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The Second Issue of Open Anthropology is Here!

Open Anthropology 150x150Violence is the theme of the second issue of Open Anthropology. The collection “On Violence” offers information, revelations, historical facts, descriptions of context and portraits of situations over time and place, a sampling of anthropological findings on the subject. Ten articles, two book reviews, and “The Editor’s Note” comprise this anthology written by anthropologists across time, sub-discipline, and journal title culled from the full AAA collection. 

“Taken as a whole, this collection deepens understanding and draws attention to the critical ingredients in the making of violence, a phenomenon ubiquitous in the contemporary world,” notes editor Alisse Waterston (John Jay College, CUNY). Synthesizing major anthropological viewpoints on the topic, Dr. Waterston identifies a key feature of violence and raises central questions that anthropologists answer:  “Domination is a critical element. In what specific way is the playing field of social life uneven? Who uses violence, of what types, and to what ends?”

Content in Open Anthropology is selected from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting any user to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics of interest to the general public, and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

AAA’s Society for Cultural Anthropology Paves New Way For Anthropological Publishing Program

CulAnth

In its latest efforts to respond to today’s evolving publishing climate the American Anthropological Association (AAA) celebrates the decision by one of its most influential sections to undertake efforts to expand the way its signature journal  is made available to scholars, researchers and the general public.

In 2012 the AAA Executive Board invited its sections to submit creative publishing proposals. The Society for Cultural Anthropology (SCA) responded with a proposal to transform Cultural Anthropology to an open access format. The plans, while still under development, will provide Cultural Anthropology at no charge to readers beginning in 2014.

While the publication will soon be available open access via Cultural Anthropology’s website, www.culanth.org, it will also remain available via AAA’s AnthroSource, the premier online portal serving the research, teaching and practicing needs of anthropologists.

AAA is very excited for the opportunity to test this format. This experiment will pave a path for the publishing program to learn best practices and responsible approaches towards a sustainable publishing model.

For additional details, please read the latest SCA press release.

Culture, Kin & Cognition in Oceania: Essays in Honor of Ward Goodenough

This week’s publication feature from the AAA online store is a collection of essays entitled: Culture, Kin & Cognition in Oceania: Essays in Honor of Ward Goodenough is edited by Mac Marshall and John L. Caughey.
This collection of essays exploring current issues in the study of Pacific cultures is intended both as a contribution to Oceanic cultural anthropology and as an honor to Ward H. Goodenough, whose work has had a tremendous impact on modern cultural anthropology in general and on the field of Oceanic anthropology in particular. Goodenough has contributed significantly to defining the issues presented in the pages to follow and to developing methods and theories with which to explore them. He has also influenced directly the thinking of the authors represented here, either while they were his students at the University of Pennsylvania or his younger colleagues in the field of Oceanic anthropology.
 
Contents include:
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction, John L. Caughey and Mac Marshall
  • Sex, Shit, and Shame: Changing Gender Relations among the Lakalai, Ann Chowning
  • The Cultural Construction of Reproduction and Its Relationship to Kinship and Gender (New Guinea Highlands), Anna Meigs
  • The Ethnographer as Detective: Solving the Puzzle of Niutao Land Tenure Rules, Jay Noricks
  • Tribal Words, Tribal Worlds: The Translatability of tapu and mana, Anne Salmond
  • Land, Sea, Gender, and Ghosts on Woleai-Lamotrek, William H. Alkire
  • Rashomon in Reverse: Ethnographic Agreement in Truk, Mac Marshall
  • Social Structure as Process: Longitudinal Perspectives on Kwaio Society, Roger M. Keesing

This collection is available at the AAA online store for a special AAA member price of $7.00. Click here to make your purchase today!

IMPORTANT – Please note that this book is not available in an electronic version. A print version can be purchased via the AAA Online Store. Shipping costs will apply.

The Oxford Bibliographies

Today’s guest blog post is written by AAA member, John L. Jackson, Jr. John is a Richard Perry University Professor of Communication and Anthropology and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies for the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

Oxford University Press has created a new and ambitious online project, Oxford Bibliographies, which attempts to provide scholars, students, and other interested readers with introductions to important topics and themes from many academic fields/disciplines. Anthropology’s module was launched last month, and I have agreed to help edit that particular module. Oxford was able to put together a strong editorial board for the project, which included scholars from all four of American anthropology’s major sub-fields: archaeology, linguistic anthropology, physical/biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. These nine scholars helped to select and vet the entries on various topics (including applied anthropology, cultural evolution, public archaeology, language ideology, globalization and many more). All in all, OB’s Anthropology site contains 50 entries penned by scholars from across the country and the world, including Tobias Kelly on Legal Anthropology, Vernon J. Williams on Franz Boas, Jeremy Sabloff on public archaeology, Neni Panourgia on interpretive anthropology, Kudzo Gavua on ethnoarchaeology, John Trumper on ethnoscience, Judith Irvine on Language Ideology, and Christina Campbell on primatology (just to name a few).

Although I don’t consider anthropology’s four fields a “sacred bundle” never to be disassembled under any circumstances, I am intrigued by the idea of forcing myself to learn more about the four farthest corners of this sprawling and hubris-filled discipline that imagines itself to cut across the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. Oxford’s new initiative will allow anthropologists to think about how much we might really gain from conversations across the intradisciplinary domains that often divide us. Oxford’s intervention will help us to see how physical anthropologists and cultural anthropologists might differently approach topics. For example, we can determine what kind of reviewer an urban anthropologist working in contemporary Latin America would make for a piece on “the histories of cities” crafted by an archaeologist. Or we can ask a physical anthropologist and a cultural anthropologist to pen two different entries for, say, “race” or “gender.” I’m intrigued to see what (hopefully productive!) sparks might fly from such four-fielded contact, and I’ve already learned so much about those other anthropological spheres during the build-up to this year’s launch. Check out the new site. 50 new entries will launch every January, and current entries will be revised and updated throughout the year.

Also, please feel free to let me know if there is a topic/entry you’d like to suggest and/or author.

Bookmark Oxford Bibliographies, today: oxfordbibliographiesonline.com

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