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New Podcast Features Dr. Julienne Rutherford

Listen to the latest podcast, featuring biological anthropologists, Dr. Julienne Rutherford.

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Dr. Rutherford in front of portrait entitled Psychedelic Placenta, by Mark Mershon, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing

Julienne Rutherford earned her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Indiana University in 2007. She is an assistant professor of Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences and adjunct assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is currently the President of the Midwest Primate Interest Group. She is also the Biological Anthropology Section editor for Anthropology News. She was named a Leadership Fellow by the AAA in 2011, and was the 2013 recipient of the American Society of Primatologists Legacy Award. She was recently named the UIC Researcher of the Year “Rising Star” in the Clinical Sciences.

Rutherford’s research revolves around a central interest in the dynamic maternal environment in which a fetus develops. She is primarily interested in the primate placenta as a signaling interface between mother and fetus. She works with both humans and non-human primates to address questions regarding the effect of maternal ecology (nutrition, life history experience, behavior) on placental morphology, metabolic function, and gene expression and downstream sequelae for offspring health both postnatally and later in life. She has published her multifaceted research in American Anthropologist, Placenta, American Journal of Physical Anthropologists, American Journal of Primatology, American Journal of Human Biology, Obesity, and Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. She recently co-edited the volume Building Babies: Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective. Her research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Society of Primatologists.

Douglas Ubelaker meets AAA staff

Each month AAA staff get together for a “Jam Session”, an informative meeting to provide staff with an insight into anthropology. Douglas Ubelaker was the guest of honor at the December Jam Session. Dr. Ubelaker introduced staff to biological and physical anthropology and shared insights on projects he’s led throughout his career. Staff had many questions about the process of carbon dating, the process for handling disasters involving many causalities, and the expanding database of Latin American peoples.

Dr. Ubelaker is the curator of the physical anthropology collection at the National Museum of Natural History and has consulted on hundreds of FBI cases, provided expert testimony in scores of court cases, and is President of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

New PhD Program at George Washington University

In contrast to our recent post about schools closing anthropological programs, we are pleased to find the Anthropology department at George Washington University to be flourishing to the point that they need to expand to a PhD program in Anthropology.

George Washington’s Anthropology Department was established in 1892. Faculty train students in the fields of Sociocultural Anthropology, Archaeology, Linguistic Anthropology and Biological Anthropology.

The department’s long-standing partnership with the Smithsonian and access to Washington, DC’s archival collections and influential policy-making institutions encourage intellectual creativity, effective communication and vigorous scholarship.

The department is seeking candidates with a strong background in anthropology or related disciplines. Contact Professor Richard Grinker or visit the website for more information. Applications will be accepted in the Fall of 2011.

Bio anthropology recap

The June American Anthropologist features 2009 annual reviews for archaeology, biological, linguistic, practicing and sociocultural anthropology. (All members of AAA can access the articles by logging in at AnthroSource.) Julienne Rutherford blogged about her recap, “Descent with Modification: Bioanthropological Identities in 2009,” and the article is accessable from her blog. She mentions she used a Facebook group to identify thoughts about the biggest stories of the year, which is pretty ingenious.

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