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Where Are They Now?

As a PhD candidate in anthropology, it can be a real challenge to do fieldwork, teach classes, write your dissertation while keeping food in your stomach and a roof over your head. Anyone who’s in that exciting but occasionally nerve-wracking time probably agrees that a little extra funding can really help the process along. The AAA Minority Dissertation Fellowship offers exactly that but it can do even more for you. It’s not just a sum of money doled out: it also conveys prestige and can help launch your career in academia. The achievements of our past recipients demonstrate what the fellowship can do for you.

The Minority Dissertation Fellowship winner from 2002-2003, Audra Simpson, now works in the Anthropology department at Columbia University as an assistant professor. She’s published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and even has a book slated for publication, “Mohawk Interruptus.” Successful in her career, Audra also seeks to, in her own words, bring “the fields of anthropology and Native American Studies into a critical and constructive dialogue with each other.”

Julie Chu, the winner from 2003-2004, now occupies the position of assistant professor within the NYU Anthropology department. She has authored a number of articles in scholarly journals as well as a book, “Cosmologies of Credit: Transnational Mobility and the Politics of Destination in China.” Her book was well-received and garnered a substantial amount of attention, earning the 2011 Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society and the 2012 Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion. Aside from articles and books, she is also engaged in an ethnographic film project. In fact, she’s even developing an entirely new ethnographic focus in Chinese soundscapes!

A recent winner from 2008, Rocío Magaña, is already making her mark on the academic world! In short order, she became an assistant professor at Rutgers in the School of Arts & Sciences and has already published articles in edited volumes. According to her own description, her dissertation research offered “an ethnographic analysis of contemporary struggles over border control, humanitarian intervention, and unauthorized migration in the desert regions of the U.S.-Mexico Boundary.” Currently, she is in process of continuing that research and crafting a publishable book with it.

The Minority Dissertation Fellowship has already launched the careers of these anthropologists and a number of others, helping them establish a foothold in the tough world of academia. What can it do for you?

Deadline for AN Proposals on Funding Extended to July 1

The extended deadline for proposals for AN’s series on funding is July 1.

Securing grants, fellowships and other forms of funding is a major part of anthropology education, research, programming and more. This has become even more challenging as budget cuts are impacting funding sources.

The November 2011 issue of Anthropology News will feature a thematic series on funding. This will offer anthropologists the opportunity to share advice, insight and success stories on how to fund projects, from short-term individual research to long-term projects by organizational partnerships, and other issues related to funding. Essays in this series may include—but are not limited to—practical guidance from both recipients and reviewers, advice for presenting anthropology to non-anthropology proposal reviewers, recommendations for implementing funded projects, and suggestions for how to create projects that both appeal to funding agencies and are true to anthropological research.

To participate, email a 300-word abstract and 50–100-word biosketch to AN Managing Editor Amy Goldenberg. We welcome proposals for In Focus commentaries, Teaching Strategies articles, Field Notes pieces, photo essays, news stories and interviews. Proposals for photo essays should also include up to five high resolution photographs (tiff or jpg), each with a caption and credit. Multimedia submissions are encouraged for online publication. Final contributions for print AN will be 1,100–1,300 words in length for commentaries and shorter for other contribution types. More flexible word counts will be available for content published on the new AN website.

Questions? Send them to Amy Goldenberg. New deadline for proposals is July 1.

AN Seeks Proposals about Funding

Securing grants, fellowships and other forms of funding is a major part of anthropology education, research, programming and more. This has become even more challenging as budget cuts are impacting funding sources.

The November 2011 issue of Anthropology News will feature a thematic series on funding. This will offer anthropologists the opportunity to share advice, insight and success stories on how to fund projects, from short-term individual research to long-term projects by organizational partnerships, and other issues related to funding. Essays in this series may include—but are not limited to—practical guidance from both recipients and reviewers, advice for presenting anthropology to non-anthropology proposal reviewers, recommendations for implementing funded projects, and suggestions for how to create projects that both appeal to funding agencies and are true to anthropological research.

To participate, email a 300-word abstract and 50–100-word biosketch to AN Managing Editor Amy Goldenberg. We welcome proposals for In Focus commentaries, Teaching Strategies articles, Field Notes pieces, photo essays, news stories and interviews. Proposals for photo essays should also include up to five high resolution photographs (tiff or jpg), each with a caption and credit. Multimedia submissions are encouraged for online publication. Final contributions for print AN will be 1,100–1,300 words in length for commentaries and shorter for other contribution types. More flexible word counts will be available for content published on the new AN website.

Proposals are due June 24 and, as always, early submissions are encouraged. Selected authors will be notified of their status in July and full articles will be due September 1.

 

Contribute to AN in the Fall

Jan 2011 AN

Anthropology News is pleased to announce the thematic series for the fall issues. We are currently seeking proposals from AAA members for essays in all three series. Renovation and restoration is the theme for October. In this series, contributors are asked to explore how people recreate, renovate and rebuild for a wide range of reasons, from cultural preservation to recovery from human tragedy or natural catastrophe. Proposals are due May 20.

November’s issue will feature a series on funding. Contributors will have the opportunity to share advice, insight and success stories on how to fund projects, from short-term individual research to long-term projects by organizational partnerships. Proposals are due June 24.

We’ll close out 2011 with a series on the Peace Corps and Anthropology, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps. AN seek proposals including—but not limited to—experiences as a Peace Corps volunteer, examination of the relationship between anthropology and the Peace Corps, influence of the Peace Corps on research and careers in anthropology, and coverage of events celebrating the 50th year anniversary. Proposals are due July 22.

Details and guidelines are available online. Proposals using multi-media content are especially encouraged. Questions? Send them to Amy Goldenberg.

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