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Debut Issue of Economic Anthropology – Greed and Excess

SEA LogoThe Society for Economic Anthropology’s newest journal Economic Anthropology is now available!

The inaugural issue of Economic Anthropology, formerly published as the SEA Monograph Series, is now available on AnthroSource. This collection of articles from the proceedings of the Society for Economic Anthropology’s 2011 Annual Meeting Conference engages with and explores the concepts of “greed” and “excess” as accusations, ideas and behaviors that are shaped by social processes across time and place. Volume editors, Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijit note in their introduction that,

The articles in this collection are intended as just a first attempt to generate a broader conversation and move beyond accusatory judgments and folk concepts. Nonetheless, it is out hope that this issue will shed some new light on the ways and reasons that emotionally charged ideas and philosophies pertaining to greed and excess have emerged in past and present societies.

To access this exciting issue, login to AnthroSource.

Table of Contents

Economic AnthropologyIntroducing an Inquiry into the Social Economies of Greed and Excess – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuijt

Section I: History and Contemporaneity of Greed and Excess
System Failure: Institutions, Incentives, and Collective Folly – James Surowiecki
Greed Is Bad, Neutral, and Good: A Historical Perspective on Excessive Accumulation and Consumption – Rahul Oka and Ian Kuij

Section II: Ambiguities of Surplus: Can Marginalized Peoples Be Greedy and Excessive?
Land, Labor, and Things: Surplus in a New West Indian Colony (1763-1807) – Mark W. Hauser
Poverty and Excess in Binge Economies – Richard Wilk
The Social and Economic Production of Greed Cooperation, and Taste in an Ohio Food Auction – Jeffrey H. Cohen and Susan M. Klemetti

Section III: Who Shares the Surplus: “Greedy” Subsistence Producers inTransition Economies
Greed in a “Tribal” Economy? Acquisitiveness and Reciprocity in Lisu Society – E. Paul Durrenberger and Kathleen Gillogly
Boons and Busts: Asset Dynamics, Disaster, and the Politics of Wealth in Rural Mongolia – Daniel J. Murphy
Risk-Seeking Peasants, Excessive Artisans: Speculation in the Northern Andes – Jason Antrosio and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld
Loci of Greed in a Caribbean Paradise: Land Conflicts in Bocas del Toro, Panama – Gayatri Thamp

Section IV: Entitled to the Surplus Greed and Excess among the Elites, Non-Elites, and the Nouveau Riche
The Potentiality and the Consequences of Surplus: Agricultural Production and Institutional Transformation in the Northern Basin of Mexico – Christopher Morehart
The Problem of Greed in Economic Anthropology: Sumptuary Laws and New Consumerism in China – Joseph Bosco

Section V: Some Perspectives and New Directions on the Anthropology of Greed and Excess
Folk and Scientific Concepts in the Study of Greed – Robert C. Hunt
The Rich Possibilities of Greed and Excess – Virginia R. Dominguez

December AN Celebrates Anthropology and the Peace Corps

Ralph Bolton during his time in the Peace Corps. Photo courtesy Paul Doughty

Throughout 2011, the Peace Corps has celebrated its 50th anniversary. This is an important milestone for anthropology as well. Anthropologists were directly involved with in its design and implementation, and through the years many anthropologists have regularly joined as volunteers, and former volunteers regularly pursue careers in anthropology. This month’s contributors include Ralph Bolton; Ian Colquhoun, Alex Totomarovario and Andrew Walsh; Scott Freeman; Frank HutchinsRonald A SchwarzKatherine McCardwell; and Veronica Muoio and Michael Sheridan.

Check back to the AN website through December for additional contributions by Kathleen Gillogly, Sean Kois, Courtney Kurlanska, and Jon Wolseth. AN thanks all these contributors who have helped recognize the intricate relationship between anthropology and the Peace Corps as this milestone year comes to a close.

All AN content is available at www.anthropology-news.org during the publication month, plus one month after, and subsequently through AnthroSource. Be sure to rate articles and share your comments on the AN website.

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