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Call for New Editor of Open Anthropology

Open Anthropology is a digital-only publication of the AAA. Each year, three fresh themes open up anthropology to new readers. For instance, “Marriage and Other Arrangements” coincided with the US Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage and drew public policy makers and gay activists’ attention to anthropological analyses of the family. Each issue in Open Anthropology is culled from the rich archive of AAA publications and its contents are freely available on the internet for a minimum of six months, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles.

“We hope that Open Anthropology will help make anthropology and anthropologists more visible outside the academy and expand our role in important social issues and policy discussions” says former AAA President, Leith Mullings.

Starting in 2015, AAA is seeking a new editor for Open Anthropology. Candidates need prior experience reaching out to public readers and have a track record of commitment to anthropology as a four- or five-field discipline. Appointment will be made by the AAA Executive Board and interested candidates are encouraged to send cover letters, resumes, and a list of proposed themes to Oona Schmid, Director, Publishing at AAA (oschmid@aaanet.org) by 1 April 2014.

Eye-opening anthropology

AAA debuts new video abstracts. Teresa Figueroa Sanchez comments on her Anthropology of Work Review article about “California Strawberries” and R. Brian Ferguson talks about his work, “Blood of the Leviathan.” The latter (originally published in American Ethnologist) is part of a collection “On Violence” in Open Anthropology. So, what can video abstractsdo that the written word does not? These short takes let authors personally explain their work. As visual documents, they provide a way for non-specialists to quickly understand the central themes. Students might well find these clips fascinating in terms of making research projects “real,” by showing how these anthropologists came to their projects and how anthropologists craft their research. I hope you’ll watch these productions, tell us what you think, and enjoy these efforts to open up anthropology.

American Anthropological Association Position on Dissemination of Research

The AAA’s role is to be vigilant when it comes to proposed legislation that aims to limit dissemination of research, and that may disproportionately protect private over public interests. At the same time, AAA’s role is to protect the sustainability of our publications program, for anthropology as a whole and for individual authors.  We continue to investigate models that both support broad dissemination of knowledge and a sustainable publishing program.

To this end, the Executive Board has adopted the following motion:

Acknowledging the Association’s commitment to “a publications program that disseminates the most current anthropological research, expertise, and interpretation to its members, the discipline, and the broader society,” but also the need for a sustainable publication strategy, and building on the Association’s support for a variety of publishing models, the AAA opposes any Congressional legislation which, if it were enacted, imposes a blanket prohibition against open access publishing policies by all federal agencies.

Webinar on Publishing, Promotion and Tenure – 10/14 @ 1pm EST

Join us Friday, October 14th at 1:00pm EST for a webinar on the future of publishing, promotion and tenure.

This digital event should be a fascinating conversation between three anthropologists, each with extensive background with the promotion and tenure process. The Committee for the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing  is organizing an online webinar to discuss the role of digital publications and the rapidly changing publishing landscape around us and how these forces intersect with promotion and tenure. Join:

· Former AAA President Don Brenneis, professor of anthropology at UC-Santa Cruz and author of scholarship on peer review and assessment cultures.
· Provost of the University of Missouri, Brian Foster, a former anthropology department chair now in a leading role with promotion and tenure assessment and decisions.
· Professor of Anthropology, Richard Handler, who served for ten years as Associate Dean for Academic Programs at the University of Virginia.
· Ed Liebow, AAA Treasurer, will be the Master of Ceremonies.

We hope you join us for an illuminating conversation about the role of publications and tenure, evaluation standards, and the changing digital landscape of scholarly production. If you are interested in registering for this session (or wish to suggest other topics for CFPEP to consider) please email: eguevara@aaanet.org.

Bio anthropology recap

The June American Anthropologist features 2009 annual reviews for archaeology, biological, linguistic, practicing and sociocultural anthropology. (All members of AAA can access the articles by logging in at AnthroSource.) Julienne Rutherford blogged about her recap, “Descent with Modification: Bioanthropological Identities in 2009,” and the article is accessable from her blog. She mentions she used a Facebook group to identify thoughts about the biggest stories of the year, which is pretty ingenious.

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