• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 18,246 other followers

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Undesignated Seat #3: Purnima Mankekar and Kristin Yarris.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Purnima Mankekar

Mankekar_PurnimaMy research is in the anthropology of gender and my career displays the convergence of my scholarship and activism. I have invested a great deal of energy at both my institutions, Stanford (1993-2006) and UCLA (2007-present), in monitoring and advocating for greater gender equity at all levels. I am committed to mentoring women students, students of color, and my junior women colleagues, and have a proven track record in this regard. I am a member of the UCLA senate as well as of the UC-wide senate where I monitor and advocate for gender equity, particularly with reference to women of color and queer/transgender students and faculty. I am now ready to apply my knowledge and experience to contexts wider than my home institution. As a long-standing member of the AAAs, I am excited about an opportunity to get more involved in the functioning of the organization, especially with regards to equity within our discipline. Being appointed to the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology will provide me with a terrific opportunity to do so. I look forward to being part of a team that is committed to working on gender equity issues in our discipline over the long term.

Kristin Yarris

Yarris_KristinI am committed to gender equity within our discipline and would use my research skills, professional experience and institutional position to help advance the CoGEA’s objectives. I believe the CoGEA should advocate for gender equity at various institutional levels within our discipline by working with students, tenure-track and non tenure-track faculty, administrative staff, practicing anthropologists and AAA governing bodies. I am committed to inclusivity in our discipline more broadly and support CoGEA’s efforts to achieve parity and equity for sexual, racial, ethnic, social class, and cultural minorities as well as for people living with disabilities. I would help advance CoGEA’s efforts to advocate for gender equity by researching the policies advanced by faculty and staff unions and other advocacy efforts and would seek to disseminate this information widely to AAA membership and beyond through the CoGEA. Other ideas I have for achieving gender parity within our discipline include advocating for family-friendly and healthy workplaces through leave and benefits policies, expanding institutional support for caregivers of dependent relatives, and monitoring gender disparities in specific outcomes such as time-to-tenure or ratio of tenured to non-tenured faculty in order to remedy these disparities.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Undesignated Seat #1: Maxine Oland and Sarah Surface Evans.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Maxine Oland

Oland_MaxineWhile our discipline claims some expertise in understanding the role of gender in cultures and institutions around the world, many anthropologists continue to face inequities in our own professional settings. My interest in serving on CoGEA is inspired by my personal experience–as an academic, an adjunct professor, and a mother–and by my conversations with young colleagues, who tell me stories of sexual harassment, and gender and sexuality-based discrimination across all subfields. My work with the Committee On The Status of Women in Archaeology (Society for American Archaeology) has brought attention to issues of motherhood and mentorship within the sub-discipline of archaeology. I seek a position on CoGEA to increase gender parity across anthropology more broadly. I am particularly interested in the ways that gender inequality intersects with class, race, ethnic identification, age, and sexuality, with life choices/ realities such as parenthood and marriage status, and with structural factors in our academic and professional institutions. Inequalities can be experienced at any level of career, but are of particular concern for young scholars and recent graduates, whose lack of professional power and mentorship puts them at the greatest risk of exploitation.

Sarah Surface Evans

Surface-Evans_SarahAs a female archaeologist, who has worked in the private sector, government, and academia, I have encountered many situations that underscore the immense work that remains to be done to ensure gender equity in our discipline. In 2011, I organized a round table (LEGACIES, SHIFTING REALITIES, AND (RE)INVENTING ROLES FOR WOMEN IN ARCHAEOLOGY) with Misty Jackson for the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association to initiate a frank and open discussion of gender bias and discrimination in archaeology. One of the outcomes of the round table was the creation of the Feminist Voices in Archaeology Blog, which is an online forum for sharing stories, creating a community, and building mentorship. While the blog has been somewhat successful, participation has been much less than we hoped for. It is all too clear to me that even anonymous digital spaces are not safe enough for this discussion. Consequently, I wish to serve on CoGEA in order to be able to foster a safe environment within the discipline and promote positive change in the anthropological community. To start, I would like to see the development of an AAA-sanctioned online forum and to use social media to increase mentorship and communication.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

It’s time to vote in the 2014 Elections

Cast your vote by logging in to AnthroGateway, click on the “My Information” page, and then click on the “Vote Now!” button. The deadline to vote is May 31st at 5pm ET.

This month we’ll take a look at the candidates.

Featured today are the candidates for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Student Seat: Holly Okonkwo and Tony Pomales.

Responsibilities of the committee members include:

  • Monitor gender discrimination within the discipline
  • Pursue greater parity for women in the discipline by means of:
    a. monitoring, including gathering information that illuminates issues that effect the diverse women in anthropology as well as efforts to obtain existing comparable survey data,
    b. advocating, including bringing findings before the Association’s members, in the form of resolutions, when appropriate and
    c. educating, including distributing brochures, meeting with department chairs, setting up an interactive presence on the internet/web and writing periodic updates for the AN.
  • Identify forms of sexual harassment in all settings where anthropologists work and learn including the varieties of biases that complicate issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender stereotyping and preferences, class, and disabilities.
  • Interact on an ongoing basis with the Association’s long range planning process on issues of gender parity.

Click here to learn more about the Committee on Gender Equality in Anthropology.

Holly Okonkwo

Okonkwo_HollyIt is my pleasure to be selected as a candidate to run on the 2014 spring ballot for the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Student Seat. I am running on the grounds of my intellectual and pedagogical commitment to foster diversity and more inclusive environments within the discipline and academy. Anthropology helped make the connections between the personal and the political by giving me the tools to not only understand my own positionality but also to question power relations, knowledge production and to confront discrimination. The field has allowed me to develop a voice when I often felt silenced and invisible. I am firmly committed to a career dedicated to exploring the experiences of women from diverse backgrounds and understanding how those experiences may better inform the discourse on institutions and diversity. As a member of the committee, I will utilize that same passion and commitment in supporting the mission of the American Anthropological Association in its pursuit of greater gender equity in the discipline and beyond.

Tony Pomales

Pomales_TonyThe AAA Committee on Gender Equity represents anthropology’s continued efforts toward collectively building an equitable research and work environment for all anthropologists, and also its commitment to creating and fostering equitable gender relations beyond the academy. This commitment requires a vision of gender as intersectional, so that accounts of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and other sites of difference-making factor into how gender is understood to be socially constructed and lived; thus making the committee more sensitive and alert to various forms of gender violence. My education in transnational feminism and critical race theory has prepared me to meet the responsibilities of this student seat. My graduate certification in Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies also has prepared and challenged me to formulate pedagogies for addressing issues of gender inequity in the classroom and in other settings. My dissertation research and work with aging sex worker-identified women in Costa Rica has also challenged me to develop a more critical understanding and awareness of gender discrimination and sexual abuse and the workings of power and violence, more broadly. Closer to home, my personal commitment to gender equity and social justice has also informed my work with students at a local high school who participate in a Gay Straight Alliance.

Log-in to AnthroGateway to vote today!

Zero Tolerance for Sexual Harassment

In response to the recent survey about sexual harassment in anthropology, reported by Kathryn Clancy (U Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Katie Hinde (Harvard), Robin Nelson (U California, Riverside), and Julienne Rutherford (U Illinois, Chicago) the American Anthropological Association has issued the following statement on behalf of its more than 11,000 members.

 The American Anthropological Association (AAA) is shocked and dismayed to learn about the results of a recent survey reported at the April 2013 meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Knoxville, TN. The AAA has zero tolerance for sexual harassment in academic, professional, fieldwork or any other settings where our members work.  While the AAA does not have adjudicatory authority over these matters, our Statement on Ethics: Code of Professional Responsibility sets out our clear expectation that anthropologists “…have a responsibility to maintain respectful relationships with others. In mentoring students, interacting with colleagues, working with clients, acting as a reviewer or evaluator, or supervising staff, anthropologists should comport themselves in ways that promote an equitable, supportive and sustainable workplace environment.”

 We deplore the reported incidents of sexual harassment, and  expect employers and institutions of higher education to enforce the law as well as their specific anti-harassment policies for implementing the law. While sexual harassment is an issue that affects men and women alike, women bear the greatest burden of these incidents by far. The AAA has a long-term commitment to monitoring the status of women in anthropology through the Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology, renamed in 2011 the Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology. We encourage harassment victims who do not feel that adequate protections are available through their employer or home institution to contact the Association’s Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology confidentially for advice.

AAA Election Candidates Announced

On April 15, the American Anthropological Association’s association-wide elections and section elections will begin.  New to this year, you can view the candidates prior to the opening of the ballot.

Here are the candidates running in the association-wide elections:

AAA Secretary (3-year term)
Rani Alexander and Margaret Buckner

AAA Executive Board (3-year term)
Cultural Seat: A Lynn Bolles and Bill Maurer
Student Seat: Ryan Harrod and Karen G Williams
Undesignated #1: Cheryl Mwaria and Peter Neal Peregrine
Undesignated #4: Kathleen Musante Dewalt and Rayna Rapp

Nominations Committee (3-year term)
Practicing/Professional Seat: Stephen Edward Nash and Sharon M Stratton
Minority Seat: Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Kimberly Eison Simmons

Committee on Ethics (3-year term)
Practicing/Professional Seat: Gregory J Borgstede and Neely Myers
Undesignated #1: Christine Hegel-Cantarella and Christopher T Nelson

Committee on the Gender Equity in Anthropology (3-year term)
Practicing/Professional Seat: Carole McDavid and Sarah Ono
Undesignated #5: Heather Levi and Marcia Ochoa

Committee for Human Rights (3-year term)
Undesignated #2: Robert Lewis Clark and Tricia Redeker-Hepner
Undesignated #3: Eva Friedlander and K Anne Pyburn

Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology (3-year term)
Undesignated #3:  Elizabeth Chin and Jennifer D Heung
Undesignated #4: Flordeliz T Bugarin and Mayanthi L Fernando

Committee on Public Policy (3-year term)
Undesignated #7: Alexander A Bauer and Susan B Hyatt

Labor Relations Committee (3-year term)
Undesignated #1: Catherine Koehler and John R Roby
Undesignated #2: Brian McKenna and Christine J Walley

There are also 38 section elections that will be occurring during this time. To view the complete list of candidates running in the section elections, click here.

Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology Award

Nominations Due: May 1

The CoGEA Award (formerly known as the Squeaky Wheel Award), sponsored by the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology (CoGEA), recognizes individuals who have demonstrated the courage to bring to light and investigate practices in anthropology that are potentially discriminatory to women, have acted to raise awareness of women’s contributions to anthropology or identify barriers to full participation by women in anthropology, or have helped to bring about significant shifts in intellectual paradigms through their anthropological research on women’s lives.

The committee seeks nominations for scholars and practitioners from all subfields of anthropology who have acted to improve the status of women in anthropology through:

* Mentorship of female and male colleagues and students

* Research that has directly addressed the roles, situations, and experiences of women in anthropology

* Scholarship on women or gender that has influenced shifts in anthropological theory.

* The development of policies, procedures, or other professional standards that alleviate gender inequality in the field of anthropology

Anyone may submit nominations, including non-AAA members or non-anthropologists. Nominations should include the name, affiliation and title of the individual being nominated, a one- or two-paragraph description of the reason for the nomination and the nature of the person’s contribution to the improvement of the status of women in anthropology, and a copy of the nominee’s CV. The nomination also should include the name, address, phone number and email address of the nominator. Nominators may be contacted for additional material concerning finalists. Nominations should be sent by May 1 to Suzanne Mattingly, CoGEA Liaison at smatting@aaanet.org.  Awardees and nominators will be notified by July 1.

Previous CoGEA Award winners include: Liz Brumfiel (2011), Laura Nader (2010), Constance Sutton (2009), Margaret Conkey (2008), Joan Gero (2007), Sandra Morgen (2006), Adrienne Zihlman (2004), Sue Kent (2003), Carole Crumley (2002), Naomi Quinn (2001), Roger Sanjek (2000), Carol Kramer (1999), Louise Lamphere (1998), and John Yellen (1997).

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 18,246 other followers