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It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Undesignated Seat #3: Purnima Mankekar and Kristin Yarris.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Purnima Mankekar

Mankekar_PurnimaMy research is in the anthropology of gender and my career displays the convergence of my scholarship and activism. I have invested a great deal of energy at both my institutions, Stanford (1993-2006) and UCLA (2007-present), in monitoring and advocating for greater gender equity at all levels. I am committed to mentoring women students, students of color, and my junior women colleagues, and have a proven track record in this regard. I am a member of the UCLA senate as well as of the UC-wide senate where I monitor and advocate for gender equity, particularly with reference to women of color and queer/transgender students and faculty. I am now ready to apply my knowledge and experience to contexts wider than my home institution. As a long-standing member of the AAAs, I am excited about an opportunity to get more involved in the functioning of the organization, especially with regards to equity within our discipline. Being appointed to the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology will provide me with a terrific opportunity to do so. I look forward to being part of a team that is committed to working on gender equity issues in our discipline over the long term.

Kristin Yarris

Yarris_KristinI am committed to gender equity within our discipline and would use my research skills, professional experience and institutional position to help advance the CoGEA’s objectives. I believe the CoGEA should advocate for gender equity at various institutional levels within our discipline by working with students, tenure-track and non tenure-track faculty, administrative staff, practicing anthropologists and AAA governing bodies. I am committed to inclusivity in our discipline more broadly and support CoGEA’s efforts to achieve parity and equity for sexual, racial, ethnic, social class, and cultural minorities as well as for people living with disabilities. I would help advance CoGEA’s efforts to advocate for gender equity by researching the policies advanced by faculty and staff unions and other advocacy efforts and would seek to disseminate this information widely to AAA membership and beyond through the CoGEA. Other ideas I have for achieving gender parity within our discipline include advocating for family-friendly and healthy workplaces through leave and benefits policies, expanding institutional support for caregivers of dependent relatives, and monitoring gender disparities in specific outcomes such as time-to-tenure or ratio of tenured to non-tenured faculty in order to remedy these disparities.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Undesignated Seat #1: Maxine Oland and Sarah Surface Evans.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Maxine Oland

Oland_MaxineWhile our discipline claims some expertise in understanding the role of gender in cultures and institutions around the world, many anthropologists continue to face inequities in our own professional settings. My interest in serving on CoGEA is inspired by my personal experience–as an academic, an adjunct professor, and a mother–and by my conversations with young colleagues, who tell me stories of sexual harassment, and gender and sexuality-based discrimination across all subfields. My work with the Committee On The Status of Women in Archaeology (Society for American Archaeology) has brought attention to issues of motherhood and mentorship within the sub-discipline of archaeology. I seek a position on CoGEA to increase gender parity across anthropology more broadly. I am particularly interested in the ways that gender inequality intersects with class, race, ethnic identification, age, and sexuality, with life choices/ realities such as parenthood and marriage status, and with structural factors in our academic and professional institutions. Inequalities can be experienced at any level of career, but are of particular concern for young scholars and recent graduates, whose lack of professional power and mentorship puts them at the greatest risk of exploitation.

Sarah Surface Evans

Surface-Evans_SarahAs a female archaeologist, who has worked in the private sector, government, and academia, I have encountered many situations that underscore the immense work that remains to be done to ensure gender equity in our discipline. In 2011, I organized a round table (LEGACIES, SHIFTING REALITIES, AND (RE)INVENTING ROLES FOR WOMEN IN ARCHAEOLOGY) with Misty Jackson for the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association to initiate a frank and open discussion of gender bias and discrimination in archaeology. One of the outcomes of the round table was the creation of the Feminist Voices in Archaeology Blog, which is an online forum for sharing stories, creating a community, and building mentorship. While the blog has been somewhat successful, participation has been much less than we hoped for. It is all too clear to me that even anonymous digital spaces are not safe enough for this discussion. Consequently, I wish to serve on CoGEA in order to be able to foster a safe environment within the discipline and promote positive change in the anthropological community. To start, I would like to see the development of an AAA-sanctioned online forum and to use social media to increase mentorship and communication.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Student Seat: Holly Okonkwo and Tony Pomales.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Holly Okonkwo

Okonkwo_HollyIt is my pleasure to be selected as a candidate to run on the 2014 spring ballot for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Student Seat. I am running on the grounds of my intellectual and pedagogical commitment to foster diversity and more inclusive environments within the discipline and academy. Anthropology helped make the connections between the personal and the political by giving me the tools to not only understand my own positionality but also to question power relations, knowledge production and to confront discrimination. The field has allowed me to develop a voice when I often felt silenced and invisible. I am firmly committed to a career dedicated to exploring the experiences of women from diverse backgrounds and understanding how those experiences may better inform the discourse on institutions and diversity. As a member of the committee, I will utilize that same passion and commitment in supporting the mission of the American Anthropological Association in its pursuit of greater gender equity in the discipline and beyond.

Tony Pomales

Pomales_TonyThe AAA Committee on Gender Equity represents anthropology’s continued efforts toward collectively building an equitable research and work environment for all anthropologists, and also its commitment to creating and fostering equitable gender relations beyond the academy. This commitment requires a vision of gender as intersectional, so that accounts of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and other sites of difference-making factor into how gender is understood to be socially constructed and lived; thus making the committee more sensitive and alert to various forms of gender violence. My education in transnational feminism and critical race theory has prepared me to meet the responsibilities of this student seat. My graduate certification in Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies also has prepared and challenged me to formulate pedagogies for addressing issues of gender inequity in the classroom and in other settings. My dissertation research and work with aging sex worker-identified women in Costa Rica has also challenged me to develop a more critical understanding and awareness of gender discrimination and sexual abuse and the workings of power and violence, more broadly. Closer to home, my personal commitment to gender equity and social justice has also informed my work with students at a local high school who participate in a Gay Straight Alliance.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #4 of the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology. Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Rebecca GalembaRebecca Galemba

My research examines the ethics of extra-legal practices at the Mexico-Guatemala border in a context where the poor are excluded from the “legal” economy. My interest in this position, however, stems from coming from a family of women who advocated for gender equality in education. Discussions with fellow feminist academics have influenced me to examine how the economic downturn, corporatization of the university, and the increasing reliance on non-benefited and insecure positions affect gender equity in terms of attaining and retaining positions, and how this breaks down according to class, race/ethnicity, and citizenship. I am particularly concerned with how these structural changes affect women in their childbearing years, as they encounter inconsistent and often, insufficient, family policies. For example, Mary Ann Mason (2011) shows that women with children are twice as likely as their male counterparts to work in contingent positions. I will advocate for gender parity in the discipline by comparing university protocols for family support and gender equity to focus attention on our own institutional structures. I believe that the AAA can be a vital public voice in advancing gender equality within anthropology and beyond, including supporting comprehensive attention to gender and family issues at the policy level.

Christina_Beard MooseChristina Beard Moose

I am so pleased to be selected as a candidate for a seat on the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology.  Since I began my academic career, I have been interested in and working toward gender equity in both academia and society-at-large.  As a feminist anthropologist and a women’s studies professor at the community college level, I have the opportunity to introduce my mostly young, mostly naïve students to the world of women.  Because I am still disturbed with the fact that our discipline – along with most others – does not give serious thought and presence to women’s place, women’s roles, or what many largely consider “the war against women,” I find myself wanting to make an ever-greater effort toward equity.  Please consider viewing my personal website, http://drbeardmoose.com, for a look at how I work with my students, my further publishing, and my work in anthropology.  Thank-you.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2013 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Today’s feature are the candidates for undesignated seat #2 of the Committee on Gender Equality. Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality.

Cathy_CostinCathy Costin

Gender and equity issues are at the center of my professional life, both in my research and in my service to my University and professional organizations.  For more than two decades, I have studied the gendered division of labor and its intersection with the political economy, power, and social stratification.  As Chair of the Department of Anthropology at CSUN, it is imperative that I maintain a discrimination- and harassment-free work environment.  I served on several personnel and search committees, each of which received training on equity issues.  On campus, I have served as the Equity and Diversity Officer for the Liberal Studies Program and on the Integrated Teacher Education Program Working Group on Diversity.  I served two terms on the Society for American Archaeology’s Committee on the Status of Women in Archaeology and Chaired that organization’s Women in Archaeology Interest Group.  Finally, as part of my general community service, I served on the Windward School (Los Angeles, CA) Task Force on Diversity.  While we have made great progress since the days I was a graduate student and was told by a senior member of the faculty that “women should not be archaeologists,” there is much work that remains, and I look forward to ensuring a more equitable future for the next generation of anthropologists.

Laura MillerLaura Miller

Laws about equity appear to ebb and flow over the years, but lived experiences of gender, race and class inequality have remained rather steady. Rather than be discouraged by the stories, the statistics and the reports, I would like to join the CoGEA committee in their continuing efforts to monitor and report on issues of gender, race and class in the discipline. What has changed in recent years is the degree to which the feminization of contingent non-tenure-track faculty has increased and has become normalized. Gender disparities also persist in rates of promotion and in leadership positions within departments. As a body that is charged with the role of raising awareness and motivating change, CoGEA must consistently reconsider the same issues and carry on monitoring of the discipline. Because the last large-scale online survey on the status of gender, race and class  parity in anthropology was conducted in 2005-6 (and published in 2008), it is time to consider constructing a new survey of the status of  anthropology’s academic climate, work environment, work-family issues, and  gender issues experienced by both female and male anthropologists.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

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