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AAA Election Candidates Announced

On April 15, the American Anthropological Association’s association-wide elections and section elections will begin.  New to this year, you can view the candidates prior to the opening of the ballot.

Here are the candidates running in the association-wide elections:

AAA Secretary (3-year term)
Rani Alexander and Margaret Buckner

AAA Executive Board (3-year term)
Cultural Seat: A Lynn Bolles and Bill Maurer
Student Seat: Ryan Harrod and Karen G Williams
Undesignated #1: Cheryl Mwaria and Peter Neal Peregrine
Undesignated #4: Kathleen Musante Dewalt and Rayna Rapp

Nominations Committee (3-year term)
Practicing/Professional Seat: Stephen Edward Nash and Sharon M Stratton
Minority Seat: Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Kimberly Eison Simmons

Committee on Ethics (3-year term)
Practicing/Professional Seat: Gregory J Borgstede and Neely Myers
Undesignated #1: Christine Hegel-Cantarella and Christopher T Nelson

Committee on the Gender Equity in Anthropology (3-year term)
Practicing/Professional Seat: Carole McDavid and Sarah Ono
Undesignated #5: Heather Levi and Marcia Ochoa

Committee for Human Rights (3-year term)
Undesignated #2: Robert Lewis Clark and Tricia Redeker-Hepner
Undesignated #3: Eva Friedlander and K Anne Pyburn

Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology (3-year term)
Undesignated #3:  Elizabeth Chin and Jennifer D Heung
Undesignated #4: Flordeliz T Bugarin and Mayanthi L Fernando

Committee on Public Policy (3-year term)
Undesignated #7: Alexander A Bauer and Susan B Hyatt

Labor Relations Committee (3-year term)
Undesignated #1: Catherine Koehler and John R Roby
Undesignated #2: Brian McKenna and Christine J Walley

There are also 38 section elections that will be occurring during this time. To view the complete list of candidates running in the section elections, click here.

Elimination of “Linguistically Isolated” as Classification by the U.S. Census Bureau

AAA experts on Language and Social Justice from the Committee for Human Rights and the Society for Linguistic Anthropology have been working with the U.S. Census Bureau for several years to spur terminology change in the tabulation of household language data. As a result of our extensive communication with the U.S. Census Bureau, and with the support of the Census Advisory Committee on the Hispanic Population, the U.S. Census Bureau agreed to eliminate the phrase “linguistic isolation” from its products issued starting in 2011. In a recent letter, the Bureau writes, “We have changed the terminology to one that we feel is more descriptive and less stigmatizing. The phrase that will appear in all new products will be Households in which no one 14 and over speaks English only or speaks a language other than English at home and speaks English ‘very well.’

For the complete story, click here.

Judge’s ruling halts construction of the Belo Monte Hydroelectric Dam

Photo by BBC News

The Belo Monte Hydroelectric dam has been causing controversy in Brazil since the initial plan inception in the 1990’s. The Brazilian government believes the dam to be critical for economic development. The dam would be built on the Xingu River in the Eastern Amazon. In 2010, federal judges halted bidding on the construction of the dam for the third time. The injunction was overturned, plans progressed and construction began.

Last week, a federal judge again ordered work to be halted on the dam, as the project standards of the approving environmental agency were not upheld. The judge also stopped the release of project funding from the national development bank.

“All work on the site must be halted,” the judge said, according this report by Globo News. Among other environmental objections, the judge said the project failed to provide a sufficient contingency plan to ensure transportation along sections of river where water levels are expected to drop drastically.

The project has attracted worldwide attention. AAA’s Committee on Human Rights released letters to Brazilian officials in August of 2010 requesting the dam project to cease, as it would displace more than twenty-four indigenous tribes that have “original” status in the Brazilian national constitution. Such status was created to ensure protection of encroachment and harm. More recently the music artist, Sting and the director of the movie “Avatar”, James Cameron, have joined environmentalists in protest of the project.

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