• 2016 AA Editor Search
  • Get Ready for the Annual Meeting

    From t-shirts to journals, 2014 Annual Meeting Gear Shop Now
  • Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 18,245 other followers

New Issue of Open Anthropology

Open Anthropology

Open Anthropology, a digital-only publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its latest issue. In World on the Move: Migration Stories, editor Alisse Waterston (CUNY – John Jay College of Criminal Justice) offers thirteen articles and two book reviews of anthropological works on the movement and circulation of people, ideas, languages and objects, and the human stories that reveal these processes. This issue also sheds light on current humanitarian crises and legislative debates related to migration.

Waterston curates a set of articles that explore the social and cultural aspects of migration across the globe and over time. “In the midst of contentious debates about immigrants and immigration law, anthropology provides an important framework for understanding. It resists the narrow view, asks the tough questions, contextualizes phenomena, gathers the evidence, studies and analyzes it, develops reasoned argument, and only then comes to judgment,” writes Dr. Waterston in her accompanying editorial.

At a time when immigration catalyzes human rights debates and the movement of people around the world has changed the global landscape, Open Anthropology provides a cross-cultural and historical perspective on migration. It also anticipates the upcoming AAA Public Education Initiative on migration, currently in development.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and made freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months for users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics that are of interest to the general public, educators, advocates and public policy makers.

Open Anthropology is available at www.aaaopenanthro.org

New Open Anthropology Issue

Open Anthropology 150x150Open Anthropology, a digital-only publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its latest issue. In this issue, entitled Sport: Pleasure and Violence, Competition and Sociality, guest editor Niko Besnier (U Amsterdam) offers twelve articles and two book reviews of anthropological works that illustrate how anthropology sheds light on the ways in which sport is deeply intertwined with power, competition, play, money, and violence.

Guest Editor Besnier curates a set of articles that explore the social, cultural and economic aspects of sports across the globe and over time. As he notes, “Anthropologists are particularly well placed to analyze the complexities of what human beings do in social groups to understand the power of sport to variously provoke pleasure, incite violence, arouse competition and promote sociality.”

At a time when the people of the world remember the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi (Russia) and anticipate the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro, Open Anthropology provides a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the world of sports and its entanglement with state power, among other forces.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and is made freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months for users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics that are of interest to the general public and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

 

Open Anthropology is available at http://www.aaaopenanthro.org

AAA President-elect Distinguishably Honored By Students

AWaterstonPhoto02.2014Named the 2014 Distinguished Faculty by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Alumni Association, Dr. Alisse Waterston will be honored during the annual Alumni Reunion in April. Dr. Waterston, a professor in the Department of Anthropology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice since 2003, is a cultural anthropologist who studies the human consequences of structural and systematic violence and inequality. She is the American Anthropological Association’s President-elect and Editor of the Association’s newest digital publication, Open Anthropology. Dr. Waterston is a Soros International Scholar affiliated with the Gender Studies Department, Tbilisi State University, Republic of Georgia. And she is the author of My Father’s Wars: Migration, Memory and the Violence of a Century, an intimate ethnography in the Routledge Series of Innovative Ethnographies.

Calling all Discussion Groups and Anthropology Clubs: Let’s Talk About the March Issue of Open Anthropology!

OpenAnthropology728x90_2

Has the new issue of Open Anthropology, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care, piqued your interest in anthropological understandings of health, illness, medicine, and health care? Are you interested in building the conversation on your campus or in your community? Throughout March and April, AAA is encouraging anthropology clubs and discussion groups to explore, debate and analyze contemporary issues of health, illness, medicine and health care based on the material included in the March issue of Open Anthropology.

We’d then like to hear from you! Send us stories, videos, and/or photographs that highlight and illustrate the depth, liveliness and creativity of your discussion. Two submissions will be selected to be featured on the AAA blog in May.

Jump start your conversations using these questions:

  • In what ways does the idea of the “social life of” health, illness, medicine and health care that frames the specific articles in this issue of Open Anthropology, offer a way to shift public conversations on these issues?
  • How can anthropology help identify omissions in policy and public conversations regarding health and health care?
  • In current public conversations and contemporary policy debates on health, illness, medicine and health care, how are inequality and violence engaged with- or ignored? Using these articles, how can anthropologists use ethnography to shed light on inequality and violence?
  • How have these articles intersected with your own research and/or research interests?
  • How are anthropologists across the four fields of anthropology writing about the social life of health, illness, medicine and health care? Beyond the articles presented in this issue of Open Anthropology, what additional research, theories and concepts will help us illuminate our views of health, illness, medicine and  health care?

Please submit your stories and/or photographs to Jennie at jsimpson@aaanet.org by April 30th. We look forward to your submissions!

Open Anthropology – The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care: Anthropological Views

OpenAnthropology728x90_2

Open Anthropology, a digital-only, public publication of the American Anthropological Association, is proud to announce the release of its third issue. In this edition, The Social Life of Health, Illness, Medicine and Health Care: Anthropological Views, editor Alisse Waterston (John Jay College, CUNY) curates eleven articles and three book reviews of anthropological works that encompass today’s health care debate, access to insurance and quality health care, social inequity, and historical perspectives on medicinal practices and well-being across cultures.

In her prefatory remarks, Waterston reflects on the national health care conversation, noting that “(t)he whole mess – the fights, the threats, the web crashes – was successful in capturing the public’s attention,” and is left to wonder if the cacophony served to distract the public from the key issues around access to health care. Editor Waterston offers a selection of anthropology articles that “help defamiliarize the ‘normal,’ that make strange the familiar, a process that can lead to new insights, understandings, and positions.”

At a time when the issues of health care and insurance are on the national agenda, Open Anthropology provides cross-cultural information and historical perspective to inform national and global health care policy and practice. Anthropologists recognize that when it comes to health care, “We are all in the same frail boat,” as Gerald D. Berreman notes in his article featured here. Others document obstacles to health and well-being as well as success stories in the effort to provide quality health care to all.

Content in Open Anthropology is culled from the full archive of AAA publications, curated into issues, and will be freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles. Each issue is dedicated to topics of interest to the general public, and that may have direct or indirect public policy implications.

Open Anthropology is available at http://www.aaaopenanthro.org

Call for New Editor of Open Anthropology

Open Anthropology is a digital-only publication of the AAA. Each year, three fresh themes open up anthropology to new readers. For instance, “Marriage and Other Arrangements” coincided with the US Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage and drew public policy makers and gay activists’ attention to anthropological analyses of the family. Each issue in Open Anthropology is culled from the rich archive of AAA publications and its contents are freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles.

“We hope that Open Anthropology will help make anthropology and anthropologists more visible outside the academy and expand our role in important social issues and policy discussions” says former AAA President, Leith Mullings.

Starting in 2015, AAA is seeking a new editor for Open Anthropology. Candidates need prior experience reaching out to public readers and have a track record of commitment to anthropology as a four- or five-field discipline. Appointment will be made by the AAA Executive Board and interested candidates are encouraged to send cover letters, resumes, and a list of proposed themes to Oona Schmid, Director, Publishing at AAA (oschmid@aaanet.org) by 1 April 2014.

Eye-opening anthropology

AAA debuts new video abstracts. Teresa Figueroa Sanchez comments on her Anthropology of Work Review article about “California Strawberries” and R. Brian Ferguson talks about his work, “Blood of the Leviathan.” The latter (originally published in American Ethnologist) is part of a collection “On Violence” in Open Anthropology. So, what can video abstractsdo that the written word does not? These short takes let authors personally explain their work. As visual documents, they provide a way for non-specialists to quickly understand the central themes. Students might well find these clips fascinating in terms of making research projects “real,” by showing how these anthropologists came to their projects and how anthropologists craft their research. I hope you’ll watch these productions, tell us what you think, and enjoy these efforts to open up anthropology.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 18,245 other followers