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AAA Publishing Program – FAQs

Have you found yourself wondering what the goals, guiding principles or the key components of the AAA publishing program are? Check out the new Publications Frequently Asked Questions  page on the AAA website.

What are the goals of the AAA publishing program?
The publishing program aims to advance AAA core goals to: further the professional interests of anthropologists; disseminate anthropological knowledge and its uses to address human problems; promote the entire field of anthropology in all its diversity; and represent the discipline nationally and internationally, in the public and private sectors.

What are the guiding principles of the AAA publishing program?
The guiding principles of the AAA publishing program are to:

  • develop and maintain a diverse portfolio, in recognition of the diversity of the discipline;
  • serve the needs and interests of AAA membership and sections, and more broadly of those who produce, who access and who reference anthropological knowledge and content; and
  • facilitate the adaptation of the publishing program to ongoing changes in publication conditions, promoting both sustainability of the association’s publishing program and broadest possible dissemination of knowledge.

What are the key components of the AAA publishing program?
The AAA is unique among scholarly associations for the range and breadth of its publishing program. The AAA publishes a monthly newspaper (Anthropology News), scholarly journals, books, monographs, a guide to anthropology departments and publications related to its annual conference. Its flagship journal is American Anthropologist; in addition, AAA supports over twenty actively publishing journals and newsletters produced by its constituent sections. The list of publications is available at http://www.aaanet.org/publications/pubs/index.cfm. These are available through AnthroSource.

To whom should I address questions regarding the AAA publications program?
You can contact AAA Director of Publishing Oona Schmid, who will direct you to the right person if she cannot answer your question herself.

What to learn more about the AAA Publishing Program? Click here.

AN Seeks Proposals on Olympics

The widely-anticipated Olympics will next take place this summer in London. With this international event on the horizon, Anthropology News invites AAA members to shine an anthropological light on sports—and the Olympics—in its first exclusively online thematic series. Sports provide a unique opportunity for anthropologists from all fields to discuss a topic of great interest to the public at large. Proposals are welcome on the Olympics in particular, or sports generally.

This series will be published on www.anthropology-news.org throughout the summer while print AN is on its regular production break.

Guidelines

To participate, email a 300-word abstract and 50–100-word biosketch to AN Managing Editor Amy Goldenberg. We welcome proposals from current AAA members for In Focus commentaries, Teaching Strategies articles, Field Notes pieces, photo essays, photo features, news stories, interviews and more. Proposals for photo essays should also include up to five photographs (tiff or jpg), each with a caption and credit. Multimedia submissions are especially welcome for www.anthropology-news.org. All accepted contributions will be published online during the summer (June-August) at www.anthropology-news.org for up to 1,600 words, with flexible space for supplemental artwork and other supporting files.

Selected authors will be notified of their status in March and full articles will be due May 1.

Proposal deadline: February 29
Early submissions are encouraged.

Boundaries Featured in Feb AN

Latino immigrant group and allies travel in caravan to rally in Birmingham, AL. Taken June 2011 in Tuscaloosa, AL. Photo courtesy Gwendolyn Ferreti

Read this month’s thematic series on boundaries on the Anthropology News website. This month we’re pleased to start the series with essays by:

Be sure to check the AN website throughout February for more in this series by Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier, Joshua Craze, Britt Dahlberg, Gabrielle Oliveira, Maria Sapignoli, and Nayantara Sheoran.

Share what you think about any contribution to AN – rate any post on the AN website by clicking on the stars that appear under the title. AAA members are also invited to post comments to start or contribute to a discussion about any of the essays.

January AN Now Online

Transplanting a genetically modified rice plant from sterile media in the laboratory to soil in the biosafety plant room. Canada, 2005. Photo courtesy Christina Holmes

Read this month’s thematic series on anthropology and biotechnology on the Anthropology News website. This month we’re pleased to present essays by:

Share what you think of the essay - rate any post on the AN website by clicking on the stars that appear under the title. AAA members are also invited to post comments to start or contribute to a discussion about any of the essays.

In Memoriam of President Elizabeth Brumfiel

It is with great sorrow that we report the passing of former American Anthropological Association President Elizabeth Brumfiel.

Visit the Anthropology News website to read more about former President Brumfiel and her instrumental contributions to Anthropology.

AAA Member, Jason Antrosio compiled a wonderful listing of blog posts and news articles about President Brumfiel on his website – Anthropology Report.

AN Call for Proposals on Methods

Even with anthropology’s great diversity of fields and specializations, methods anthropologists use to plan and conduct research usually end up being identified as qualitative, quantitative or a hybrid of both. Anthropology News seeks to visit the relationship between these two methods for an upcoming thematic series on Qualitative and Quantitative Methods. Topics may include—but are not limited to—how these approaches currently are manifested in anthropological research; how they may be combined to get the most out of anthropological work; and how anthropologists use these methods to make their own contributions in interdisciplinary collaborations. AN seeks proposals that address these and other issues surrounding how anthropological research is conducted.

Guidelines

To participate, email a 300-word abstract and 50–100-word biosketch to AN Managing Editor Amy Goldenberg. We welcome proposals from current AAA members for In Focus commentaries, Teaching Strategies articles, Field Notes pieces, photo essays, photo features, news stories, interviews and more. Proposals for photo essays should also include up to five high resolution photographs (tiff or jpg), each with a caption and credit. Multimedia submissions are especially welcome for www.anthropology-news.org. All accepted contributions will be published online at www.anthropology-news.org for up to 1,600 words, with flexible space for supplemental artwork and other supporting files. Thematic contributions for print AN will be determined based on when completed In Focus contributions of 1,100–1,300 words in length are submitted.

Selected authors will be notified of their status in early February and full articles will be due March 1.

Proposal deadline: January 13
Early submissions are encouraged.

Proposal Deadline for Family and Kinship Series Extended to Dec 19

The proposal deadline for the Anthropology News series on family and kinship has been extended. The new submission deadline is December 19.

Anthropology has a long history of examining kinship in a myriad of ways. As notions of kinship and family have continued to evolve around the world, it is time to ask what anthropology has to say today about family and kinship. Anthropology News invites proposals for an April 2012 thematic series exploring family and kinship from a uniquely anthropological perspective. Topics may include—but are not limited to—new family structures, reproductive technologies, adoption, marriage, divorce, re-marriage and generational relationships. Contributors may also explore how governmental policies or societal movements affect families in action, such as China’s one-child policy or the US Defense of Marriage Act. AN seeks proposals that address these and other issues surrounding this fundamental area of anthropological research.

To participate, email a 300-word abstract and 50–100-word biosketch to AN Managing Editor Amy Goldenberg. We welcome proposals from current AAA members for In Focus commentaries, Teaching Strategies articles, Field Notes pieces, photo essays, photo features, news stories, interviews and more. Proposals for photo essays should also include up to five high resolution photographs (tiff or jpg), each with a caption and credit. Multimedia submissions are especially welcome for www.anthropology-news.org. All accepted contributions will be published online at www.anthropology-news.org for up to 1,600 words, with flexible space for supplemental artwork and other supporting files. Thematic contributions for print AN will be determined based on when completed In Focus contributions of 1,100–1,300 words in length are submitted. Selected authors will be notified of their status in early January and full articles will be due February 1.

December AN Celebrates Anthropology and the Peace Corps

Ralph Bolton during his time in the Peace Corps. Photo courtesy Paul Doughty

Throughout 2011, the Peace Corps has celebrated its 50th anniversary. This is an important milestone for anthropology as well. Anthropologists were directly involved with in its design and implementation, and through the years many anthropologists have regularly joined as volunteers, and former volunteers regularly pursue careers in anthropology. This month’s contributors include Ralph Bolton; Ian Colquhoun, Alex Totomarovario and Andrew Walsh; Scott Freeman; Frank HutchinsRonald A SchwarzKatherine McCardwell; and Veronica Muoio and Michael Sheridan.

Check back to the AN website through December for additional contributions by Kathleen Gillogly, Sean Kois, Courtney Kurlanska, and Jon Wolseth. AN thanks all these contributors who have helped recognize the intricate relationship between anthropology and the Peace Corps as this milestone year comes to a close.

All AN content is available at www.anthropology-news.org during the publication month, plus one month after, and subsequently through AnthroSource. Be sure to rate articles and share your comments on the AN website.

Anthropology News Seeks Proposals on Family and Kinship

Anthropology has a long history of examining kinship in a myriad of ways. As notions of kinship and family have continued to evolve around the world, it is time to ask what anthropology has to say today about family and kinship. Anthropology News invites proposals for an April 2012 thematic series exploring family and kinship from a uniquely anthropological perspective. Topics may include—but are not limited to—new family structures, reproductive technologies, adoption, marriage, divorce, re-marriage and generational relationships. Contributors may also explore how governmental policies or societal movements affect families in action, such as China’s one-child policy or the US Defense of Marriage Act. AN seeks proposals that address these and other issues surrounding this fundamental area of anthropological research.

Guidelines

To participate, email a 300-word abstract and 50–100-word biosketch to AN Managing Editor Amy Goldenberg. We welcome proposals from current AAA members for In Focus commentaries, Teaching Strategies articles, Field Notes pieces, photo essays, photo features, news stories, interviews and more. Proposals for photo essays should also include up to five high resolution photographs (tiff or jpg), each with a caption and credit. Multimedia submissions are especially welcome for www.anthropology-news.org. All accepted contributions will be published online at www.anthropology-news.org for up to 1,600 words, with flexible space for supplemental artwork and other supporting files. Thematic contributions for print AN will be determined based on when completed In Focus contributions of 1,100–1,300 words in length are submitted. Selected authors will be notified of their status in early January and full articles will be due February 1.

Proposal deadline: December 14
Early submissions are encouraged.

Occupy Wall Street; Occupy the World

Anthropology News website has an expansive array of content and commentary in addition the their print version. Here’s a highlight of a popular trending story by AAA member, Robert R. Sauders. Read the entire article here.

Over the past two months, the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement has captured the attention of the world with its ongoing demonstrations aimed at highlighting the social, political and economic disparities that exist between the wealthiest 1% and the remaining 99% of the population. What began as a call by the Canada-based Adbusters magazine for a protest in the financial district of New York City to address the overwhelming influence and power of corporations and financial institutions has quickly spread across the country and throughout the world.  However, defining OWS has proven difficult given its lack of hierarchical leadership, absence of specific, actionable demands and overwhelmingly cellular organizational structure. Views on the movement have varied with opponents framing OWS as “a growing mob” and supporters identifying OWS as “a democratic awakening”.

Read more>>

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