting in Chicago and will also appear in Anthropology News.

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to encourage members to share their field experiences and demonstrate the breadth of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists are pursuing today, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.

Ready to vote? Click here .

Questions?If you have any questions or comments, email Amy Goldenberg at photos@aaanet.org.

Calling All Shutterbugs – The 2013 AAA Photo Contest

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to demonstrate the rich possibilities of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists pursue, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.  Visit the AAA Photo Contest page for guidelines and submission details.

Curious about past selected photos? Check out the 201220112009 and 2008 photo contest results.

Photo by Andrea Heckman 2012 AAA Photo Contest Winner

Photo by Andrea Heckman
2012 AAA Photo Contest Winner

Calling All Shutterbugs – The 2013 AAA Photo Contest

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to demonstrate the rich possibilities of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists pursue, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.  Visit the AAA Photo Contest page for guidelines and submission details.

Curious about past selected photos? Check out the 201220112009 and 2008 photo contest results.

Photo by Ann Gold

Photo by Ann Gold
2012 AAA Photo Contest Winner

Calling All Shutterbugs – The 2013 AAA Photo Contest

The AAA Photo Contest is designed to demonstrate the rich possibilities of anthropological work through photography. The impressive array of photos received in the past illustrates the diverse and exciting work anthropologists pursue, as well as the insights that AAA members have to offer.  Visit the AAA Photo Contest page for guidelines and submission details.

Curious about past selected photos? Check out the 201220112009 and 2008 photo contest results.

By Pat Foley  2012 AAA Photo Contest Winner - Process - Ethiopia Fieldwork Borana

By Pat Foley
2012 AAA Photo Contest Winner – Process – Ethiopia Fieldwork Borana

Heritage Distancing

Have you read Douglas Reeser and Claire Novotny’s recent Anthropology News article on heritage distancing? The article, Destroying Nohmul, describes the destruction of an ancient Maya site in Belize. Read the entire article on the Anthropology News website, below is an excerpt:

A work crew excavating the Nohmul site to be hauled away as road-fill.Photo courtesy of  CTV3 Belize News.

A work crew excavating the Nohmul site to be hauled away as road-fill.Photo courtesy of CTV3 Belize News.

The bulldozing and destruction of the ancient Maya site at Nohmul, in the Orange Walk district of northern Belize, has recently received widespread international attention. The largest structure of the ancient ceremonial center was reduced to rubble for use as road-fill by a local contracting company, a widely condemned act that will likely result in minimal consequences for the perpetrators.  This incident, and others like it, are examples of the vulnerability of major historical sites, demonstrates the importance of the archaeological landscape for communities, and brings up issues of cultural heritage and engaged anthropology.

Nohmul was a medium-sized city founded in the Middle Preclassic period (650 BC – 350 BC). Interestingly, its fortunes waned during the Early Classic period (AD 100 – 250), when it was all but abandoned, only to be re-occupied during the Terminal Classic (AD 900 – 1000), when ties to the Yucatan peninsula are evident in its architecture and ceramic assemblage. Nohmul is one example of Maya longevity, memory, and re-use of important sites. When they re-occupied it in the Terminal Classic is was already an ancient place – at least 1000 years old. Nohmul has been a marker of place, history, and ancestral heritage for more than 2,000 years (see Hammond et al.).

Though a small nation, the Belizean landscape is blanketed with ancestral remains of the ancient Maya, from densely populated cities like Caracol to villages such as Chan in the Belize River Valley, as well as countless unnamed hamlets throughout the country. As the Director of the Institute of Archaeology, Dr. Jaime Awe, pointed out in a recent interview with Belize’s Channel 7 News, the size of the Institute of Archaeology is miniscule compared with the archaeological resources they are tasked to manage, and Awe’s frustration over the events at Nohmul is palpable in the interviews he has given to the press. This is not to minimize their significant efforts  – last year archaeologists from the IA successfully and efficiently excavated late Preclassic period archaeological remains encountered during road construction in downtown San Ignacio. They also actively oversee and grant permits to numerous archaeological research projects taking place throughout the country.

We Run For Boston

BostonHave you seen the latest article by Robert R. Sauders on Anthropology News? It’s a powerful piece about the rise of solidarity activism in the aftermath of tragedy, entitled “We Run for Boston“. Below is an excerpt:

On April 15, 2013, the 117th running of the Boston Marathon commenced with a starter’s pistol for mobility-impaired entrants at 9:00am; yet, unlike previous years, the 2013 marathon ended at 2:50pm when two explosive devices were detonated within a few hundred yards of the finish line. The bombing of the 2013 Boston Marathon left three people dead – 8 year-old Martin Richard, 23 year-old Lu Lingzi and 29 year-old Krystle Campbell – and wounded more than 175 people. Due to the design of the bombs, many of the victims suffered severe shrapnel wounds to their lower extremities, with some so injured that amputation was necessary.

In the aftermath of the tragedy in Boston, people from across the United States and around the world expressed their shock over the brutality of the bombings, their anger with those who would perpetrate such actions and their sympathy with those who suffered injury and trauma. As medical professionals treated the wounded and law enforcement began the arduous process of collecting evidence to identify those responsible for the bombings, hundreds and thousands of ordinary people began organizing solidarity and fundraising efforts through social media tools. Within only a few short hours after the bombs ripped through Boylston Street, small groups dedicated to standing united with the Boston Marathon victims as well as with the city of Boston began appearing on Facebook, Twitter, blog and websites.

Read Sauder’s entire article on Anthropology-News.org.

A San Francisco Treat

Throughout the month of October, we’ll be giving readers gear for the Annual Meeting. Each day will be a different trivia question, so check back in daily for your chance to win. To answer the trivia question, you will need to leave your answer as a comment here on this blog. All the comments will be held for moderation until the end of the day. A commenter to answer the question correctly will be chosen at random to win an item of Annual Meeting gear. There will be one prize-winner each day. Once you win, you will be ineligible to win again during this blog series.

Today’s trivia question:

Anthropology News recently joined Twitter. What handle do you need to follow to stay up-to-date on the latest news in anthropology?

The AAA Annual Meeting will be held this year in San Francisco from November 14-18. If you have not done so already, be sure to book your hotel. You only have 5 days left to book your hotel at the discounted rate – don’t delay, book today!

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