• Open Anthropology
  • Latest AAA Podcast

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 15,778 other followers

  • Archives

Scientists Respond to The New York Times

For the third time in three years, The New York Times has published an article by Nicholas Wade (12/20/10, 12/13/10, and again on February 18, 2013) that includes misrepresentations of the American Anthropological Association’s views on science, ethics, and the role of debate in the advancement of knowledge. Some have found their way into the recent article by Emily Eakin in The New York Times Magazine Section (2/17/13). In light of these misrepresentations, we present for the record the exact wording of core guiding documents of the Association.

The American Anthropological Association’s Statement of Purpose (Mission Statement) last amended in 1983 reads as follows: “The purposes of the Association shall be to advance anthropology as the science that studies humankind in all its aspects, through archeological, biological, ethnological and linguistic research; and to further the professional interests of American anthropologists, including the dissemination of anthropological knowledge and its use to solve human problems.”

The AAA’s Long Range Plan, revised April 22, 2011, states: “The American Anthropological Association will support the growth, advancement and application of anthropological science and interpretation through research, publication, and dissemination within a broad range of educational and research institutions as well as to the society at large.”

Furthermore, while AAA does not take sides in intellectual disputes among individual members, the Association remains committed to ethical practice and to robust debate about disciplinary ethics. The Long Range Plan states: “The AAA will reinforce and promote the values associated with the acquisition of anthropological knowledge, expertise, and interpretation. This includes a commitment to the AAA Code of Ethics.” The new version of that code, now entitled AAA Statement on Ethics: Principles of Professional Responsibility, was released in 2012. The Statement reflects the multiyear efforts of two different working groups and an Association-wide discussion of draft versions. The final version was adopted by vote of the membership in 2012.

Finally, the Association continues to view lively debate as key to knowledge production. Disagreements about what is good science and what is bad science do not translate into an attack on science.

AAA’s Video Round Up

A flurry of interesting videos have made their way across the AAA desks this week. Embracing people and race, here are our favorites:

The Anthropology department of the Univeristy of North Carolina – Charlotte is actively engaged in the RACE: Are We Do Different? exhibit that has opened this past week in Charlotte, NC at Discovery Place. Check out these two clips from the local television broadcast News 14 Carolina. The first clip features AAA’s very own Janet Levy. Dr. Levy is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology.

 The second clip features AAA’s very own Jonathan Marks. Dr. Marks is an Anthropology Professor at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte.

 

The next video was highlighted on The Clog, a blog by Charlotte’s Creative Loafing. This blog featured the RACE: Are We So Different? exhibit in a post titled “We’re All Pink Underneath“. To prepare readers for the exhibit, the blog highlights The New York Times video U.S.: Young and Mixed in America.

In this video, The Huffington Post features video footage of one of the last uncontacted tribes in the Amazon. Click here for the complete Huffington Post article.

Do you have a favorite video? Add the video link to your comment. We might highlight it in our next video round-up!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 15,778 other followers