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Webinar Wednesdays: Engaging Anthropology

Webinar Wednesdays return on September 17th.

Anthropology in business will be the theme of Dr. Ken Erickson’s presentation when Webinar Wednesdays return on September 17 (2pm Eastern). Participation is open to all, but you must register. While you are registering, check out the library of earlier webinars available for streaming.

Dr. Erickson is the CEO of PacEth — a small market and design research firm that uses anthropological methods to help organizations understand consumers and design better products and services for them — and International Business faculty member at the Darla Moore School of Business, U. South Carolina

Webinar Description:

Doing “Consumer” Anthropology, Warnings and Advice*

Whether its burgers or Boeing, anthropological technique and theory have found significant purchase in the business world. Sometimes. The questions Anthropologists ask often lead to discomfiting revisions in thinking about who buys products and services and what using or experiencing them means. Bringing anthropological stories to the enterprise table can even raise fundamental questions about the nature of business. Fundamental questions (about value, valuation, sustainability, and suffering caused by organizations, for example) need not be laid aside while asking and answering enterprise tactical questions. Using video examples and tales from the field, this webinar offers tips and tricks for finding an anthropological focus that can be heard and, sometimes, become levers to think about and change organizational practices.

Click here to add this event to your calendar!

This webinar is free but registration is required

The password for the event will be “anthro”

Today! Webinar on Ethnography and Film with Dr. Harjant Gill

Harjant-GillToday (May 8, 2014) at 2 PM Harjant Gill will lead the fourth installment of AAA’s Webinar Wednesday (mixing it up on THURSDAY).  Harjant Gill is an assistant professor of anthropology at Towson University, Maryland. He received his PhD from American University in 2012. His research examines the intersections of masculinity, modernity and migration in India. Gill is also an award-winning filmmaker and has made several films that have screened at film festivals and academic conferences worldwide. His latest documentary, Roots of Love explores the changing significance of hair and turban among Sikhs and is currently being screened on BBC World News, BBC America, Doordarshan (Indian National TV) and on PBS channels nationwide. Dr. Gill is currently co-directing the Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Film & Media Festival. His website is www.TilotamaProductions.com

Save the Date: Webinar on Ethnography and Film with Dr. Harjant Gill

Harjant-GillOn May 8, 2014 at 2 PM Harjant Gill will lead the fourth installment of AAA’s Webinar Wednesday (mixing it up on THURSDAY).  Harjant Gill is an assistant professor of anthropology at Towson University, Maryland. He received his PhD from American University in 2012. His research examines the intersections of masculinity, modernity and migration in India. Gill is also an award-winning filmmaker and has made several films that have screened at film festivals and academic conferences worldwide. His latest documentary, Roots of Love explores the changing significance of hair and turban among Sikhs and is currently being screened on BBC World News, BBC America, Doordarshan (Indian National TV) and on PBS channels nationwide. Dr. Gill is currently co-directing the Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Film & Media Festival. His website is www.TilotamaProductions.com

Funded Master’s Degree Positions to Study the Gender and Change at University of Alaska Fairbanks

University of Alaska Fairbanks is seeking to recruit a graduate student interested in pursuing a Master’s (or Ph.D.) degree at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with a research focus on gender and change in Arctic Alaska. Student funding is provided by a research grant from the National Science Foundation. Successful applicants will be offered two years of funding, including a stipend of approximately $28,000/year, field research, tuition, benefits, and research expenses.

The graduate student will assist an NSF-funded ethnographic study of the ways in which Alaska Native communities are responding to global challenges while at the same time retaining and practicing their core indigenous values in the face of many uncertainties. Previous research has identified indigenous groups and women as some of the most vulnerable populations affected by pronounced political, economic, and environmental shifts. In this study we seek to examine gendered responses to the processes of globalization and significant social-environmental change and the shifting roles of women in the midst of such changes. This research will provide an in-depth study of the gendered, multigenerational responses to specific contemporary changes in Barrow, Alaska, an Iñupiat subsistence-based community and economic and administrative hub of the Arctic Slope region.

We are particularly interested in students with backgrounds in the human dimensions of environmental systems or environmental anthropology.

Selected students will start their graduate programs in the summer or fall of 2014. Awards are contingent on students being accepted for a graduate program of study by the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Students could complete degrees either in anthropology or fisheries.  Field research will be conducted in Barrow, Alaska.

If you are interested, please submit a CV, a copy of your transcript(s), a writing sample, the names and contact information of three references, and a short cover letter expressing your interest in the position to Courtney Carothers (clcarothers@alaska.edu) by January 15, 2014.

Count AAA in for World Malaria Day

AAA is recognizing World Malaria Day with a special virtual issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly. This virtual issue will be available to the public via Wiley Online Library from April 25 to July 15, 2011. Wiley-Blackwell is AAA’s publishing partner and host of AnthroSource.

Approximately half of the world’s population is at risk of malaria, particularly those living in lower-income countries, according to the World Health Organization. The selected articles of the virtual issue demonstrate ways that ethnography and human behavior studies help to change care management and public health policy of malaria and other infectious diseases. By joining the global movement to roll back the staggering statistics on malaria, anthropologists serve as catalyst around the world to research the medical and cultural impacts of this disease; help understand how public health practice can be best understood and used by diverse groups; and share their findings to help count malaria out.

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