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Call for Papers for the 112th Annual Meeting – Submission Deadline Approaching

AAA2013 The submission deadline for Section Invited Sessions and Public Policy Forum proposals is March 15.

Visit the Meetings page for complete details and to submit your proposal. Click here for details and submission requirements.

The 112th AAA Annual Meeting will be held November 20-24, 2013 in Chicago, IL. This year’s meeting theme is Future Publics, Current Engagements. For complete meeting details, please visit the AAA Meetings webpage.

Follow meeting information via social media with the hashtag #AAA2013.

Call for Papers for the 112th Annual Meeting is now open

AAA2013 The online abstract submission system is now open for all proposals!

Visit the Meetings page for complete details and to submit your proposal. Click here for details and submission requirements.

The 112th AAA Annual Meeting will be held November 20-24, 2013 in Chicago, IL. This year’s meeting theme is Future Publics, Current Engagements. For complete meeting details, please visit the AAA Meetings webpage.

Follow meeting information via social media with the hashtag #AAA2013.

SEA 2013 Annual Meeting Call for Papers: Inequality

Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) 2013 Annual Meeting will be April 11-13, 2013 in St. Louis, Missouri.

Courtesy of SEA

The current recession, Occupy Wallstreet, and growing recognition of the gap between the top 1% and the middle class have brought new attention to the problem of economic and social inequality in the United States in particular and across the globe more generally. Questions regarding the origins, generation, and perpetuation of inequality in diverse societies are certainly not new to anthropologists. Anthropological and other social science research can improve understanding of the social, economic, cultural and political processes contributing to systems of inequality and stratification around the world. Better analysis of such processes not only enriches scholarship on critical issues but also has practical relevance for policy and interventions aimed at alleviating inequality.

This conference aims to bring together researchers from all fields of anthropology as well as other social sciences to present and discuss research that engages with the broad theme of inequality. There are a wide range of possible topics and questions to address. Papers and posters may address, but are certainly not limited to, the following:

  • At the most basic level, how is inequality defined, measured, studied and understood? How have measures and conceptions of inequality themselves changed over time? Is inequality most meaningful when considered in absolute terms of meeting basic needs or in relative terms that are context specific? How have hierarchy and inequality emerged in human societies and how are archeological remains studied and interpreted to identify social classes, early states, and relationships among state and non-state societies?
  • What socio-cultural institutions and structures create and maintain inequality among and between groups? Conversely, which social institutions and practices mitigate inequality and with which effects? For example, systems of reciprocity and leveling may reduce inequalities in small-scale societies, but such systems themselves are dynamic and changing. How have institutions and structures been affected by processes of global change such as the spread of capitalist economic systems, migration, and expanded economic exchange? What trends and patterns in inequality can we identify? While there is evidence that economic inequality has increased in the United States over the last several decades, other societies are experiencing lessening of inequality as economic growth reduces extreme poverty and brings more people into a new middle class. How are such trends experienced, understood, and explained?
  • Another set of questions surround the implications of inequality. The existence of some degree of social inequality is pervasive in human societies but the consequences of inequality may vary considerably from place to place and over time. For example, research has shown a negative relationship between economic inequality and health outcomes in society—while poorer people tend to have worse health outcomes, in societies with greater inequality these outcomes tend to persist even when basic needs are met and access to basic health services are provided. Why is this? Papers may explore the dynamic effects of inequality on important outcomes including health, education, political participation and leadership.

Please submit abstracts for papers (300-400 words) and posters (200-300 words) by email to Carolyn Lesorogol (clesorogol@wustl.edu). The deadline for abstract submissions is November 20, 2012.

Visit the 2013 SEA Annual Meeting webpage for complete details.


Society for the Anthropology of Work

The Society for the Anthropology of Work (SAW) invites submissions for the 2012 AAA Annual Meeting. We are open to panels and papers on all subjects, but especially encourage submissions related to this year’s theme of “Borders and Crossings.” This theme seems ideally suited to our section, as scholarship around work regularly involves the crossing of boundaries, whether cultural, geo-political, or disciplinary. We welcome panels that consider the movement of jobs, workers, information, and the products of labor across national or cultural boundaries. For complete details, click here.

SACC Annual Meeting – Call for Papers

The Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges annual meeting takes place in San Diego, CA from April 25-28, 2012.

Biruté Galdikas is the featured speaker. Registration fees include most meals, as well as field trips to the Beckman Center for Conservation Research at the San Diego Safari Park and a historical archeology site at the “haunted” Whaley House in Old Town.

Call for papers open until March 1.

For information and registration, go to www.saccweb.net

Call for Papers: Association for Feminist Anthropology Sessions

The Association for Feminist Anthropology welcomes sessions to be considered for inclusion in AFA’s programming for the 111th AAA Annual Meeting, to be held November 14-18, 2012 in San Francisco. The AAA meeting theme this year is “Borders,” so AFA particularly welcomes panels that take up “borders” from a feminist anthropological perspective. Various approaches to the theme include papers and sessions that might explore:

  • Borders/collaborations/intersections between feminist anthropology and other scholarly spaces from within and beyond anthropology: critical race studies, queer studies, and/or women’s studies; linguistics and genetics; political science, geography, environmental, and/or policy studies; migration and immigration studies and/or economics and archaeology and/or ethnography; biology/history/cultural studies; masculinity and/or gender studies; educational psychologies and social work; etc., etc., etc.
  • Existing or potential conversations/alliances/engagements between scholarly anthropology and everyday activism
  • Geographical, political, and ecological borders and the people who move across and re-define them: histories/archaeologies/economies of trade, trafficking, and/or transnationalism; refugees, resettlements, and asylum seekers; multiple and multiplying citizenships; migration, immigration, and diasporas; etc.
  • “Borders” and “borderlands” in terms of identities: liminal; queer; mestizaje; mixed-race; transgender
  • The “in between” scholar working across/between/among disciplines; conducting research and participating within communities; “insider anthropology”; Lorde’s concept and Harrison’s theorizing of the “outsider within”

We are especially interested in sessions that take advantage of the meeting site of San Francisco by involving local activists, practitioners, and policy makers, whether they are anthropologists or not. If you have questions about the details of registration for non-anthropologists, please let us know.

Also, if submitting for AFA invited or sponsored status, please consider whether your panel could be co-sponsored by AFA and either one or multiple other sections of the AAA. This allows AFA to maximize its presence in the program, gain a potentially greater audience for your panel, and cross the “borders” among AAA sections.

Deadlines:

February 1: Online abstract submission system opens on AAA website
March 15:
Deadline for submitting proposed sessions for section invited status consideration and public policy forums via www.aaanet.org
April 4:
Results of section invited session proposals announced by section program committee chairs
April 15:

  1. Proposal deadline for volunteered sessions, individual paper and poster presentations, media submissions and special events via www.aaanet.org
  2. Participants must be registered for the meeting by this date for inclusion in 2012 AAA Annual Meeting program

April 16-May 31: Section program co-chairs review and rank paper and session proposals
July 1-15:
Program decisions emailed to applicants

For more information, and to submit a proposed session, please contact 2012 Program Chairs: Susan Harper (sharperbisso@twu.edu) and Jennifer Patico (jpatico@gsu.edu).

Please also consider student-focused workshop ideas for AFA sponsorship. To learn more, or submit a proposal, contact Sophie Bjork-James, at (sbjorkjames@gmail.com).

It’s Montréal Monday!

Montréal will be the host city of the 110th AAA Annual Meeting! Montréal is the city with the largest number of restaurants per resident in all of North America. In the city’s tourist districts, there is an average of 64.9 restaurants per square kilometer (160 per square mile). Montréalers spend more than 12% of their income on food and beverages.

With those factoids, here’s your Montréal Monday trivia question:
During last year’s AAA Annual Meeting in New Orleans, how much money did AAA members spend on coffee?
Keep in mind that there were more than 6,000 meeting attendees over the course of five days. So sales will exceed $6,000 but are less than $20,000.

Understanding that our blog readers may prefer an evening cup of joe, please submit your answer as a comment to this post by 11:59 p.m. EST today (Monday, April 4) to be eligible to win. Two lucky winners will receive a coffee mug from our new AAA Café Press shop.

Remember, now is the time to renew your membership, complete your meeting registration and submit your proposal. The proposal deadline is April 15, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

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